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16

My guess: "Can I Get You a Glass of Water? or, Please Close the Glottis after You" by Ogden Nash. which I found on pp. 34-35 of an old hardcover Ogden Nash collection titled You Can't Get There From Here. It's probably the wrong answer, because it's about coughing rather than hiccups and features the word glottis rather than epiglottis. I'm posting ...


9

This passage is assembled (in the common fashion of inspirational texts) from bits and pieces, mostly but not entirely by Emerson. Let’s take it sentence by sentence. One of the illusions is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour. Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly, until ...


8

“City” has its usual meaning, “a large or important municipality” (OED). The tricky word here is “but”, which Byron uses in the sense “nothing but, no more than, only, merely” (OED). So the lines mean that, out of the original population of the enormous city, only two people were left alive: the rest had “famished by degrees” (that is, died of starvation one ...


5

First question: the meaning of "what". "What" used in the sense of "why" or "for what" was not unusual in Early Modern English. E. A. Abbott gives several examples in A Shakespearean Grammar (third edition, 1871), including the following: "What shall I don this robe and trouble you?" (Cymbeline, Act 3, scene ...


5

The lines were written in a letter to one of his daughters and appear on page 489 of volume II of 'A Memoir of Ralph Waldo Emerson by James Elliot Cabot'. However, the extract quoted there is absent the first two lines, so either the letter to his daughter is reproduced elsewhere, that I have not been able to find, of they have been appended by someone else ...


4

It turns out that I should have read the introduction more carefully. Krosyn was, in fact, a small village in Belarus. From the anthology's introduction: In 1828, when a liberalminded Catholic priest opened a parish school in his native village of Krosyn, he found to his surprise and delight that one of the serg-boys Who attended it, the 15-year-old Pauluk ...


4

The history of a Wikipedia article can be investigated using the ‘wikiblame’ tool. This shows that the gloss “(handwriting)” for “palaeographical” was added, along with a couple of other glosses, in this January 2021 edit by ‘Chiswick Chap’. This kind of gloss can be helpful in smoothing the path for readers (avoiding the need to click on the link to the “...


4

Yes, it's the same ABAB pattern. Original on wikisource: Не цурайся мяне, панічок, Што далонь пакрываюць мазолі; Мазоль — працавітых значок, Не заразе цябе ён ніколі.


4

Tsundoku in the other answer suggests that “bereaving” might be used in the sense “spoiling, impairing”, based on this entry in Onions: bereave (the commonest use is ‘to deprive’ a person of a thing, chiefly in pa. pple. bereft) to take away (a thing) from a person 2H6 III.i.85, Oth. I.iii.259, Lucr. 835; always passive. to rob of its strength or beauty, (...


3

In the third stanza, the speaker is describing her memories of the “sweet companions” she played with beneath the tree. The stanza implies that these companions are now dead: the speaker weeps “hot tears” when remembering them; and the tree’s murmur is “dirge-like” and a “lament”. In this context, the “unknown land” must be the afterlife. The comparison of ...


2

I'll caveat this answer with the obvious statement that this what I concluded from searching and reading online in response to the question and not from any deeper or preexisting knowledge of the subject. Taking a starting point of assuming the character speaking in the poem to be, or to represent, Francisak Bahusevic, I began with an assumption that he may ...


2

The poem is about the transition of a veteran from military to civilian life. It is not necessarily about shell shock, which refers to a form of behavioural disorganization that is much more severe than what is expressed in the very regular form of the poem: each of the four first stanzas consists of two lines describing military life, which the next two ...


2

This poem - titled "A callarse" in Spanish, which literally translates as "Be quiet [!]" (exclamation mark mine for emphasis) - can be interpreted as a set of instructions on how to meditate (as in yoga). The phrase "A callarse" might be used by a teacher when addressing a classroom of children, ordering them to quiet down. It ...


1

This line isn't advocating scorning fear. In contrast, it's saying that if we could scorn/reject "hate and pride and fear" - strong emotions that often lead to negative consequences - and if people were born "not to shed a tear", or to not experience sadness, he doesn't know how we could ever achieve close to ("I know not how... we ...


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