17

Something like a duke, and the title wasn't all that special. The English word "prince" is translated from the Russian "knyaz (князь)", which could be used either to denote a member of the royal family or more commonly a member of the nobility. Men directly related to the Tsar were usually called Velikiy Knyaz or Grand Prince instead. &...


16

Nothing proves it. The closest are Dunya's accusations, including her knowledge that he both discussed poison with her, AND went to get that poison. "...Не твой револьвер, а Марфы Петровны, которую ты убил, злодей! У тебя ничего не было своего в ее доме. Я взяла его, как стала подозревать, на что ты способен." "Ты жену отравил, я знаю, ты сам убийца!…...


12

The word "propaganda" at that time was not understood the way we tend to understand it today. It is more or less safe to understand it based on its etymology, i.e. based on the verb "propagate" - propaganda: "A concerted set of messages aimed at influencing the opinions or behaviour of large numbers of people." - just remove the ...


11

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, author of such works as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, was a devout Orthodox Catholic from a very young age. He is reported to have, at a young age, recited prayers to guests to their great amazement. He is also said to have been greatly affected by various Bible selections. Through his time in the military ...


10

I'm not well acquainted with most of Dostoevsky's writings, but The House of the Dead stands out as a controversial case. In it, we see the character Isay Fomitch Bumstein, who worked as both a jeweler and a pawnbroker (close enough to the stereotypical Jewish moneylender). Apart from his job, Dostoevsky's physical characterization of Bumstein is not quite ...


9

When Rodion says he could be wrong, he means his words for the previous sentence: Hurrah for Sonia! What a mine they've dug there! And they're making the most of it! Yes, they are making the most of it! They've wept over it and grown used to it. Man grows used to everything, the scoundrel! So he says that man must be a scoundrel to accept the fact ...


9

Where the translator (Constance Garnett) used “secret police”, the Russian text is “Третьего отделения” (tretyego otdeleniya) meaning “third section”, that is, the Third Section of His Imperial Majesty’s Own Chancellery, the secret police department of the Imperial Russian government from 1826 to 1880. Its headquarters were near the Panteleymonovsky Bridge ...


8

What exactly is he referring to? He's most probably referring to the events in Russian history when Russia was on a brink of ceasing to exist as a state. There were a number of grave moments throughout the centuries, to name a few: Mongol invasion of Kievan Rus (XIII-XV centuries) Смутное Время ("Time of Troubles", as Wiki puts it) (late XVI - ...


8

Колокол (Kolokol meaning “bell”) was a mid-19th century dissident Russian-language newspaper, printed in London and Geneva to evade Russian state censorship. Commenting on the lines of verse quoted by Kolya: Long will you remember The house at the Chain bridge Victor Terras writes: These two lines are from a widely known antigovernment satire, repeatedly ...


7

Dostoyevsky's neighbor was Alexander Barannikov, a revolutionary and terrorist, who participated in the murder of the Russian chief of police and Moscow bombings. The story was first discovered by Viktor Shklovsky, our great literary scholar, who included official letter about the search in his novellette published in 1933. Later this story was further ...


6

It was published during 1866 in the issues 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12. Dostoyevsky was still writing the novel in 1866 during the publication and finished it only in November or December. January issue with part one (number III): February issue with part two (it says "Part 1, chapters VIII-XIII") (number II): April issue with part three (it says "Part 2, ...


5

First, congratulations on having read so far in Brothers Karamazov. It takes determination, at the very least, to suffer through the excruciating detail that is characteristic of Dostoevsky’s style. Dostoevsky gives us many character portraits of people in Russia at that time, many of them negative. So, in general, the scene with Lygavy portrays another ...


5

Unlike, say, Dover Editions which are photoreproductions of public domain texts, the Barnes & Noble classic editions are, in fact, newly typeset texts. They don't give any attribution to their source text on the copyright page and are probably not working from Project Gutenberg texts which can often include OCR errors, especially in longer/more obscure ...


4

It is a XIIth century Slavic apocrypha «Хождение Богородицы по мукам». In English: “The journey of the Mother of God through hell”. Aleksey Tolstoy’s novel Хождение по мукам (The Road to Calvary refers to it too.


4

First the definition would be good. Sadly, there are quite a few but I think that only one is important: Relating to the philosophy or theories of aesthetics. Of or concerning the appreciation of beauty or good taste: aesthetic judgment; the aesthetic appeal of the exhibit. Attractive or appealing: the more aesthetic features of the building. Characterized ...


