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It's certainly an odd poem. It looks to me like he's trying to suggest that by crucifying Jesus, man gains independence and strength (perhaps by hardening their consciences or coming to a new realization about his nature). It also seems linked to that religion (someone comment please!) that believes men are destined to become gods.


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I put "Yeats ceremony of innocence" on Google and saw lots of speculation/interpretation just in the first page of results. Yeats uses the term "ceremony of innocence" to harken back to the ordered, structured, ceremonial world of pre-war Europe. Yeats mourns what he sees as the loss of an aristocratic order. Instead of order, the world is now awash in ...


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While what a poet is trying to tell the reader will usually be a matter of dispute, B. C. Southam shines some light on these lines in A Student's Guide to the Selected Poems of T.S. Eliot, pp. 217-8: ll. 95-8: a parody, combining a line from the children's song 'Here we go round the mulberry bush' - 'This is the way we clap our hands' - with a ...


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Even free verse can include an occasional rhyme. The key is its metrical irregularity and avoidance of being defined as a fixed form. So what makes this poem interesting is that is appears to have regularity, because of the repeated 4-line verse paragraphs, which look like a regular stanzaic form. But the unpredictable meter contradicts this appearance, ...


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