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1

It's weird to me how Frodo and Sam didn't at least come up with some cover story. Some excuse to go there with the Ring. Anything to make Gollum not guess the truth. Gollum was basically: we need to get into Mordor, it's not your business why. If you want to come with us, these are our conditions. In fact, Gollum pleads to allow him to guide them, and is a ...


0

The Fellowship doesn't talk about the Ring much on the way. Certainly not about why they want to get to Mordor. This leaves Gollum with no way of figuring out what Frodo intends but what he can reason out based on his own thinking -- insofar as he thought about it rather than the all-important question of how to get the Ring back. And his own thinking ...


4

Hello and welcome to this site! As you note, that name is a bit too revealing, and Tolkien is much too subtle to have used it if he didn’t have a particular reason, in my opinion: An important thing to consider is that the books The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings were both intended (by Tolkien, in at least several occasions) to be seen as transcriptions ...


2

I would say that yes, Théoden was saying he ‘misses’ Gríma in both senses that others have pointed out: he wishes he had someone to advise him and he misses Gríma personally. I base this on two passages in Chapter VII, ‘Helm’s Deep’, that I see no-one else quoting. The first is just after Gandalf has ridden away: ‘What does that mean?’ said one of the guard ...


35

No, except yes TL;DR: ‘Wormtongue’ is a deliberately negative name given by his enemies, so it can’t be faulted for being pejorative, even if it’s not as unflattering as it might seem to modern ears. But ‘Gríma’ itself isn’t much better! As Mary points out, ‘Wormtongue’ is a nickname applied to Gríma by his opponents (which, Gandalf implies, is everyone but ...


19

Grima calls Gandalf "Lathspell" -- Ill News -- because he hated him and wanted Theoden to mistrust him. Likewise, "Wormtongue" is what people who already hate him call him. It is true that Gandalf says to Theoden "him that all but you call Wormtongue," but that was probably a slow development. People call him that to urge ...


1

For grammatical reasons it does not, in English, mean "The ring that is lord of the other rings" "The Lord of the Rings" refers to a being who is lord over all the rings including the "One ring that rules them all". "Lord of the Rings" would be ambiguous only as a title because some abbreviation is allowed in a title (...


5

The TV Tropes editor was probably thinking of the following passage from Tolkien’s notes to his essay ‘On Fairy-Stories’: There is no suggestion of dream in The Wind in the Willows. ‘The Mole had been working very hard all the morning, spring-cleaning his little house.’ So it begins, and that correct tone is maintained. It is all the more remarkable that A. ...


96

The phrase “the Lord of the Rings” is ambiguous in the same way in English: it might, in theory, refer either to the One Ring, which rules the other rings, or to Sauron, who can use it to rule all the rings. However, the text does not make use of this ambiguity. The phrase “the Lord of the Ring(s)” appears four times in the text, and three times it’s clear ...


8

In the original version of The Hobbit, no. In any version of the Hobbit, the Ring is not shown to have much effect on Bilbo. He uses it as a useful tool, a way of turning invisible which gets him out of various scrapes and helps him through the story. A simple invisibility ring is an ancient trope in literature, and in The Hobbit the Ring doesn't function as ...


6

Once Tolkien revised it, it was (slightly) foreshadowed by the way Bilbo lied about the ring. In the first edition, once Gollum lost the contest, he tried to give Bilbo the ring and was ashamed that he could not I don’t know how many times Gollum begged Bilbo’s pardon. He kept on saying: “We are ssorry; we didn’t mean to cheat, we meant to give it our only ...


3

Allow me to look at your problem from a slightly different angle. It's what I like about books (as opposed to movies): a good book encourages you to continually 'visualize' what happens yourself and immerse yourself in the world of the book. This includes details which the author deemed not worthy of mentioning over and over again, such as Frodo's ...


3

The Nature of Hobbits I'd start with 'Concerning Hobbits': Hobbits are an unobtrusive but very ancient people, more numerous formerly than they are today; for they love peace and quiet and good tilled earth: a well-ordered and well-farmed countryside was their favourite haunt. They do not and did not understand or like machines more complicated than a forge-...


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