34

According to Wikipedia, Eva Martin's translation was published in 1915. At this period, it is likely that few British readers would have a reason to know the value (in Sterling) of the Russian Rouble (they couldn't just Google the exchange rate!) This statement very clearly places these individuals in society, in a way that saying X roubles would not. ...


20

Something like a duke, and the title wasn't all that special. The English word "prince" is translated from the Russian "knyaz (князь)", which could be used either to denote a member of the royal family or more commonly a member of the nobility. Men directly related to the Tsar were usually called Velikiy Knyaz or Grand Prince instead. &...


7

It looks like this translation isn't quite consistent in its usage of Russian vs British currency units. There are a few cases where farthing is used in a single sentence with rouble: “I have not got a ten-rouble note,” said the prince; “but here is a twenty-five. Change it and give me back the fifteen, or I shall be left without a farthing myself.” Now, ...


3

Whether the translation given, a hair-dresser’s assistant, or a shopkeeper fresh from the barber's which Andra gives, the meaning is that he is dressed like someone in a job inside a shop (protecting him from weather), that pays well (allowing him to dress well), and whose customers are probably (at least in part) well-off and expect service from people ...


1

It's an incorrect translation. Originally it is как приказчик от парикмахера and, for example, a site for learning English using parallel texts offers the following translation: like a shopkeeper fresh from the barber's (*) For me it seems OK, but I'm not a native speaker of either of these two languages. (*) As far as I can find, the site provides no ...


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