20

TL;DR: There are a few connections between Poe's works, generally via one story being directly or indirectly referenced in another one published later. However, there are two instances of multiple stories having the same universe, and sometimes the same characters: A Predicament and How to Write a Blackwood Article, and The Landscape-Garden, The Domain of ...


12

So...I'm going to say probably coincidence, though there is some evidence in your favor. Thus I'll present the evidence first and then my own conclusion; do with it what you will. Tolkien on Shakespeare The evidence here is mixed, but I'll give a brief summary. Tolkien referred to the shabby use made in Shakespeare of the coming of 'Great Birnam wood to ...


10

There's nothing in Great Expectations that would suggest that Ms. Havisham would be interested in speed at all: as far as I remember, we only ever see her inside Satis House, wearing her wedding-dress, living in darkness. The closest we get to seeing Ms. Havisham at speed is when Pip is instructed to walk her around her dining table in Chapter 11 of Great ...


7

Arguably, all of Salinger's published stories share the same "universe," which is his own. That said, specific overlap in characters in currently-published works is limited to the stories and novellas that revolve around the Glass family. In publication order, they are: "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" (1948), starring Seymour Glass and his wife Muriel "...


7

Yes. The Percy Jackson and the Olympians, The Heroes of Olympus, and The Trials of Apollo are definitely in the same universe – they center on Camp Half-Blood. In The Kane Chronicles, we can conclude that they are in the same universe, given that there are no less than three crossover stories with PJO - The Son of Sobek, The Staff of Serapis, and The Crown ...


6

I've just finished reading V for Vendetta in its collected trade paperback edition. At the end, there is a short essay by Alan Moore, titled "Behind the Painted Smile", which explains the creative process behind the book - how it was conceived and how it was executed. Initially, Alan Moore wanted to write a similarly themed comic about a guy called "The ...


6

Yes, a reader of Wide Sargasso Sea who is unaware of its connection to Jane Eyre is pretty much guaranteed to have missed the entire point of the novel. Jane Eyre is so iconic that Rhys could simply assume knowledge of its plot while writing her own book. The heroine of Wide Sargasso Sea, her husband, and her half-brother are all very important characters ...


6

All of them. By the end of The Dark Tower, it is revealed that the story takes place If you're looking for a list of every explicit reference, Wikipedia had a good list going that you can edit, but this has been deleted. I'm leaving that link in just in case someone recreates that page, but otherwise you can read the list on archive.org.


5

There are no recurring characters, except in the sequels and spin-offs. For example, as you noted with "except for the sequels", there are recurring villains such as Slappy the dummy. However, in the spin-off series of Goosebumps HorrorLand, there are recurring places/enemies (such as the park itself). But in the plain Goosebumps series, no.


5

Let's start by listing the titles of all the Songs, and noting that you can read them in full here. I'll now discuss various possible pairings among these poems, but bear in mind that there's no definitive answer to this. Arguments could be made for many different ways of pairing up, and we're never going to have a perfect bijection. It's almost an exercise ...


4

The novel may be "The Inimitable Jeeves" by P.G. Wodehouse. It concerns mainly the events associated with a secondary character, Bingo Little, who falls in love with almost all the women he meets. He is the target of scorn from the principle character, Bertie. From memory, I believe he makes the reference regarding seven-tenths of women.


3

There is no consensus among critics about whether Wide Sargasso Sea stands on its own or not. For example, Francis Wyndham wrote in his introduction to the first edition (1966): For many years, Jean Rhys has been haunted by the figure of the first Mrs Rochester—the mad wife in Jane Eyre. The present novel—completed at last after much revision and agonized ...


1

I'd argue that they aren't connected. Not because of direct textual evidence, but because of a lack of it. Challenger makes the entire world shake and scream; d uring one of his stories, everyone dies for an hour or two. These are noticeable things - you'd expect them to be mentioned in Holmes stories. That's not to say that they couldn't take place in ...


1

I don't think there's stronger evidence than the reasons you lay out; I'm not sure of an interview where Moore explicitly lays out this connection though I don't think he's the kind of author to do so. He's the kind of author to plaster his works with hidden and not so hidden references, homages and the like; I don't think there's a danger of seeing things ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible