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28

One of the big problems in written English is representing spoken conversation. When someone speaks, they typically emphasize certain words. HTML even provides a tag for this: The placement of stress emphasis changes the meaning of the sentence. The element thus forms an integral part of the content. The precise way in which stress is used in this way ...


24

The context is that Lucy is “’ollerin’ and carryin’ on” (that is, crying) because she is unhappy at the prospect of killing the rabbit: Lucy began to cry. She had not lived all her life on a farm for nothing and she knew very well that everything her father had said was right. But she was upset by the idea of killing the rabbit in cold blood. Richard Adams (...


20

“Three-part” means “three-quarter”: three-part, adj. b. = three parts, n. three parts, n. Three out of four equal parts, three quarters. Oxford English Dictionary. “Three-quarter moon” means “gibbous moon”, that is, a moon that is more than half but less than fully illuminated. A citation for this sense: the greater part of the bright side is seen, and it ...


17

Quoting Wikipedia After the outbreak of World War I the Defence of the Realm Act was passed by Parliament in 1914. One section of the Act concerned the hours pubs could sell alcohol, as it was believed that alcohol consumption would interfere with the war effort. It restricted opening hours for licensed premises to luncheon (12:00 to 14:40) and supper (18:...


13

You're right, "I'm glad you think it's funny" is used sarcastically. It is almost always used in that way. For example, if I trip and fall and you start laughing, I might say to you: "I'm glad you think it's funny." Presumably Athena is laughing at Dexter's having been caught in a tedious conversation, and he is responding to her laughter ...


9

nut, n. 6.c. British slang. A fashionable or showy young man. Cf. knut n., nutty adj. 4. Obsolete. 1904   in Notes & Queries (1913) 26 July 78/1   I'm one of the nuts, one of the nibs. 1913   Punch 12 Feb. 115/1   Spring socks will be black and Spring ties a quiet blue. A strike of nuts is expected at any moment. 1920   W. J. Locke House of Baltazar xvii....


9

The Oxford English Dictionary gives the following definition for 'Drumstick': Used of a person. Obsolete. The precise implication of this use in the 17th cent. is unclear, although with quot. 1602 cf. drum n.1 2b. Later examples generally have some implication of thinness or tallness. None of the examples given are as late as the setting of the ...


7

In context, it surely means clearing phlegm from the throat and spitting. There are a few meanings of the word "hawk", but just two main meanings (or collections of related meanings) as an intransitive verb, and one of them doesn't really fit here: to hunt birds by means of a trained hawk (see hawk entry 1 sense 1) : to practice falconry to soar ...


6

Walkinshaw has just said that the two men who were with Markenmore were strangers. Chilford's response is: You cannot be sure they were strangers. Markenmore might have known them from before, as he has business dealings with a wide range of people. You are assuming that Markenmore came to this area to meet his brother and sister. But it is equally probable ...


6

To make sense of the last lines, it might be proper to put them in thematic context of the first lines. This somewhat cryptic poem manages to succinctly weave together three different themes: women’s rights; slavery; and (in terms of Christian theology) the doctrine of man. Some external evidence would be the time period in which Dickinson lived (1830-1886) ...


5

A duke was (and is) normally the owner of large estates, and thus this indicates both the body and soul are valuable properties. The frontier is what would appear at the boundary of the estate -- hence, beyond the body and soul there is God, immediately.


5

Both parts of the phrase here are used in their dictionary meaning, but in a sarcastically sadistic manner, as with many things with Bonhart. "To take pains" means to try very hard. One would think Bonhart was referring to having to cut the group's heads off and whatnot, but it's hardly a lot of work for him - he had just killed them all very ...


5

My reading of it is that it is a wry jab at the 'sort of people who make laws about lighting bicycle lamps'. The narrator judges them to be bossy sort of people who like their word to be law. Hence if the sun did not set at its appointed time they would demand that the sun provide them with an adequate explanation of his aberrant behaviour. The rules ...


4

These lines are examples of metaphors - a figure of speech that equates two things for the purposes of comparison or symbolism, without the two being literally the same. The towel on the washing line is not literally a matador's cape, but the poem gives us the image that it is moving in the same way, thanks to the wind. The movement in the wind of each piece ...


4

The words "access" and "excess" ultimately derive from Latin. The Online Etymology Dictionary has the following entry for access (emphasis added): (...), from Old French acces "onslaught, attack; onset (of an illness)" (14c.), from Latin accessus "a coming to, an approach; way of approach, entrance," noun use of past ...


