16

Nothing proves it. The closest are Dunya's accusations, including her knowledge that he both discussed poison with her, AND went to get that poison. "...Не твой револьвер, а Марфы Петровны, которую ты убил, злодей! У тебя ничего не было своего в ее доме. Я взяла его, как стала подозревать, на что ты способен." "Ты жену отравил, я знаю, ты сам убийца!…...


12

The word "propaganda" at that time was not understood the way we tend to understand it today. It is more or less safe to understand it based on its etymology, i.e. based on the verb "propagate" - propaganda: "A concerted set of messages aimed at influencing the opinions or behaviour of large numbers of people." - just remove the ...


9

When Rodion says he could be wrong, he means his words for the previous sentence: Hurrah for Sonia! What a mine they've dug there! And they're making the most of it! Yes, they are making the most of it! They've wept over it and grown used to it. Man grows used to everything, the scoundrel! So he says that man must be a scoundrel to accept the fact ...


7

It was published during 1866 in the issues 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12. Dostoyevsky was still writing the novel in 1866 during the publication and finished it only in November or December. January issue with part one (number III): February issue with part two (it says "Part 1, chapters VIII-XIII") (number II): April issue with part three (it says "Part 2, ...


4

First the definition would be good. Sadly, there are quite a few but I think that only one is important: Relating to the philosophy or theories of aesthetics. Of or concerning the appreciation of beauty or good taste: aesthetic judgment; the aesthetic appeal of the exhibit. Attractive or appealing: the more aesthetic features of the building. Characterized ...


3

I admit that I haven't read the novel, but a look at the Russian text suggests that by "benevolent Providence" Raskolnikov means God. The relevant quote is Russian is as follows: во-вторых, что целый месяц всеблагое провидение беспокоил, призывая в свидетели, что не для своей, дескать, плоти и похоти предпринимаю, а имею в виду великолепную и приятную ...


3

This question Razumihin will answer himself (Part III, chapter I, same translation) “What do you think?” shouted Razumihin, louder than ever, “you think I am attacking them for talking nonsense? Not a bit! I like them to talk nonsense. That’s man’s one privilege over all creation. Through error you come to the truth! I am a man because I err! You ...


2

I don't know where the lined Wiki page got the Rhodes idea. The name Rodion really comes from the Greek Ῥοδίων. In the context of Crime and Punishment it bears several meanings, and likely refers to all of its literal meaning (heroic, as Raskolnikov tries himself as a hero), King Herod (who is a despicable villain in Russian tradition), Herodion of Patras (...


2

There is no mention of a "thin, dark, passageway", at least in the original. This description refers to the backstairs, before the landing and apartment itself. Immediately behind the apartment threshold, there is a [dark] entry. The kitchen is separated from the entry by a partition; that is, there is no 'substantial' stand-alone kitchen per se; it's just ...


2

I've searched for some material in Russian on the topic and haven't found much. The only book by a serious critic, I found, is by Vadim Kozhinov. He writes that in early editions of the novel Lizaveta was pregnant, but later Dostoevsky removed this information. Kozhinov supposes that may be Lizaveta's murder could have been initial Dostoevsky's idea, that he ...


2

English translation is very close to the original text: Ну а коли я соврал, — воскликнул он вдруг невольно, — коли действительно не подлец человек, весь вообще, весь род то есть человеческий, то значит, что остальное всё — предрассудки, одни только страхи напущенные, и нет никаких преград, и так тому и следует быть!.. My interpretation is that scoundrels ...


1

Roskolnikov is obsessed with the idea of powerful people who can 'break' the laws because they are 'special'. His primary example is Napolean. These people are in his mind 'better' and the laws (such as 'you shall not murder') simply do not apply to them. This should become clearer as the book progresses. The murder he commits is his way of trying to prove ...


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