27

The single strongest piece of evidence is surely this, from A Naval Treaty: "Thank you. I have no doubt I can get details from Forbes. The authorities are excellent at amassing facts, though they do not always use them to advantage. What a lovely thing a rose is!" [Holmes] walked past the couch to the open window, and held up the drooping stalk of ...


23

As asked, the question is difficult to answer. Several premises are open to question: What constitutes a "major work"? What is your definition of "sympathy" in this context? Whatever the definition, how sure are we that Milton is, in fact, sympathetic to Satan? Given that Henry VIII broke with the Catholic church in 1532 (barely a ...


21

Note: This does not in ANY WAY represent my own religious views. It's possible that C.S. Lewis meant for the Dwarfs to represent the Jews. At the end of The Last Battle, the Dwarfs refused to be 'taken in' by Aslan. It's possible that C.S. Lewis meant for this to represent the Jews refusing to believe in Jesus. The Jews didn't believe in Jesus. They don't ...


19

In-universe El-ahrairah is much more legendary than mythical, more like a hero than a god. Here's how the text describes him the very first time his name appears: What Robin Hood is to the English and John Henry to the American Negroes, Elil-Hrair-Rah, or El-ahrairah - The Prince with a Thousand Enemies - is to rabbits. Uncle Remus might well have heard of ...


18

I don't believe it would be right to call him a religious fanatic. His plays contain both pro- and anti-Christian elements, all of which seem to be more about playing into the sense of the times than any personal conviction. There are hints that he may have been a crypto-Catholic (as his father was accused of, the nature of the Ghost in Hamlet, and so on), ...


14

From an interview here: Q: How much of Jesus Christ is there in Rand? We have the wounded palms, side wound, crown of swords... How representational of Jesus Christ is Rand? ROBERT JORDAN: Rand has some elements of Jesus Christ, yes. But he is intended more to be a general "messiah figure." An archetype such as Arthur, rather than a manifestation of ...


12

The entire book can be seen as an allegory for the Bible. It has a startlingly large number of allusions to Jewish and Christian myths and stories. Here are some of them: The island, in the beginning, is a parallel for the Garden of Eden Ralph's first act upon reaching the island is to take off his clothes and jump into the water. This symbolizes the ...


12

TLDR: 1 - Marlow was not an atheist in the modern sense. 2- Dr Faustus is not as clearly religious as it first appears Let's start by pointing out that "atheism" doesn't necessarily stop an author from writing about theism. Umberto Eco, for example, is a professed atheist yet is the author of The Name of the Rose, a novel set in a medieval ...


11

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, author of such works as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, was a devout Orthodox Catholic from a very young age. He is reported to have, at a young age, recited prayers to guests to their great amazement. He is also said to have been greatly affected by various Bible selections. Through his time in the military ...


11

First we need to understand what the "Deep Magic" is/represents, before moving to the "Deeper Magic." We know from chapter 13 of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe that the Deep Magic is written in several places (on the Stone Table, on the Scepter of the Emperor-beyond-the-Sea, etc.). We also know from that chapter that it defines what Justice requires....


8

Not in the mythos as Lovecraft conceived it It is hard to prove a negative: there is no categorical statement in Lovecraft's oeuvre that definitively rejects the Abrahamic God. Even if there was, since it is fiction the writer would be free to change their mind from tale to tale as it suited. Nevertheless, we can say with some certainty that it was not ...


8

Although Aslan was more of an immediate presence to Narnia than the Emperor, he and his father worked in perfect unity. The Emperor was often referred to as "Aslan's great Father, the Emperor-over-the-sea" and other such titles. He was greatly respected by his son and all who honoured the Lion. [Wikipedia] I do feel not the the charge of deism can ...


8

Like most English people until well into the twentieth century, Shakespeare was baptized into the Anglican church, but it does not follow that he was himself any more religious than the average Englishman of his time; and the treatment of Jews in The Merchant of Venice is a weak basis for the argument that Shakespeare himself was a devout Christian. To ...


