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7

Normally, if a door is open a crack, at the bottom of it you will see something dark. It might be the grass, or dirt, or whatever else is outside the door. Above that you will see whiteness. That whiteness isn't a thing - it's the absence of things, emptiness, daylight. That's "negative" space -- the lack of stuff to see. But in this case, surprisingly, the ...


6

‘The Tyger’ contains a series of rhetorical questions, which we understand to be about the nature of the creator of the Tyger. The first questions are given in conventional English syntax: What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? But ...


6

Bilbo isn't talking to himself at this point, as the context makes clear: Elrond went forward and stood beside the silent figure. ‘Awake, little master!’ he said, with a smile. Then, turning to Frodo, he beckoned to him. ‘Now at last the hour has come that you have wished for, Frodo,’ he said. ‘Here is a friend that you have long missed.’ The dark ...


6

Wordsworth thought that the phrase was a leap of pure imagination: Here is the full strength of the imagination involved in the word, hangs, and exerted upon the whole image: First, the Fleet, an aggregate of many Ships, is represented as one mighty Person, whose track, we know and feel, is upon the waters; but, taking advantage of its appearance to the ...


5

A Google search for the term reveals that it means the same thing as "buck teeth", large front teeth. In French, buck teeth are called dents à l'anglaise, literally "English teeth." Also here: dents à l'anglaise Dents longues et proéminentes It's apparently not in current usage.


4

"Dripping with gore" indicates that the man had just committed a violent murder and was literally dripping with blood from the victim. However if he were philosophically inclined, he could hold forth on views that Buddhism was better than Christianity -- or, in view of the way Father Brown is discussing European criminals, those notions of Buddhism that ...


4

Extremely wealthy (or powerful) people can get away with offending against conventions that other people are bound by, because other people don't want to offend them. Also, an ordinary person wanted to do business with the collector would have had to show that he was taking the matter seriously by dressing properly, but either a duke or a millionaire could ...


3

The old man in question had committed a murder. On the other hand, the victim had blackmailed him for years and had just demanded that their children marry. Holmes thinks that this is so great a provocation that he is, in fact, letting the murderer off on the condition that he make a statement that he did it, so that Holmes can produce the statement if it ...


3

"Ethical fellowship" is a sort of a keyphrase for secular beliefs that there are right and wrong actions distinct from any religious framework, as per Felix Adler's Ethical Movement. So Father Brown is basically alluding to two secular (often associated with atheism) movements, evolution and ethical fellowship, to take a dig at people believing that anything ...


3

One should consider the context of this passage. The porter is obviously very drunk, and when McDuff and Lennox come in, the following exchange occurs (quoted from the First Folio, emphasis added; line breaks from the First Folio): Macd. Was it so late, friend, ere you went to Bed, That you doe lye so late? Port. Faith Sir, we were carowsing till the ...


3

Yes, he cannot see his own wrong and instead blames the goddess of love. For context here, it's useful to know a little about the classical reference that Frank Ashurst is making. It's first put into the reader's mind all the way back at the beginning, in the epigraph of this story: "The Apple-tree, the singing and the gold." ~ Murray's "Hippolytus of ...


2

Sabine women were a byword for married virtue and chastity. Here are two examples from classical Latin writers with whom Fitzstephen was likely familiar: But if a chaste wife, assisting on her part [in the management] of the house, and beloved children (such as is the Sabine, or the sun-burned spouse of the industrious Apulian), piles up the sacred hearth ...


2

"It" refers back to "go[ing] straight to the point". If the man's thoughts are dominated by paranoia (the monomania in this story), then he will sense that any indirect questions asked by Father Brown are attempts to find something out about him without being open about it. General questions and comments that are often used to break the ice, e.g. comments ...


2

The famous Littré dictionary (four volumes, 1880s) provides the following definition of souteneur: 2 Particulièrement, celui qui se fait le champion d'une maison de jeu ou de quelque mauvais lieu. Un souteneur de filles. Free translation: Particularly, someone who acts as the champion/defender of a gambling house or some house of ill repute. A ...


2

According to the Wiktionnaire: Le souteneur Celui qui, vivant du gain d’une prostituée, prétend assurer, en retour, sa protection. Le proxénète Personne qui tire profit de la prostitution d’autrui ou bien la favorise." Le souteneur: gives protection for money. Le proxénète: just looks for profit. La Celestina is a good example of this.


