21

It's a Biblical reference. Noting that Macbeth is speaking of his own hands, and his own fears, How is ’t with me when every noise appals me? it is clear that this is an allusion to Matthew chapter 18, which speaks metaphorically of removing one's own bodyparts if they should bring you to sin. Wherefore if thy hand or thy foot offend thee, cut them ...


15

Possibly the Bible? From Matthew 18:9: And if thine eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: it is better for thee to enter into life with one eye, rather than having two eyes to be cast into hell fire.


11

The entire book can be seen as an allegory for the Bible. It has a startlingly large number of allusions to Jewish and Christian myths and stories. Here are some of them: The island, in the beginning, is a parallel for the Garden of Eden Ralph's first act upon reaching the island is to take off his clothes and jump into the water. This symbolizes the ...


10

Looking at Swami Krishnananda's book on The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad (emphasis mine): This instruction, which was communicated to the Devas, Manushyās and Asuras – gods, men and demons – by the single letter Da repeated three times, meaning Dāmyata, Datta, Dayadhvam – be self-controlled, be charitable and be compassionate, is applicable to all ...


10

It is a reference to the English class system. Lady Bracknell, a stickler for propriety, is suggesting that the Liberals are lower class than herself. The lower classes don't dine in the evening, they merely eat a meal. Dinner was as much an institution as a simple meal. One dresses for dinner, is summoned by one's butler and is served by one's footmen. ...


10

I think it does refer to the episode from The Aeneid. I say this with confidence because there are many classical references. First, there is the name Byzantium, the Latin name for the city (Greek: Byzantion). Next, there is a reference to Grecian goldsmiths, which is not surprising, as the city was Greek from about 660 BC to the 2nd century CE. Additionally,...


7

According to an interview (link) with surviving band member Joe Fletcher, "Mabel Grey" is in reference to a real ship of the same name, but was written by the late David Lamb and details about the inspiring shipwreck are unknown by anyone except possibly Lamb's wife. Is David Lamb the original writer of that song? He is. He actually co-wrote it with ...


7

The OP states that the source is hard to spell. That can't apply to the Bible. A classical character who actually blinds himself is Oedipus. His crime is the same as the one Macbeth contemplates--regicide, or murdering the king. Shakespeare's audience would be familiar with the story of Oedipus and with the constant reminders about the evils of regicide. ...


6

There is indeed a resonance with Norse mythology. In Völuspá, stanza 39 according to Codex Regius, or 24 according to Hauksbók (there are otherwise only variations of tense between them in this stanza), we are told of a giantess in an eastern forest, giving birth to a brood of wolves: The giantess old in Ironwood sat, In the east, and bore ...


6

There really aren't that many authorship debates, since an author's name will usually become associated with a story whether or not they actually wrote the work in question --- such as Homer (leading to the Homeric Question) or Aesop --- and with the invention of the printing press, they'd usually get their names on the cover to boot. Pretty much the only ...


6

Random Harvest (1942) has many of the elements mentioned in Catcher in the Rye: The hero is an English officer who was wounded in the First World War and lost his memories. He meets and falls in love with a woman. He becomes a writer. He recovers his original (pre-war) memories when his head is struck accidentally. When he recovers his pre-war memories he ...


6

Apparently ’euoi’ is a ‘cry of impassioned rapture in ancient Bacchic revels’, per wiktionary and ‘Euan’ or ‘Euhan’ is a Latin name for Bacchus, per Notre Dame University.


5

This is conjectural, but just before the passage in question, Camus writes something like We sail across spaces so vast they seem unending. Sun and moon rise and fall in turn, on the same thread of light and night. Days at sea, as similar each to the other as happiness . . . which to me echos some (but not all) of this passage in R. L. Stevenson's In the ...


5

Cú Chulainn is a famous character from Irish myth, and the accidental slaying of his son is part of the legend. On Baile's Strand is a retelling of parts of the myth, with some added subplots and comedy. Yeats, being Irish, would have presumed his audience was familiar with the rest of the story already. In the myth, the young Cú Chulainn travels to ...


5

To add to muru's excellent answer, taking on the "why" part of the question, this final part of Eliot's poem presents us with a world in ruins, not as much in substance as in spirit. The prevailing intention I think, is to depict spiritual emptiness: with the invocation of the biblical crucifixion with no resurrection, the depiction of the Grail with towers ...


