9

Holmes and Watson are the criminals being chased by James Moriarty and Sebastian Moran. Some of the clues about the main characters: It mentions 'The Dynamics of an Asteroid' as the paper written by the detective friend; this is written by Moriarty in Doyle's works. The narrator tells what a crack shot he was, as Moran is -- and as Watson never was The ...


7

Some geographical context might be helpful. The scene of the crime is the North Kent Marshes: “A shocking tragedy has come to light in a meadow about a mile from Dartford. About two o’clock this morning, a rural constable observed a rick on fire out on the marshes near the creek.” R. Austin Freeman (1924). ‘The Funeral Pyre’. In The Blue Scarab, pp. 238–239....


6

Competitive walking, known as ‘pedestrianism’, was the forerunner of today’s walking races. Per Wikipedia: Pedestrianism was a 19th-century form of competitive walking, often professional and funded by wagering, from which the modern sport of racewalking developed.


5

There is no more connection between a livery stable and a boat than there is a Pastrycook’s and a boat. The mariner is mocking the Inspector sarcastically, by suggesting businesses that have nothing to do with boats, because he thinks the Inspector’s question is ridiculous.


4

This is "The Night at the Hotel" by Siegfried Lenz ‘Then,’ Schwamm said, ‘he goes on to his school. But when he returns home, he acts bewildered and in a daze, and sometimes even breaks out in tears. He can’t do his homework, he doesn’t want to play or talk to anyone. This has been going on for months, day after day. The boy is simply making ...


4

Literature is not defined by the presence or absence of coincidence. Moreover, Rainsford falling overboard would be better described as the element that sets the plot in motion rather than "coincidence". Since Rainsford is a hunter rather than a seaman, his falling from the rail isn't particularly improbable. It is not less believable than, for ...


3

They are sailing on a navigable river, the river has twists and turns through the landscape. This means that the pursuers cannot always see the river itself, but when the barge’s sails are not screened from their view by landform or vegetation they see them across the intervening land. As to the ‘then it’ll turn’ section: I looked up the ‘Whitaker channel’ ...


3

This looks like "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by Leo Tolstoy: He (Ivan Ilyich) was so interested in it all that he often did things himself, rearranging the furniture, or rehanging the curtains. Once when mounting a step-ladder to show the upholsterer, who did not understand, how he wanted the hangings draped, he mad a false step and slipped, but ...


3

‘On the top of the spring tide’ refers to the timing of when they got their boar stuck in the mud, which in turn affects where it got stuck. A ‘Spring Tide’ is A tide of maximum amplitude after new and full moon, when the forces of the sun and moon act in the same direction i.e. it is one of the two highest tides in a month. To get stuck in the mud on the ...


3

Isleworth is described as an "unlikely neighbourhood" because Dr. Thorndyke would not have expected of men of such means to live there. According to Wikipedia, Isleworth during Georgian and Victorian times had attracted many "aristocrats and high achievers" who built "many mansions and large houses". From this perspective, it ...


3

It’s called "Enjoying the Chase" by Kirsty Moseley. Hope this helps!


3

Under the provisions of the Capital Punishment Amendment Act 1868, the Home Secretary (probably Henry Bruce) had issued the following rules for executions: A black flag to be hoisted at the moment of execution, upon a staff placed on an elevated and conspicuous part of the prison, and to remain displayed for one hour. The bell of the prison, or if ...


2

Louis Quinze and Wilhelm II are relevant to the styles of furniture in the room, though perhaps not in a way some readers might expect. Louis XV's name is connected with one of several styles of furniture developed in France because several French rulers (or those around them, e.g. Louis XV's mistress Madame de Pompadour) were patrons of the arts. It is no ...


2

I don't know if it was common, but I suspect that it has happened. Let me point to my favourite occurence. The Vajdahunyad Castle in the Budapest City Park is a modern castle built shortly before 1989, imitating the style of mediaeval castles of Hunyadi. It was first built as a hasty wooden structure so that it may be ready for the Millenium celebrations ...


2

A ‘ship’s figure’ is a carved figurehead. Its expression cannot change so there is nothing to be gained or learned from watching it, as it will always look the same. It profits an observer nothing to watch it. Therefore the Inspector’s face is as unchanging as a carved figurehead and the two officers can learn nothing from staring at the Inspector’s face.


1

The point of view in ‘A Worn Path’ can be described as “third-person, limited, objective”. That is, it is told from the point of view of a “third person”, a narrator who not themselves a character in the story; it is “limited” (as opposed to “omniscient”), describing only things seen and experienced by the protagonist; and it is “objective” (as opposed to “...


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