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3

Although it doesn't specifically contain the line you paraphrased, her poem titled "Life While-You-Wait", from 1976, describes the sentiment expressed in it, i.e. that life isn't scripted and can't be planned, and you have to take it as it comes and improvise. Perhaps this is the poem you're referring to? Here are a few excerpts, in a translation ...


0

As far as I can see, the end of the poem sees the lovers reunited, with total perfection (reference to the lotus): Like a lotus bending on its stem, she slowly bent her head on my breast So, the prayers stopping is most likely about the end of the need for prayer, as all is now fulfilled.


3

The page you link to calls this a "devotional song", suggesting that it's religious and that the entity "touching" the narrator is God. This makes sense as an interpretation of the poem: As I walk along my way I receive your touch Now and then But I don’t know how and when. The narrator feels close to God at specific moments, but ...


7

The Poem is 'Rags' by Edmund Vance Cooke, and the verse you partially recall is And if there's no heaven for love like that, For such four-legged fealty—well! If I have any choice, I tell you flat, I'll take my chance in hell. It's actually a pretty gruesome tale, Rags saves the narrators life twice on the Front and is brought back to the UK with the ...


1

One possibility is the line "Little we see in Nature that is ours" from Wordsworth's sonnet "The world is too much with us". The poem reads as follows: The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;— Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! This Sea ...


0

I myself don't read too much into the stability. In this entire work, after all, the Prophet describes in detail how always both sides of a quality, i.e. the quality's presence and absence, are equally valuable. In my pondering, I found two lines of thought which are actually quite distinct (though not mutually exclusive): I think the same way that other ...


2

The portrayal of Love in quoted lines (in OP) by Kahlil Gibran is showing the hard and awry paths of love but after few lines more the poem reads: And then he assigns you to his sacred fire, that you may become sacred bread for God's sacred feast. All these things shall love do unto you that you may know the secrets of your heart, and in that knowledge ...


5

It may be because, while he wrote The Prophet in English, his first language was Arabic which has two grammatical genders. The word for love/passion is عشق which is masculine and would be referred to as "he" when used as a pronoun.


0

In the context, the "arrow" is the children, the "bow" is the parents. The parents launch their children into the world without themselves being launched. He loves the bow for being stable exactly because it enables the arrows to move and to do so precisely. By thus making it metaphorical, the poet does not have to specify which target ...


6

This was already identified by Quassnoi here! The poem is ‘The Water Zoo’ by “Evoe” (a pseudonym for E. V. Knox), published in Punch, 9th April 1924. The fragments your father remembered were well-recalled! Here’s how they correspond to the original lines: “Today I saw 10,000 fish observing me with solemn eyes. In the aquarium.” To-day I have seen all I ...


5

Let's look at the poem verse by verse. For a Hughes poem, it is surprisingly literal. The Laburnum top is silent, quite still In the afternoon yellow September sunlight, A few leaves yellowing, all its seeds fallen. The poet describes a Laburnum tree. It is still on an autumn afternoon, the leaves getting ready to fall. Till the goldfinch comes, with a ...


1

The last line "'Tis folly to be wise" is a contradiction. "No more" is used as "This should stop". The sentence becomes clear if it is extended like this: No more; where ignorance is bliss, 'Tis folly to be wise. But rather: where ignorance is cowardice, it's brave to be wise.


3

According to Christopher Ricks (Eliot, T. S. Inventions of the March Hare), in his drafts of the poem T. S. Eliot subtitled it Prufrock among the Women. And an article in the Kipling Journal of 1959, The Unfading Genius of Rudyard Kipling, reports Eliot saying 'The Love Song of' came from Rudyard Kipling's poem The Love Song of Har Dyal. Eliot admitted, some ...


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