5

This comes from Confucius, in his Analects, 9.26. The Master said: “You can snatch away the general of a large army, but you cannot snatch away the will of even the lowliest of men.” This connection is made in Bill McKibben's edition of Walden, page 307.


5

Existing answers have covered a few of these concepts, but there was plenty of Christian iconography apart from the devil who promoted evil among mankind. The island itself, particularly Simon's glade, functions as a kind of Garden of Eden that is gradually corrupted by the introduction of evil. Simon's glade turns into a kind of church because of him. ...


5

Keats’ debt to Milton in these lines was well observed. But Keats was not the only poet to borrow from Milton’s description of the swan! Borrowing from Milton It was probably Milton who first wrote (at any rate in English) that “The swan with arched neck Rows her state with oary feet;” but Keats has “The swan, his neck of arched snow, Oars himself along ...


4

The allusions mentioned above are true in some regard; although, some clarity could be made about the Christian idea of sin. Christianity affirms that each individual has the choice of, even the propensity to, sin; but that sin is always a product of choice, even when tempted by the devil (in our story, "The Lord of the Flies"). Therefore, Simon's ...


4

The idea of surveillance by governments and of a privileged caste demanding and receiving privacy isn't unique to Orwell, but that scene certainly does sound as though it's pretty much a “straight lift”. From 1984, Book Two, Chapter Eight: As O’Brien passed the telescreen a thought seemed to strike him. He stopped, turned aside and pressed a switch on the ...


4

This excerpt: Montag shook his head. He looked at a blank wall. The girl's face was there, really quite beautiful in memory: astonishing, in fact. She had a very thin face like the dial of a small clock seen faintly in a dark room in the middle of a night when you waken to see the time and see the clock telling you the hour and the minute and the second, ...


4

In his answer, Peter Shor has set out the wording in the text of Adonais that suggests the identification of the mourners. But we don’t have to rely only on the text: there is also the epitext, the “textual materials that derive from a published work, e.g. reviews, interviews, etc., that contextualize the work and shape its public reception” (OED). In the ...


4

This is partially explained in the Project Gutenberg edition of Adonais. I believe you've misidentified the sections of the poem that refer to Byron and Moore, respectively. Byron is described in: The Pilgrim of Eternity, whose fame Over his living head like Heaven is bent, An early but enduring monument, Came, veiling all the lightnings of his song In ...


3

"Tweet" has the structure of a Twitter thread, where a tweeter posts a series of linked tweets. Each verse alludes to tropes or specific works in a highly compressed and effective way. The poem's wide frame of reference allows Jarosinski to deepen his explorations of the personal, social, and cultural phenomenon that is Twitter. The second stanza ...


3

tl;dr Tagore's progressive take on the plight of widows rebukes Chatterjee's retrograde portrayal of widow remarriage. Introduction Like Rabindranath Tagore's চোখের বালি / chokher baali "A Speck of Sand in the Eye" (1903), Bankim Chandra Chatterjee's novel বিষবৃক্ষ / viShavR^ikSha, "The Poison Tree" (1873) takes as its subject the ...


3

The quoted sentence is a piece of rhetoric in which Michael Herr belittles Operation Pegasus by proxy, distancing himself from the criticism by placing it in the mouth of Stendhal, who is a convenient spokesman because he’s dead and can’t complain about being misrepresented. An “outpost” is “a detachment of soldiers situated at a distance from the main body ...


3

I am not convinced that "mere vessels of happiness" is in fact a "famous image" as claimed by Benatar. If it were famous then I would expect to be able to find more instances of the image using tools like Google Book Search or Google Scholar, but I have been unable to do so. The closest that I have been able to find is in Singer (1981): But pure ...


2

I propose Jerome K. Jerome's "The New Utopia" (1891), which can be read online. Story similarities In this story, the narrator is a man who falls asleep and misses "the great social revolution of 1899", remaining asleep (and preserved in a glass case at the Museum of Curiosities) for one thousand years until he awakes in the 29th century. This far-distant ...


2

As muru mentioned in his answer, the Upanishad Eliot is referencing is the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad. Eliot added the following footnote: “Datta, dayadhvam, damyata” (Give, sympathise, control). The fable of the meaning of the Thunder is found in the Brihadaranyaka—Upanishad, 5, 1. A translation is found in Deussen's Sechsig Upanishads des Veda, p. 489. I ...


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