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19

G--- is an anonymised place name. It was quite common practice in a certain period of English literature to obscure place names in this way, so that a place could be described in a general way without having to locate it specifically either as a real place or an invented name. I've written more about this practice and the reasons for it here: Why are place ...


15

Going on to the next sentence makes clear the context: the narrator is so nearsighted that he usually needs to use glasses or contact lenses to see properly. When he's at the beach, however, he doesn't like to wear either glasses or contact lenses. Glasses are not mentioned explicitly in the passage you quoted (only in the next sentence), although contact ...


9

‘Fancied’ here has the meaning ‘was inclined to believe’ or ‘thought it a possibility’. ‘One’ is effectively being used as a pronoun, meaning ‘I’. General MacArthur is talking to, and about, himself in a superficially formal and depersonalising way. ‘Queerly’ just means ‘oddly’. The dash indicates a brief hiatus in the speech or thought. So the whole ‘ One ...


8

It could be less about the period and more about the specific social/cultural context. According to this BBC interview with sports historian Tony Collins (who has written multiple books on the history of rugby), professional rugby player Tony Marchant, and Trever Gibbons (rugby league writer): TONY COLLINS: I mean the other thing that I, I found amazing ...


7

"dread" - being frightened that something worrying would happen "rapture" - ecstasy - but can also mean "a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion" From my point of view, the thieves were not happy. Instead, they were carried away by the overwhelming fear they felt when Mr. Jaggers had eye contact with them. Mr. ...


6

Since the narrator of this excerpt is near-sighted, he needs either glasses or contact lenses to see things sharply, especially at a distance. Wearing glasses would cover part of his face, so it would not get the same tan as the rest of his face. (For an illustration of this effect, see the article Learn From the Burn to Ban the Tan by Scott LaFee (School of ...


6

According to the OED, the intransitive verb "to bathe" means "to take a bath; or to plunge or immerse oneself in water or other liquid, so as to enjoy its influence". "To bath" has also been used in the same way. The examples given include: 1765 W. Cowper: It is a noble Stream to bath in. 1863 A. P. Stanley: The princess came ...


6

He's reflecting on a memory from 50 years ago (it might not be exactly 50 with poetic license). And, at the time of the story, his father has been dead for thirty years. The specific memory he's recalling is mentioned in the following text: Why did he feel so awake tonight? He slipped back in time, as he did so easily nowadays. He was fifteen years old and ...


5

“B.A.” is Lady Montdore’s mistake. That is, she attempts to use the current slang, but gets it wrong. This is indicated by Lady Patricia’s reply, in which she corrects her friend by offering two alternatives for what she might have meant. As noted in comments, “B.O.” does not seem to be a very likely alternative in context, which suggests that Lady Patricia’...


5

I think that Wolosky is basically right about the third quatrain, but could have put her claim a bit more clearly. You are right that the “miraculous thing” is that both fire hardens ice and ice kindles fire, so that Wolosky is a bit misleading when she appears to assign the “miraculous thing” to fire. But she doesn’t say that only fire is the “miraculous ...


5

firstly, what is the intended meaning here From the translation: (...) many things, may hawk, hunt, fish, ride, play or traffic. in the original: (...) molte cose, uccellare, cacciare, pescare, cavalcare, giucare o mercatare: Looking at a dictionary: mercatàre - verbo intransitivo (arcaico) fare il mercante, esercitare un'attività mercantile the ...


4

Here is the original text in Italian (bold mine): [...] il che degli innamorati uomini non avviene, sì come noi possiamo apertamente vedere. Essi, se alcuna malinconia o gravezza di pensieri gli affligge, hanno molti modi da alleggiare o da passar quello, per ciò che a loro, volendo essi, non manca l’andare a torno, udire e veder molte cose, uccellare, ...


4

Scaffolding and Mohawks mean just what they mean separately; it's a piece of what used to be common knowledge that you're missing. In the twentieth Century, Mohawk Indians were commonly employed as construction workers on high-rise buildings in New York City ... they were supposedly surefooted and not afraid of heights. See the 1970s documentary High Steel ...


