17

Vowels in Hebrew - called n'kudot - are written as dots and lines surrounding the letters. In an actual Torah - written on parchment - these symbols aren't there. As an example, here's a picture of a book called a "tikkun", which is used to help learn the chanting for the traditional way to read the Torah: On the right side is text with ...


16

As other answers have mentioned, what is meant is simply what is said: many renderings of the Torah leave out the vowel markers (and punctuation). As several comments have offered, this is a common feature of a lot of Hebrew text, and more broadly, is found in quite a few languages (off the top of my head, I believe Arabic is also often written this way, and ...


13

The relevant passsage in the Bible is easy enough to find: it is Ecclesiates 4:12 (see Bible Hub): And if one prevail against him, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is not quickly broken. (King James Bible) Findng the (possibly) corresponding passage in the Epic of Gilgamesh took a bit more effort. Apparently, there is a close verbal parallel ...


12

It's a mispronunciation of Doré Bible. The mispronunciation is quite natural: to an English speaker's eye, Doré looks like "Dore", which would be a homophone of "door" in English. It also fits with the context (images), since Doré's contribution was as an illustrator and not a translator for the Bible. How I found this answer (because it's interesting) As ...


6

How much does this poem differ from the Bible story? The poem appears to be mostly consistent with the original Biblical story (starting with Gen. 22:3, through part of Gen. 22:13). As to your three bulleted points: "took the fire with him, and a knife" is, indeed, part of the story (Gen. 22:6). The only thing Abraham built was an altar (Gen. 22:9)...


4

In an article in Haaretz, Elon Gilad and Ruth Schuster write: The “marble arch” may allude to Titus’ Victory Arch in Rome, a monument celebrating the Roman final victory over the Jews. If so, Cohen is comparing his lover to the Roman victors and himself to the devastated Jews, who had just lost their Temple. Like the revolt, he is crushed.


4

Someone in the comments gave this interpretation: There's not much confusion if you look at the quotes in context. This quote comes after he has been nailed to the cross and has spent several hours being tortured. Passersby are insulting him and saying "If you're really the son of God, get down off the cross yourself! Perform a miracle!" He can't. ...


4

The only direct description of an angel in the Bible is in Revelation 10:1 (emphasis added): And I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud, and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire Angels are also sometimes described in other Bible verses as having "glory" (e.g.,...


3

Possibly the reference to seeing her flag on the marble arch refers to seeing her conquered, or taken, by another? Since the following line is "Our love is not a victory march" - A victory march for one, implies a defeat for another. I can't speak to which arch may have been intended, but I think this interpretation fits with the other themes in the song.


3

I don't think Cohen has ever made this clear, so we can only speculate. While I agree that the Arch of Titus makes the most sense, three other candidates jump out at me: Washington Square Arch in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, NYC, the city Cohen was in when he wrote Hallelujah. Soldiers marched under this arch at the New York City Victory Parade of 1946 (...


3

Walther Sallaberger's book Das Gilgamesch-Epos. Mythos, Werk und Tradition (C. H. Beck, 2008) discusses the flood story mainly in the context of the Standard Babylonian version of the Gilgamesh Epic. This is the version whose redaction is attributed to Sîn-lēqi-unninni and which Sallaberger dates to the 11th century BC. There is no evidence that the flood ...


2

"cast a bank" means to build a ramp. This is the archaic meaning of "cast" as in item 1, subitem 9 here: (archaic) To throw up, as a mound, or rampart. Bible, Luke xix.48 Thine enemies shall cast a trench [bank] about thee. And the meaning of "bank" as in a bank of something, as in item 2 here: A long, high mass or mound of a ...


1

The vowel pointing was added about 600 AD. There are two speculations as to why: To make the pronunciation easier. To hide allusions to Christ which exist when applying the 32 rules of Rabbi Eliezer. #1 doesn't make much sense since vowels are not used in Modern Hebrew newspapers. #2 has the strength of argument in that the Jews who rejected Christ had ...


1

The article Kinderbijbel ("children's bible") in the Dutch Wikipedia is not much more than a stub; it contains nothing on the history of children's bibles in Dutch. The article Bijbelvertalingen (bible translations) claims that professor Johannes van der Palm (1763 - 1840) published the first children's bible in Dutch: Bijbel voor de jeugd. Tafereelen uit de ...


1

Yes and no. Yes because he resembles the great prostitute in the way that he misguided the whole world. But no because most of the characters in the Chronicles of Narnia don't primarily represent their biblical archetype but rather, as in Lewis' The Screwtape Letters the different ways human psychology can go to. That's because Narnia was indeed written to ...


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