8

You don't know how funny it is to read this. This requires both cultural knowledge of Korea as well as the language. The "Heavenly Lord" or in this context is formally called Haneulnim (하늘님, "Heavenly King"). "Heaven" in this context is not the afterlife, but the literal sky and everything in the sky. I'm not too sure on the ...


5

A few thoughts here: First, it's actually a little more subtle than to say that Narnia is a strict allegory. C. S. Lewis's intent (and some people, such as @Hamlet, would argue that that's not really the same thing as meaning - that's a different discussion though) was to write a "re-imagining" of the Christian story of sorts - for example, if a world like ...


5

It isn't, at least not in the form we know it. The society presented in the book is one of leisure, easily consumed entertainment and carelessnes. Any thoughtprovoking material (i.e. books, especially critical or philosophical ones) has been banned, as it might lead to earnest and meaningful thoughts, discussions and questions. Of course the people fail to ...


5

Existing answers have covered a few of these concepts, but there was plenty of Christian iconography apart from the devil who promoted evil among mankind. The island itself, particularly Simon's glade, functions as a kind of Garden of Eden that is gradually corrupted by the introduction of evil. Simon's glade turns into a kind of church because of him. ...


4

I don't have the book in front of me right now, but Aslan makes it clear in The Magician's Nephew that animals could go back to being "dumb" beasts. In fact, there are several examples of this in the series (such as the cat when he sees Tash in The Last Battle). Consider the following quote (from chapter 10): "Creatures, I give you yourselves," said the ...


4

In an article in Haaretz, Elon Gilad and Ruth Schuster write: The “marble arch” may allude to Titus’ Victory Arch in Rome, a monument celebrating the Roman final victory over the Jews. If so, Cohen is comparing his lover to the Roman victors and himself to the devastated Jews, who had just lost their Temple. Like the revolt, he is crushed.


4

the title “Holy Thursday” implies a religious context, making ["Blake appeals to his readers' faith"] also correct. That sentence from the textbook betrays a remarkable lack of understanding of poetry and of Blake's poetry in particular. Just because the title refers to a religious date, doesn't at all mean the author is appealing to his readers' faith. I ...


4

He is possibly (most likely) Catholic. Let's look at some extracts: The Gloria Scott - dog bit his ankle 'as I went down to chapel' - chapel typically a catholic word in English The Crooked Man - shows knowledge of bible when he identifies the epithet David - might just know the bible but could indicate Catholicism The Boscombe Valley Mystery - tells ...


3

Walther Sallaberger's book Das Gilgamesch-Epos. Mythos, Werk und Tradition (C. H. Beck, 2008) discusses the flood story mainly in the context of the Standard Babylonian version of the Gilgamesh Epic. This is the version whose redaction is attributed to Sîn-lēqi-unninni and which Sallaberger dates to the 11th century BC. There is no evidence that the flood ...


3

I do not find JRRT's stories particularly Christian, but I do really enjoy them. Having been exposed to some radical fundamentalists any mention of Magic is an aspect of demons at work to deceive. From Bible Baptists Publications, Wizards, Witches, and the Word of God: “Neither repented they of their murders, nor of their sorceries, nor of their ...


3

Anglicanism is somehow 'between' Catholicism and Protestantism. To answer your first question, the phrase "via media" means "the middle road", and one of the commonest contexts where this phrase is used is to describe the Church of England as a "via media" between the Catholic Church and the various Protestant churches. The above-linked Wikipedia page for ...


3

Possibly the reference to seeing her flag on the marble arch refers to seeing her conquered, or taken, by another? Since the following line is "Our love is not a victory march" - A victory march for one, implies a defeat for another. I can't speak to which arch may have been intended, but I think this interpretation fits with the other themes in the song.


3

I don't think Cohen has ever made this clear, so we can only speculate. While I agree that the Arch of Titus makes the most sense, three other candidates jump out at me: Washington Square Arch in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, NYC, the city Cohen was in when he wrote Hallelujah. Soldiers marched under this arch at the New York City Victory Parade of 1946 (...


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