39

We don't know, but there's a lot of evidence supporting it. The Language of flowers, or floriography, goes back much further than Victorian times. It was used or alluded to in Shakespeare's plays (see also this question) and even the Hebrew Bible. It's unknown whether J.K. Rowling knew about it - she's never commented publicly on the wormwood/asphodel ...


25

This scene is meant to reveal more about Atticus to Scout. When he kills the mad dog--and does so expertly, with one shot--it shows Scout that there is more to him than a lawyer and a father. He knows how to shoot and he's good at it. “Take him, Mr. Finch.” Mr. Tate handed the rifle to Atticus; Jem and I nearly fainted. This illustrates my point well;...


23

Probably symbolic. I found this interview with Yann Martel, from which two of his answers in particular jumped out at me: I chose the name Pi because it's an irrational number (one with no discernable pattern). Yet scientists use this irrational number to come to a "rational" understanding of the universe. To me, religion is a bit like that, "irrational" ...


22

WARNING: Spoilers ahead. (Emphasis mine on all quotes below) Why was Hedwig killed anyway? Other than the twitter link provided in the question, Rowling gave a fuller explanation in an interview (full transcript of the interview can be found here): Twinkletoes*: "Why did you feel that Hedwig's death was necessary?" J.K. Rowling: "The loss of Hedwig ...


21

Oranges and Lemons is not just a nursery rhyme, it is also a children's dance or game. Two children place their hands together to form an arch - an arch of sanctuary. The other children pass under the arch in pairs as the song is sung. At the end Here comes a chopper to chop off your head, a pair of children is caught. That caught pair makes another arch. ...


19

Note: This does not in ANY WAY represent my own religious views. It's possible that C.S. Lewis meant for the Dwarfs to represent the Jews. At the end of The Last Battle, the Dwarfs refused to be 'taken in' by Aslan. It's possible that C.S. Lewis meant for this to represent the Jews refusing to believe in Jesus. The Jews didn't believe in Jesus. They don't ...


19

First of all, let me just point out two things which it may be useful to bear in mind when considering how seriously to take this answer: whether I'm overanalysing or underanalysing here. Firstly, some of the choices of animals are significant. It's not completely random; the author spent some considerable time thinking about which animals to use to ...


17

This is really more of an extended comment, than an answer. But my feeling about that rhyme is that part of the reason why Orwell used it in the story, was as another example of Winston being "betrayed" by something he trusted. Basically one of the themes of the book is inescapable doom, and even the things that seemed good and seemed "on his side", O'Brien ...


17

The "neon god" is obviously the sign pictured earlier in the song. But why is it a god? The sign is a god because people made it a god ("the neon god they made"). In praying and bowing to the sign, they made it into a god. What the sign represents, though, is harder to answer. Many interpretations I've found have said it represented advertising and TV. ...


17

As stated in this same question on Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange, J. K. Rowling has never said anything stating whether or not this was intentional. We only have speculation to go on, so I will speculate :) My guess is yes. Why? Too much of a coincidence How likely is it that this was by accident? You've got him saying something that, when ...


16

The song represents the successful eradication of shared English culture by The Party. It's a nursery rhyme the majority of British people would be familiar with, but in 1984 characters can only remember fragments of it. Winston tries to gather more information about the song as he does other aspects of pre-party culture, but fails. Why, then, that ...


16

On a Pottermore article ("Lily, Petunia, and the Language of Flowers") this is written: If his first words to Harry are anything to go by, the language of flowers suggests that Snape deeply regrets Lily Potter’s death. Also on monkshood and wolfsbane, the next tings he asks about: Snape also asks Harry what the difference is between monkshood and ...


15

The bananafish represents Seymour, and all the other returning soldiers. "Well, they swim into a hole where there's a lot of bananas. They're very ordinary-looking fish when they swim in. But once they get in, they behave like pigs. Why, I've known some bananafish to swim into a banana hole and eat as many as seventy-eight bananas." He edged the float and ...


15

Mr. Jones symbolizes Tsar Nicholas II, the last Tsar of Russia. He oppresses the animals, but is overthrown. Mr. Pilkington symbolizes England and the USA. They are frightened of the revolution. He has a larger, but more unkempt farm compared to Frederick. Mr. Frederick is possibly Germany, as he's described as abusing his animals and is on bad terms with ...