2

What the man appears to be saying is that Mr. Aylmer and Mr. Strake may have been reborn or reincarnated, after having been other types of creatures in earlier lives (birds or other animals or both) and that they may have tried to kill each other in these previous lives. In other words, their struggle returns each time they are reborn. This appears to be how ...


2

As Gandalf explained to Frodo, they are in the "Hall of Fire", where "a bright fire was burning in a great hearth". Fire can be both a source of heat and a source of light. In this hall, the fire in the hearth is the main source of light; the fire is even described as "bright", emphasizing that it is a source of light. The phrase "little other light" means ...


2

In the phrase "thinking his thoughts", "think" means neither "think about" nor "think by". It means having the same thoughts, holding the same thoughts in your mind. This is part of being "inside" the murder: Father Brown tries to experience the murderer's thoughts in order to better understand him. The "posture of his hunched and peering hatred" would be a ...


2

When we say that something throbs, we mean that it appears to vibrate, possibly making a steady noise. This can refer to vibrations caused by objects, but also to music. For example: "Already the engine was throbbing" ("Morning Star" by Matt Mooney) "The Haunted Woods was full of the groans of mighty trees wrung in the tempest, and the air throbbed with the ...


2

To all appearances, the man was drugged with something the woman gave him to drink. The drink is not necessarily the only meaning of "summer wine", just like angel's kiss is ambiguous: a kiss by a woman who looks "angelic", a classic cocktail named "angel's kiss", or a less obvious meaning. However, "let's pass some time" suggests that there was an ...


1

Anne is saying that she is been trying to talk less and that if Marilla had been aware of her efforts, she would have expressed appreciation or possibly given her praise for it (=given her credit for it). For another example of "giving someone credit" in a different context, see Give me credit on BBC Learning English (18 August 2015).


1

Parolles was blindfolded while he was being questioned by noblemen and soldiers who belonged to the same camp as himself. Just before the words "so, look about you: know you any here?", one of these lords removes the blindfold. The words mean: "Look around you. Do you know any of the people here?" Parolles then recognises the people around him, including ...


1

The “unfamiliar line” is the one that appears (in slight variations) at the end of each verse of the song: And I will give to you my summer wine This is an unfamiliar (meaning “original”) pick-up or come-on line. “Wine” is a metaphor for something delightful and intoxicating (here, sex), and “summer” is metaphorically hot, languid, ripe.


1

Martin Luther King (MLK) was a seminary graduate and used biblical imagery and allusions prolifically in his civil rights speeches—as you probably already know. In any case, as you are also probably aware, the phrase from Isaiah 40:5 and is used in the context of his famous “I Have a Dream” speech: “And the glory of the LORD shall be revealed, and all flesh ...


1

First of all, the man is saying that he is a "secularist." Specifically, he is an "evolutionist" (as opposed to a "creationist" who would believe in the "divinity" of the Holy Spirit, rather than just its "existence" in a "spiritual sense." That said, if the man doesn't believe in "divinity," from what does his views on right and wrong derive. The answer ...


1

In Early Modern English, "prime" could mean "early years, prime of life, fullness of youth", but also "perfection, fullness" and "spring, springtime" (see Shakespeare's Words). "Tarry" could mean "stay for, wait for" (among other meanings; see Shakespeare's Words). Based on this, interpreting the last stanza as "Get married while you are in the prime of ...


1

"Prime" does not refer to virginity. After an admittedly brief search, I could not find any examples of such usage. Clearly, what Herrick is referring to is the prime of life, specifically and biologically, the most fecund period of life, when organisms are most sexually active. His poem is an example of a genre which might be called Carpe Diem seduction ...


1

You are right that there is double meaning in the line For having lost but once your prime, The double meaning works because “once” means not only “at some point or period in the past” but also “at one time only” (OED). In a discussion of virginity, a reference to losing something “but once” has a clear implication, and “prime” has the meaning “the ...


1

Since this is a translation, it's worth looking at the original sentence first, which can be found on British History Online: Vrbis matronæ ipsæ Sabinæ sunt. There may be more than one way to translate this ("The matrons / wives of the city are themselves / real Sabines") but the comparison shows at least that "Sabines" comes from the Latin text and not ...


1

"Abortive" means "failing to produce results," so it denotes a sorrow, probably short-lived, that doesn't cause the person to change. Likewise a "shortwinded" person quickly loses his breath on exercise, and therefore an elation is "shortwinded" if it ends quickly because it's exhausted. Since Gatsby is dead by the end of the novel -- and the reference is ...


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