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21

Just glossing the last two lines. No want of conscience hold it that I call Her love, for whose dear love I rise and fall. The main difficulty is with “No want of conscience hold it”. This is an anastrophe—a figure of speech in which the normal word order of subject, verb, and object, is changed. Rearranged into the usual order, it becomes an instruction ...


11

Shakespeare's Sonnet 151 is one of his most difficult sonnets. The meaning and logic of the poem are unclear even to scholars. It is also one of the most bawdy poems, not just of the sequence, but in the entire corpus of canonical English literature. As a result, it is hard to explain without some frank terminology. Be warned: this answer has some NSFW ...


8

The phrase “starry pole” is a quotation from Milton’s Paradise Lost, whose book IV describes the life of Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden: Thus, at their shady lodge arrived, both stood, Both turned, and under open sky adored The God that made both sky, air, earth, and heaven, Which they beheld, the moon’s resplendent globe, And starry pole. John Milton (...


7

In sonnet 151, "gentle" Shakespeare equivocates on the meanings of "love" and "conscience", which results in a poem that is unsuitable for readers with Victorian sensibilities. The equivocation begins in the first two lines: Love is too young to know what conscience is; Yet who knows not conscience is born of love? "Love&...


7

A standard meaning of stand by is accompany loyally. This is the only definition provided for the transitive use of that compound verb in Merriam-Webster: transitive verb : to remain loyal or faithful to : DEFEND // stood by his decision The line in question uses the phrase transitively: return stands by disdain. It can be explained: Do not follow a path ...


7

After spending way too much time on this, I finally found it! Welcom be ye whan ye go, And farewell whan ye come; So faire as ye there be no mo As brighte as bery broune. I love you verrily at my to, Nonne so moche in all this toune; I am right glad when ye will go, And sory when ye will come. And whan ye be other fare, I pray for you sertaine, That never ...


6

It stands for Atomic Energy Commission, commonly known as A.E.C. In the real world, Edward Teller was an early member of the Manhattan Project, sometimes called "the father of the hydrogen bomb", and he was involved with the Atomic Energy Commission including proposing projects and testifying against Oppenheimer in their security clearance ...


5

The ode is titled ‘To Autumn’, which means that it is addressed to Autumn, as if the season were a person capable of listening to the speaker. This personification is clearest in the second stanza, where the speaker directly addresses Autumn as “thee”: Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?     Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find Thee sitting ...


5

Lines three and four can be paraphrased as follows: Do not hasten too fast at that gate Where, returning through it, you will get other people's disdain. None of the meanings of "stand" or "stand by" in A Shakespeare Glossary by C. T. Onions (revised by Robert D. Eagleson, Oxford University Press, 1986) seem to match the intended ...


5

Keats’ debt to Milton in these lines was well observed. But Keats was not the only poet to borrow from Milton’s description of the swan! Borrowing from Milton It was probably Milton who first wrote (at any rate in English) that “The swan with arched neck Rows her state with oary feet;” but Keats has “The swan, his neck of arched snow, Oars himself along ...


5

"Woman Work" depicts women's unpaid labor as a form of slavery. Slaves by definition are dispossessed of the right to own anything. The poem's word choice and imagery are carefully deployed to show how and why the woman can call only the stars and the moonlight her own. In the first stanza, the speaker lays out a litany of chores that are typically ...


5

Shelley wrote, in his preface to Adonais: An Elegy on the Death of John Keats, that the critique directed against Keats's poem Endymion was enough to bring about his sudden death at the age of 25: The genius of the lamented person to whose memory I have dedicated these unworthy verses, was not less delicate and fragile than it was beautiful; and where ...


5

Introduction: Braithwaite's nonce definition of "Georgian Verse" In his preface to the book you're asking about, The Book of Georgian Verse, the anthologist William Stanley Braithwaite explains what he means by the term "Georgian": This anthology, according to the editor's intention, includes those poets born under the four Georges, who ...


5

The quatrain is the last stanza of the poem Gesang der Geister über den Wassern, which Goethe wrote in 1779 during a stay in Switzerland. The poem was inspired by the Staubbach Falls near the village of Lauterbrunnen. In order to understand the comparisons in the last stanza, it is helpful to discuss what the poem is about. The first stanza compares the ...


4

There were indeed some devices that held rushlights vertically. In A Handbook for East-Bourne and Seaford, and the Neighbourhood (1885), G. F. Chambers provides the following figure: He writes: Figs. 3 and 4 represent relics of bygone ages, still occasionally seen in Sussex. ... The rude iron frame has a still under-spring, which keeps the rush in an (...