4

This can be interpreted as a sincere piece of advise for his son. "Remember always that you are but one among others, and you can hardly mistake your place in society." Hazlitt advises his son to always keep in mind that he is no one special. He is among the people in society and should neither be conceited nor belittle himself, should neither be ...


3

I don't think there is anything mysterious about this. If you think about it, every story relies on something which happens before the telling of the story begins, and every situation related in a story continues to have consequences after the latest point related in the story. To take the archetypal example of Genesis 1:1 In the beginning God created the ...


3

The first question: It doesn’t. It’s a weak reading of the poem. The author claims the adjectives shift and imply fire as positive and ice as negative. I don’t see there being any additional meaning behind that beyond ice generally being a harsh, rough, unaccommodating substance. “Wondrous” doesn’t refer to fire itself, but to the repeated idea of amorous ...


3

TL;DR: “Sweet madness” is an allusion to Milton’s Comus, which itself alludes to Homer’s Odyssey. Comus Aurobindo admired the works of John Milton, as we can see from his poetry criticism: As [the magnificent Elizabethan outburst] dies away, we have the lonely figure of Milton with his strenuous effort at an intellectual poetry cast in the type of the ...


3

According to A Shakespeare Glossary, the adjective "kind" had several meanings: natural, appropriate, proper (…) favourable, gracious (…) affectionate, loving, fond (…) Based on this, the relationship between Hamlet and Claudius is described as a little more than just kinship (Claudius is not just his uncle but now also his stepfather) but less ...


2

Meiosis It's a figure of speech, a form of understatement. Hamlet is describing a total lack as if it were a mere diminishment. This also lets him frame it as an antithesis.


2

Inversion is far from unusual in Shakespeare's verse. Many other examples can be found in other plays. See for example Act 1, scene 1 in The First Part of King Henry VI: Four of their lords I'll change for one of ours. (...) Bonfires in France forthwith I am to make, (...) Ten thousand soldiers with me I will take From Richard II: Free speech and fearless ...


2

At my (public) school (in England 'public' schools are actually private i.e. one has to pay fees for the privilege of attending), it is common for rugby football as a sport to be described as either 'rugny', 'ruggers' or simply 'football' as the correct term for 'football' is actually soccer. Bear in mind that rugby (football) is a hooligan's game played by ...


1

“In twos and threes” refers to the rhythm of the poem. The poem has no fixed pattern of stresses, but when I read it, each line has either two or three stresses. Most lines have two: What kind of people Are these? Some stammer Of land, some Want nothing but light— But a few have three: A woman’s soul, felt … Up to my knees in snow. … At high tide, eerily ...


1

The "only more" is simply referring to that tumors are generally not composed of any novel material, but rather the surrounding bodily tissues, growing without being kept in check. When you develop a bone tumor, the tumorous growth is made of the same cells as the rest of the bone, just growing out of control. As we generally don't expect our ...


1

I note, first off, that the "bathe" in question is going for a swim. (This is why "swim suits" are also called "bathing suits.") But the only noun usage offered by the Cambridge dictionary is an occasion when you swim or spend time in water: That is, the noun "bathe" appears to mean only the swim meaning that "...


1

In the preface of the Decameron, Boccaccio indicates the ideal reader to whom the work is addressed. The audience is women who are forced to live segregated at home without the possibility of distraction from painful thoughts. On the contrary, men manage to get distracted in many practical ways. One of these is bargaining, not only at the market but in every ...


1

Yes, your understanding is correct. his trained hands seemed of their own will to be doing what they could to stanch the fearful bleeding By making his hands the subject of the sentence, here, the text is implying that his hands are acting automatically, independently of his conscious brain. This implication is confirmed by the next phrase "of their ...


1

I think "solving that question" means successfully finding somewhere to live besides days. So "solving" just means finding the answer or answers to. In math, solving x squared equals nine means figuring out that x equals three or minus three. What might the answers be? Maybe living at night, or at random times, perhaps ignoring time ...


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