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TL;DR: There are a few connections between Poe's works, generally via one story being directly or indirectly referenced in another one published later. However, there are two instances of multiple stories having the same universe, and sometimes the same characters: A Predicament and How to Write a Blackwood Article, and The Landscape-Garden, The Domain of ...


12

So...I'm going to say probably coincidence, though there is some evidence in your favor. Thus I'll present the evidence first and then my own conclusion; do with it what you will. Tolkien on Shakespeare The evidence here is mixed, but I'll give a brief summary. Tolkien referred to the shabby use made in Shakespeare of the coming of 'Great Birnam wood to ...


11

There's nothing in Great Expectations that would suggest that Ms. Havisham would be interested in speed at all: as far as I remember, we only ever see her inside Satis House, wearing her wedding-dress, living in darkness. The closest we get to seeing Ms. Havisham at speed is when Pip is instructed to walk her around her dining table in Chapter 11 of Great ...


10

In the original version of The Hobbit, no. In any version of the Hobbit, the Ring is not shown to have much effect on Bilbo. He uses it as a useful tool, a way of turning invisible which gets him out of various scrapes and helps him through the story. A simple invisibility ring is an ancient trope in literature, and in The Hobbit the Ring doesn't function as ...


9

tl;dr A section of the Mahābhārata narrates the story of Rāma. This section, called the Rāmopākhyāna, is far shorter than the Rāmāyaṇa which, as you correctly note, is a different epic altogether. The story as told in the Ramopākhyāna also differs in some details from the Rāmāyaṇa. The exact textual relationship between Valmiki's Rāmāyaṇa and the ...


8

The Mahabharata does not contain the Ramayana (an epic work 24000 verses long). It does, however, contain the so-called Ramopakhyana which (like the Ramayana) tells the story of Rama and Sita but (unlike the Ramayana) is only about 700 verses long. This is the "abbreviated version of the Ramayana" referred to in the Wikipedia article on the ...


8

Arguably, all of Salinger's published stories share the same "universe," which is his own. That said, specific overlap in characters in currently-published works is limited to the stories and novellas that revolve around the Glass family. In publication order, they are: "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" (1948), starring Seymour Glass and his wife Muriel "...


8

Yes, a reader of Wide Sargasso Sea who is unaware of its connection to Jane Eyre is pretty much guaranteed to have missed the entire point of the novel. Jane Eyre is so iconic that Rhys could simply assume knowledge of its plot while writing her own book. The heroine of Wide Sargasso Sea, her husband, and her half-brother are all very important characters ...


7

Yes. The Percy Jackson and the Olympians, The Heroes of Olympus, and The Trials of Apollo are definitely in the same universe – they center on Camp Half-Blood. In The Kane Chronicles, we can conclude that they are in the same universe, given that there are no less than three crossover stories with PJO - The Son of Sobek, The Staff of Serapis, and The Crown ...


7

All of them. By the end of The Dark Tower, it is revealed that the story takes place If you're looking for a list of every explicit reference, Wikipedia had a good list going that you can edit, but this has been deleted. I'm leaving that link in just in case someone recreates that page, but otherwise you can read the list on archive.org.


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There is no consensus among critics about whether Wide Sargasso Sea stands on its own or not. For example, Francis Wyndham wrote in his introduction to the first edition (1966): For many years, Jean Rhys has been haunted by the figure of the first Mrs Rochester—the mad wife in Jane Eyre. The present novel—completed at last after much revision and agonized ...


6

I've just finished reading V for Vendetta in its collected trade paperback edition. At the end, there is a short essay by Alan Moore, titled "Behind the Painted Smile", which explains the creative process behind the book - how it was conceived and how it was executed. Initially, Alan Moore wanted to write a similarly themed comic about a guy called "The ...


6

Once Tolkien revised it, it was (slightly) foreshadowed by the way Bilbo lied about the ring. In the first edition, once Gollum lost the contest, he tried to give Bilbo the ring and was ashamed that he could not I don’t know how many times Gollum begged Bilbo’s pardon. He kept on saying: “We are ssorry; we didn’t mean to cheat, we meant to give it our only ...


5

Let's start by listing the titles of all the Songs, and noting that you can read them in full here. I'll now discuss various possible pairings among these poems, but bear in mind that there's no definitive answer to this. Arguments could be made for many different ways of pairing up, and we're never going to have a perfect bijection. It's almost an exercise ...


5

Yes, Marlfox is a solid part of the Redwall chronology. In the (chronologically) next book, The Taggerung, one subplot of the story revolves around a few Abbey creatures deciphering messages left by the late Abbess Songbreeze, a.k.a. Song, one of the main protagonists of Marlfox. She was an old friend of Cregga (a recurring character through so many Redwall ...


2

Much has been written about these two poems, to the extent that many scholarly publications nowadays simply take it as a given, not needing justification, that "A Prayer for my Daughter" is a follow-up to "The Second Coming". For example, the opening paragraph of Beryl Rowland, "The Other Father in Yeats's “A Prayer for My Daughter”&...


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One of the meanings of “furnace” is: furnace, n. 3. A closed fireplace for heating a building by means of hot-air or hot-water pipes Oxford English Dictionary. (This apparatus is more commonly known as a “boiler”.) So Hughes’ image is of intestines being packed in the abdomen like hot water pipes in a boiler. I think the most plausible way to make sense of ...


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The term intertextuality was introduced in the 1960s by members of the Tel Quel group, who collectively published the volume Théorie d'ensemble in 1968 [1]. In this volume, Philippe Sollers criticises the conception of the (literary) text as something fixed and closed, and proposed the concept of intertextualité (intertextuality) [2]: Tout texte se situe à ...


2

No, not as far as I know of. Most Korean folk tales are similar to European fairy tales in the sense that each story may share similar themes and motifs, the specifics don't seem to relate. I could be wrong, but this seems to be an independent folk tale rather than part of a continuity of a sort. The sun and the moon don't normally make an appearance in most ...


2

Shirin you made as sugar for Perwiz Ferhad shed blood as tears The poet Nizami Ganjavi, who lived in what is now Azerbaijan in the 12th Century, wrote a poem 'Khosrow o Shirin' which is based on a pre-Islamic story from Persian historical epics based on real events. In this story a Persian king, Khosrow II Parviz (I assume this last name is the same name as '...


1

The Corgi Childrens paperback editions of Garry Kilworth’s Thunder Oak (1997), Castle Storm (1998), Windjammer Run (1999), Gaslight Geezers (2001), and Vampire Voles (2002) all carry the quotation ‘A quicker, slicker read than Brian Jacques’ T.E.S. Accordingly, I submit that you mis-remembered the tag line! As far as I can tell, the Corgi Childrens ...


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Sometimes odd lines like that on covers are quotes, even if they aren't attributed. A possible source for this would be the brief review paragraph, by Tynan Laurie, for the 8 cassette recorded book, which appeared in a 1988 edition of Journal called 'Emergency Librarian'. I've not been able to find out much about the journal, but it later became called '...


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I'd argue that they aren't connected. Not because of direct textual evidence, but because of a lack of it. Challenger makes the entire world shake and scream; d uring one of his stories, everyone dies for an hour or two. These are noticeable things - you'd expect them to be mentioned in Holmes stories. That's not to say that they couldn't take place in ...


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I don't think there's stronger evidence than the reasons you lay out; I'm not sure of an interview where Moore explicitly lays out this connection though I don't think he's the kind of author to do so. He's the kind of author to plaster his works with hidden and not so hidden references, homages and the like; I don't think there's a danger of seeing things ...


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