3

I admit that I haven't read the novel, but a look at the Russian text suggests that by "benevolent Providence" Raskolnikov means God. The relevant quote is Russian is as follows: во-вторых, что целый месяц всеблагое провидение беспокоил, призывая в свидетели, что не для своей, дескать, плоти и похоти предпринимаю, а имею в виду великолепную и приятную ...


3

This question Razumihin will answer himself (Part III, chapter I, same translation) “What do you think?” shouted Razumihin, louder than ever, “you think I am attacking them for talking nonsense? Not a bit! I like them to talk nonsense. That’s man’s one privilege over all creation. Through error you come to the truth! I am a man because I err! You ...


3

This must refer to Kolokol, which means "Bell" or "The Bell" (Russian doesn't have a word for "the") in Russian. It was a weekly Russian-language 19th-century newspaper with significant revolutionary and socialist leanings, which was banned in Russia at the time. From the Wikipedia article: At Kolokol's base was a theory of ...


3

My source for this answer is "A Karamazov Companion" by Vitor Terras (1981), University of Wisconsin Press. Terras writes: The Brothers Karamazov contains more autobiographic ele­ments than most of Dostoevsky’s works (...) Let's go through some of the characters. Aliosha It seems that Aliosha was based on people from real life. Aliosha Karamazov’...


3

The translator chose to "translate" the Russian measure of weight of that time into something that would make sense to English natives. In the original text Dostoevsky uses the phrase семипудовая купчиха, where пуд is approx. 16 kilos, while семь means "seven". The narrator ("devil" from Ivan's nightmare) alludes to a ...


2

After the first mention of Claude Bernard, Mitya uses him as a sort of personalised synecdoche for the worldview that he feels such scientists represent, the conquest of religion by science. The word "Bernard" appears 13 times in the text of The Brothers Karamazov. Most of them are already quoted in your question, and the others shed no further ...


2

This short story is a hilarious caricature on the--oh so typical--characters. Both of them are pathetically "ignoble1, repulsive, and senseless", and being such, they of course blame the world on it. Exposing these traits is the centrepoint of much of Chekhov's output. So this "another old general" is the punch line, so to speak. Like ...


2

I seriously doubt that claim. Russian wiki does not have it as well. According to its account, the haemorrhage was caused by an emotional conversation with his sister regarding an inheritance. The conversation happened at January 26th. As far as I can tell (given my limited knowledge of the languages you've linked), neither article mentioned this ...


2

I don't know where the lined Wiki page got the Rhodes idea. The name Rodion really comes from the Greek Ῥοδίων. In the context of Crime and Punishment it bears several meanings, and likely refers to all of its literal meaning (heroic, as Raskolnikov tries himself as a hero), King Herod (who is a despicable villain in Russian tradition), Herodion of Patras (...


2

There is no mention of a "thin, dark, passageway", at least in the original. This description refers to the backstairs, before the landing and apartment itself. Immediately behind the apartment threshold, there is a [dark] entry. The kitchen is separated from the entry by a partition; that is, there is no 'substantial' stand-alone kitchen per se; it's just ...


2

There is one very important thing in these words, which is completely lost in translation. Throughout the story, Rutenspitz speaks normal Russian, but these last words he pronounces with a heavy German accent (more even in Germanized Russian): Ви получаит казённый квартир, с дровами, с лихт и с прислугой, чего ви недостоин... Why has his speech changed? Or ...


2

I've searched for some material in Russian on the topic and haven't found much. The only book by a serious critic, I found, is by Vadim Kozhinov. He writes that in early editions of the novel Lizaveta was pregnant, but later Dostoevsky removed this information. Kozhinov supposes that may be Lizaveta's murder could have been initial Dostoevsky's idea, that he ...


2

In my reading of this passage, a few things have always struck me: Mitya alerts the forester who is relatively uninterested in the entire ordeal, though he still is intrigued enough to take a peek inside and say everything will be OK. Perhaps this mirrors the interest others take in the juicy debauchery of Mitya's own struggle without being concerned enough ...


2

English translation is very close to the original text: Ну а коли я соврал, — воскликнул он вдруг невольно, — коли действительно не подлец человек, весь вообще, весь род то есть человеческий, то значит, что остальное всё — предрассудки, одни только страхи напущенные, и нет никаких преград, и так тому и следует быть!.. My interpretation is that scoundrels ...


1

" Do people mean to say that a work is nihilistic, or explores seemingly irrational behavior? Or do they mean something else entirely?" They may mean both. Dostoevsky's work is characterized by social realism, rather in Dickensian style, concerned with financial hardship mixed with a non-academic psychology of hidden and demented impulses (something wholly ...


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