29 votes

What translation/version of the Bible would Chaucer have read?

Chaucer (almost certainly) used the Vulgate, the 4th-century Latin translation by Jerome, the text that was the usual scripture of the Catholic Church in the medieval period. I added the caveat “...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
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20 votes
Accepted

The Torah is written without vowels?

As other answers have mentioned, what is meant is simply what is said: many renderings of the Torah leave out the vowel markers (and punctuation). As several comments have offered, this is a common ...
KRyan's user avatar
  • 443
19 votes

The Torah is written without vowels?

Vowels in Hebrew - called n'kudot - are written as dots and lines surrounding the letters. In an actual Torah - written on parchment - these symbols aren't there. As an example, here's a picture of a ...
Mithical's user avatar
  • 23.3k
17 votes

Do the Bible and the Epic of Gilgamesh really contain the same rare proverb about the strength of a triple-stranded rope?

The relevant passage in the Bible is easy enough to find: it is Ecclesiates 4:12 (see Bible Hub): And if one prevail against him, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is not quickly broken. (...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 44k
13 votes
Accepted

In The Mezzotint by M. R. James, what is a "Door Bible"?

It's a mispronunciation of Doré Bible. The mispronunciation is quite natural: to an English speaker's eye, Doré looks like "Dore", which would be a homophone of "door" in English. It also fits with ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 71.1k
13 votes

Did the Lord of the Flies have any kind of religious reference more specific than just the Devil?

The entire book can be seen as an allegory for the Bible. It has a startlingly large number of allusions to Jewish and Christian myths and stories. Here are some of them: The island, in the ...
CHEESE's user avatar
  • 4,412
9 votes

Of what veil does Thoreau speak and what does he mean by being missing in this passage from "A Plea for Captain John Brown"?

User @MattThrower is correct regarding the "tearing of the veil"--a Biblical allusion indicating a significant death. This answer elaborates a bit more on the context and why Thoreau is ...
Tiercelet's user avatar
  • 311
9 votes
Accepted

"That Christ deny’d divorce to his own", what does Milton mean here in this phrase from "The Doctrine & Discipline of Divorce"?

By his own, Milton means the apostles. The context of both Matthew and Mark makes this clear. The Pharisees ask Jesus about divorce. Jesus replies that given what Moses said, divorce cannot be ...
verbose's user avatar
  • 22.1k
8 votes

Which flood story was first: Genesis or The Epic of Gilgamesh?

Walther Sallaberger's book Das Gilgamesch-Epos. Mythos, Werk und Tradition (C. H. Beck, 2008) discusses the flood story mainly in the context of the Standard Babylonian version of the Gilgamesh Epic. ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 44k
7 votes

Literary genres of Mark and Q in the two-document hypothesis?

There is a lot to unpack here, and it can be difficult to explain everything that you're actually wanting to know unless you have a baseline of knowledge of Mark and Q scholarship. So instead of ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 1,037
7 votes

Did the Lord of the Flies have any kind of religious reference more specific than just the Devil?

Existing answers have covered a few of these concepts, but there was plenty of Christian iconography apart from the devil who promoted evil among mankind. The island itself, particularly Simon's ...
Parallax Sugar's user avatar
7 votes

Of what veil does Thoreau speak and what does he mean by being missing in this passage from "A Plea for Captain John Brown"?

The reference to the temple veil is an allusion to the Biblical story that the veil in the temple in Jerusalem which separated the two holiest rooms in the temple was torn at the moment of Christ's ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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6 votes

Did the Lord of the Flies have any kind of religious reference more specific than just the Devil?

The allusions mentioned above are true in some regard; although, some clarity could be made about the Christian idea of sin. Christianity affirms that each individual has the choice of, even the ...
R.D.'s user avatar
  • 61
6 votes

Why is Jesus upset with God?

Any analysis of this line needs to begin with the understanding that "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?" is a direct quotation of (and thus a reference to) Psalms 22. Psalm 22 begins ...
ScholarlyFool's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How much does "The Parable of the Old Man and the Young" differ from the original Bible story?

How much does this poem differ from the Bible story? The poem appears to be mostly consistent with the original Biblical story (starting with Gen. 22:3, through part of Gen. 22:13). As to your three ...
Shokhet's user avatar
  • 5,930
5 votes

Why does Nick say that Moses was 130 years old when he died?

Jeffrey Archer is a convicted perjurer, with a long record of, at the very least, embroidering his lifestory (claiming to have attended a prestigious public school, been an undergraduate at Oxford ...
mikado's user avatar
  • 1,959
4 votes
Accepted

Are angels ever depicted as having golden halos floating above their heads in the Bible?

The only direct description of an angel in the Bible is in Revelation 10:1 (emphasis added): And I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud, and a rainbow was upon his ...
Nathaniel Irvin's user avatar
4 votes

"I've seen your flag on the marble arch"

In an article in Haaretz, Elon Gilad and Ruth Schuster write: The “marble arch” may allude to Titus’ Victory Arch in Rome, a monument celebrating the Roman final victory over the Jews. If so, ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 3,198
3 votes

"I've seen your flag on the marble arch"

Possibly the reference to seeing her flag on the marble arch refers to seeing her conquered, or taken, by another? Since the following line is "Our love is not a victory march" - A victory march for ...
Fair to Middlin''s user avatar
3 votes

"I've seen your flag on the marble arch"

I don't think Cohen has ever made this clear, so we can only speculate. While I agree that the Arch of Titus makes the most sense, three other candidates jump out at me: Washington Square Arch in ...
Gaurav's user avatar
  • 1,700
2 votes
Accepted

What is the meaning of 'cast a bank'?

"cast a bank" means to build a ramp. This is the archaic meaning of "cast" as in item 1, subitem 9 here: (archaic) To throw up, as a mound, or rampart. Bible, Luke xix.48 Thine ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 71.1k
2 votes

Does Puzzle the Donkey have an allegorical relationship with any entity in the Book of Revelation or the Bible at large?

Yes and no. Yes because he resembles the great prostitute in the way that he misguided the whole world. But no because most of the characters in the Chronicles of Narnia don't primarily represent ...
foggy's user avatar
  • 411
2 votes

What translation/version of the Bible would Chaucer have read?

Gareth Rees's answer has given a very nice, detailed summary of analysis by Landrum (1924) and also mentions Skeat, who was earlier. I just want to point out in this answer that there may be another ...
kjfshgsjkdf's user avatar
1 vote

What translation/version of the Bible would Chaucer have read?

Chaucer was an educated man who would certainly have read the Bible in Latin. Interestingly, the date of Wycliffe's translation into English of parts of the New Testament more or less coincides with ...
mikado's user avatar
  • 1,959

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