4

tl;dr It's a literal translation of the French idiomatic construction hommes en nous, which would typically be translated, simply, men. In French it implies a congregate body, so fellow members would also be a sensible, if not literal, translation. There is a certain sense of mutuality and group identity: amongst ourselves is part of the implication. The ...


3

Readers should know at least two things about "Corona": it alludes to Rainer Maria Rilke's poem Herbsttag [1] and it is a love poem about Celan and Ingeborg Bachmann. There are several echos and parallels between between Rilke's "Herbsttag" / "Autumn Day" and "Corona". The most obvious one is the words "es ist ...


3

"Light Brigade" refers to a specific brigade The Charge of the Light Brigade was a real-world event. Quoting from Wikipedia: The Charge of the Light Brigade was a failed military action involving the British light cavalry led by Lord Cardigan against Russian forces during the Battle of Balaclava on 25 October 1854 in the Crimean War. The poem was ...


2

One of the meanings of “furnace” is: furnace, n. 3. A closed fireplace for heating a building by means of hot-air or hot-water pipes Oxford English Dictionary. (This apparatus is more commonly known as a “boiler”.) So Hughes’ image is of intestines being packed in the abdomen like hot water pipes in a boiler. I think the most plausible way to make sense of ...


2

Baldick defines Georgian poetry as (emphasis added) a body of English verse published in the first half of George V's reign (1910–36) in five anthologies edited by Edward Marsh as Georgian Poetry (1912–22). (...) The term Georgian is only rarely applied to the literature of the period of the first four Georges (1714–1830). Applying the term "Georgian&...


2

You are correct that this is not personification. Personification is when an abstract or inanimate entity is represented as a human figure, for example the embodiment of "Rumor, painted full of tongues" that opens Shakespeare's 2 Henry VI. To the best of my knowledge, there is no specific rhetorical device that involves the reverse: identifying a ...


2

As an explanation, it's worth including the next few lines of the introduction as well: What manner I mean, will be quite clear to the reader, who must soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a feverish attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the two last, I feel sensible are not of such ...


2

Much has been written about these two poems, to the extent that many scholarly publications nowadays simply take it as a given, not needing justification, that "A Prayer for my Daughter" is a follow-up to "The Second Coming". For example, the opening paragraph of Beryl Rowland, "The Other Father in Yeats's “A Prayer for My Daughter”&...


2

There's plenty of ways how a pleasant thought can bring sad thoughts to mind but in this context, Wordsworth is grieving the condition of humanity. As the proceeding lines below state, To her fair works did Nature link The human soul that through me ran; And much it grieved my heart to think What man has made of man. And again, at the last stanza, ...


2

I was doing some research on this poem from the same article. While I don't know much about the author, I do know a bit about dialect poetry. In the mid to late 19th century, both white and black authors produced literature in African American dialect. White authors used this as a way to "other" African Americans, and the subject of the literature ...


2

A quick Google Translate of the original verse confirms that the original also addressed the reader Maybe I'm totally missing something here but as a german native speaker, I'd doubt that the narrator adresses the reader here. Contextually, the remaining soldiers of the story are still on focus. It's a rhetorical device, bringing the reader from a quite ...


1

The most famous ladder in the Bible is Jacob's ladder in Genesis 28 (here quoted from the New King James Version): Now Jacob went out from Beersheba and went toward Haran. So he came to a certain place and stayed there all night, because the sun had set. And he took one of the stones of that place and put it at his head, and he lay down in that place to ...


1

Here is my analysis of the poem: This 22-line poem is constructed in iambic tetrameter rhyming couplets. Anyone who has studied Shakespeare will know the structure of his iambic pentameter and its biological association with a heartbeat. Poe’s use of iambic tetrameter is similar in nature and fitting structure for a poem that is, arguably, about life. With ...


1

The meaning of "inward eye" is suggested by the other lines: when the poet is lying on his couch, alone, and begins to daydream, the daffodils become visible again in his imagination. In a sense, this is also true from a biographical point of view. In his edition of Wordsworth's major poems, Stephen Gill notes that the poem was composed in the ...


1

There are three basic meanings of "verse": A line of metrical writing. Strictly speaking, this term should refer to a single line. To avoid confusion with the second meaning (below), "it is preferable to call a line a line and a stanza a stanza" (Baldick, page 271). A stanza, especially in a hymn or a song. This may cause confusion with ...


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