15

Albus As you state, Albus translates to "white", which was a nod to alchemy: Colours also played their part in the naming of Hagrid and Dumbledore, whose first names are Rubeus (red) and Albus (white) respectively. The choice was a nod to alchemy, which is so important in the first Harry Potter book, where 'the red' and 'the white' are essential mystical ...


14

The conch symbolizes leadership and civilization throughout the story. In the beginning, Ralph uses it as an extension of his power. For example from the first chapter after he is elected. Ralph smiled and held up the conch for silence. Ralph uses it throughout the story to hold meetings and even makes the rule that people could only talk if they have ...


14

From an interview here: Q: How much of Jesus Christ is there in Rand? We have the wounded palms, side wound, crown of swords... How representational of Jesus Christ is Rand? ROBERT JORDAN: Rand has some elements of Jesus Christ, yes. But he is intended more to be a general "messiah figure." An archetype such as Arthur, rather than a manifestation of ...


13

It foreshadows the death of Ewell in a way: When the dog, who has been around for a long time, becomes a real threat to the children, the shooting skills of Atticus, which haven't been seen for many years, reveals itself to deal with the threat. When Bob Ewell, who also has been around for a long time, becomes a real threat to the children, Boo Radley, who ...


13

Yes. In the words of Jesse McDevitt-Irwin: suggests that she could represent the educated of Russia, more specifically, the educated who did not believe that communism was the correct path. She also skips out on work, which could mean the educated because they did not do physical nature. One more clue is the nature of a cat on a farm: the cat performs a ...


12

This interpretation is largely based on discussions I had with one of my professors and classmates about The Kraken and Tennyson’s use of symbolism in general. We believe that The Kraken, like other poems of Tennyson's, should be looked at with an idea of the political and social climes of the Victorian age. Tennyson’s work is often permeated with social ...


12

The first and second parts of Howl are, in a way, a question and an answer. One cannot read the terrible things that happened to real people and not think, "Why were these brilliant thinkers driven to madness? What could make a man jump off a bridge, unloved and alone, before despairing of even the certainty of death? What could make someone drink themselves ...


11

The cat does have significance, but it's hard to say who exactly she represents. She skulks around and doesn't do any work, votes for both sides, and makes people satisfied enough that she never actually has to do anything. the behaviour of the cat was somewhat peculiar. It was soon noticed that when there was work to be done the cat could never be ...


11

I don't believe the Raven symbolizes death at all, but rather life, in grief of having to live after a loved one is dead. As Poe himself put it in his essay Philosophy of Composition: The reader begins now to regard the Raven as emblematical — but it is not until the very last line of the very last stanza, that the intention of making him emblematical ...


11

I found several different possibilities. Here are the four I found most helpful. It is nonsense and should not be taken so seriously The rhyme has traditionally been seen as a nonsense verse, particularly as the couple go up a hill to find water, which is often thought to be found at the bottom of hills. Vinegar and brown paper were a home cure used as a ...


11

“Just going, brother! Just looking for some place to stop . . . somewhere. We're from Imperial Valley, California. The 'People's Party' crowd grabbed the crops and any food we had in the cellars. Hoarding, they called it. So we just picked up and went. Got to travel by night, on account of the Washington crowd. . . . We're just looking for some place to live....


11

First we need to understand what the "Deep Magic" is/represents, before moving to the "Deeper Magic." We know from chapter 13 of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe that the Deep Magic is written in several places (on the Stone Table, on the Scepter of the Emperor-beyond-the-Sea, etc.). We also know from that chapter that it defines what Justice requires....


11

If this is a coincidence, it's one hell of a coincidence. This is one of those situations in which Chekhov's gun is your friend. If it weren't significant, why would the author have mentioned a specific number of days? While some books do get into gritty details like that with no particular stated reason - many fantasy books, for example - Life of Pi isn't ...


11

Warning: major spoilers follow. Coin ~ money There are a few ways in which the District 13 leader could be symbolised by the idea of money. Power. Money can be used to buy power, or as a representation of power, and one of the most important things about this character is that she seeks power. Lack of personality. Money has no use value; it's faceless (...


11

Sergeant Shadwell is looking for one of the traditional signs of witchcraft. That is, the answer to the question, “Is there actually a traditional connection between witchcraft and nipples” is yes. Specifically, it was believed that a witch would often have a familiar: a demon in the shape of an animal, or an animal bound to their will through magic, or ...


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