4

Vicki observes that Dexter eats in an incredibly sloppy, even disgusting, way. She thinks that the worst thing about the entire situation is the way he eats; he could not possibly be any more off-putting. Nothing at all could match the awfulness of his table manners. So you are correct: Vicki is thinking that "now things can only get better," ...


4

It may have a double meaning. Perverse can iteslf mean showing a deliberate and obstinate desire to behave in a way that is unreasonable or unacceptable and contrary to the accepted or expected standard or practice. (both definitions from Oxford Languages via Google) Depictions of the Madonna predominantly show her with downcast eyes either in modesty or ...


3

This is meant sarcastically. A more accurate word than sarcasm would be antiphrasis. Antiphrasis is the rhetorical device of saying the opposite of what is actually meant in such a way that it is obvious what the true intention is.


3

This is Australian spoken English and the phrase is fairly common. I would argue "I'm glad you think it's funny" in this context is meant both ways by the character. It's both "I'm glad you think it's funny" [because I don't] and "I'm glad you think it's funny" [because at least one person got enjoyment out of it]. They're not ...


3

Bluntschli has spent fifteen years as a soldier, in "barracks and battles". He has lived a life of adventure, which for him has been a serious business, with his very life frequently at risk. He suggests that Raina, being much younger than he is, has "her imagination full of fairy princes and noble natures and cavalry charges and goodness ...


3

TW: suicide The lines mean: If you have a stone, then you no longer need to wonder about whether you're still going to drown. That is to say, if there is doubt about whether you're going to drown, then a stone can take away the guesswork. The reference is to the habit suicides have of weighing their pockets down with stones so that they cannot float to the ...


3

A settlement of six thousand pounds at four and a half per cent means that £6,000 has been invested at a return of 4.5% interest on the capital. The interest is paid out to the investor, whoever the person the investor has ‘settled’ it on. In this case it is Mrs Larne who is so ‘entitled’. The lady is about to receive the first of her quarterly ...


3

I think the sentence refers back to what was said just a little earlier. Phyllis said "Don't be foolish. Sit down. Isn't washing one's head awful?" So I think when she says "You are--aren't you?" she means to say "You are foolish, aren't you?". She's making fun of his feeble answer. I think it makes sense because she was also ...


3

‘Things can only get better’ is a general phrase expressing optimism for the future after bad experiences. Similar to ‘the only way is up’, it expresses the view that the worst is past and improving circumstances are inevitable. This is a standard phrase with no particular special meaning in context. (Edit: Having dug about a bit more at the plot of this ...


2

According to Cassell's Dictionary of Slang, skimmish is a variant of skimish, which means beer or alcohol. skimish n. (also skimmish) [1900s-70s] (mainly tramp) beer, alcohol; thus skimisher/skimmisher, a heavy drinker. [Shelta skimis, to drink, skimisk, drunk] The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang agrees: skimish /ˈskɪmɪʃ/ noun Alcoholic drink. 1908–. J....


2

Here’s another translation of I.206: While he [Cyrus] was busied about this labour [that is, bridging the Araxes], Tomyris sent a herald and said thus: “O king of the Medes, cease to press forward the work which thou art now pressing forward; for thou canst not tell whether these things will be in the end for thy advantage or no; cease to do so, I say, and ...


2

A couple of points in the question need clarification. First, Elinor's thoughts are not about Marianne's reaction to Willoughby's letter. They are in response to Marianne's view of Mrs Jennings, their well-intentioned but interfering hostess in London. Marianne is convinced that Mrs Jennings' kindly interest in her situation is simply driven by a desire for ...


2

Exactly. An "imbalance" would indicate a lack of proportion -- he loved her much more than she loved him. I would say -- in view of the "knit meaning" -- that he used the past to interpret his present, so that it did not seem pointless and meaningless. This may not solve problems but it would lend them significance. The anecdotes do ...


2

Both phrases are borrowed from Frank Hamilton Cushing's Zuñi Folk Tales (G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1901). Below is a passage that uses the word "háni" (in Átahsaia, the cannibal demon): One bright morning in summer-time, the elder sister called to the younger, "Háni!" "What sayest thou?" said the háni. Based on this, háni would ...


2

I don't think Crow is the subject of a judicial scene. The title "Examination at the Womb-Door" suggests that Crow is being tested before he can be born. The last line, "Pass, Crow," reveals that Crow has passed the test and is able to pass the gate into birth. The questions, then, aren't mocking or moral in nature. They are existential. ...


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