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9

Historically, the prefix "a-" derives from a preposition that was used before the gerund form of a verb. Johan Elsness cites an example of this in his paper On the progression of the progressive in early Modern English from Old English: ... ZyrstandæZ ic wæs on huntunZe ... . (From Ælfric, Colloquy 68) In the above quote, "huntunZe" is ...


5

This is not a direct answer to the question in the sense of a general term, but there is a very well-known term for a specific example: the teichoskopia in Book III of the Iliad, where Helen stands atop the wall and catalogues the Greek chieftans. Depending on the context and your audience, you may be able to use "teichoskopia" as a general term, ...


10

Such introductions and descriptions are called epic catalogues. Barbarians are sometimes known to refer to them as epic catalogs. The term catalogue is not restricted to characters. Lists of armies, ships, places, etc. are also covered by the term. As far as I am aware, there is no specific term for any of these; they are all just called catalogues and ...


-1

Several of Thomas Hardy's neighbours at Higher Bockhampton were named Keats. One of them was my 4x great grandfather, James Keats. He was orphaned at the age of two, in 1779, along with his six year old brother, Thomas Keats. My essay, "John Keats's Father: A New Theory", published in The Keats-Shelley Review vol.26 number 2, September 2012, ...


2

“Opportunity” by Walter Malone As you might observe from some of my previous posts, I like to keep things in context; so, before addressing your question about the last two lines of this poem, I find it prudent to unpack the previous lines first for sake of continuity. They do me wrong who say I come no more When once I knock and fail to find you in; For ...


4

These lines are examples of metaphors - a figure of speech that equates two things for the purposes of comparison or symbolism, without the two being literally the same. The towel on the washing line is not literally a matador's cape, but the poem gives us the image that it is moving in the same way, thanks to the wind. The movement in the wind of each piece ...


0

I came across an article entitled Utility Futility, which discusses Britain's WW2 Utility scheme. The article expands upon the word Utility and its associated negative meanings which were present before the commissioning of the scheme. It could be that what Hughes had in mind were these negative, mockery meanings, which may had prevailed even after the ...


3

Theodor Fontane did not write "Das Trauerspiel von Afghanistan" in 1847/8, as the Berlin Review of Books erroneously claims, but a decade later. By that time, Fontane had been twice been in London as a foreign correspondent for Prussian newspapers: the first time from April till September 1852 (Bemmann: 99-106) and the second time from September ...


7

The book I am reading is "Alexander Pope: The Major Works," published by Oxford World's Classics, with introduction and notes by Pat Rogers. I looked everywhere in the book but the obvious section near the beginning titled "Note on the text". This section explains Notes at the end are signalled by a degree sign in the text. So the ...


3

In context in ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’, the poem ‘The Haunted Palace’ is a conceit (an extended metaphor) in which the palace represents Roderick Usher’s head, and its occupants his thoughts. In the story, the poem is introduced by the narrator in a manner that recommends this interpretation to the reader: The words of one of these rhapsodies I have ...


2

I don't think Crow is the subject of a judicial scene. The title "Examination at the Womb-Door" suggests that Crow is being tested before he can be born. The last line, "Pass, Crow," reveals that Crow has passed the test and is able to pass the gate into birth. The questions, then, aren't mocking or moral in nature. They are existential. ...


1

Neruda’s first two lines seems to set the tone for most of the rest of the poem No te amo como si fueras rosa de sal, topacio o flecha de claveles que propagan el fuego: The “rosa de sal” connotes a beautiful/useful thing that forms on surfaces, while the rest are all showy, outer, things (for “rosa de sal” see wikipedia under “fleur de sel”). These lines ...


0

As in English, the first month of the Spanish year is named after Janus, the Greek double-faced god, who looks behind at the past year and forward toward the new. Janus was also the god of thresholds, liminal spaces and doors, likely accounting for all the back and forth in the narrator’s words and the reference to the “key.” Some more information from ...


2

I tend to think that Neruda is talking about the possibility or potential of the man in the poem engendering a child with the unnamed woman and that, were this to occur, this potential child (or the life flowing through the child’s veins) would then, through her/his existence, “ground”him (a “sailor” who, instead, would like to have a woman waiting at every ...


15

This is a very simple type of poetic metre, iambic dimeter. Each line consists of just two feet, and each foot consists of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable: my name is Cow, and wen its nite, or wen the moon is shiyning brite, and all the men haf gon to bed - i stay up late. i lik the bred. Wikipedia's example of iambic dimeter is ...


-2

There are two comments/pieces of elucidations I would like to add: The "mulberry tree" reference can easily be seen as what The Ecclesiastes means when he says: "There is nothing new under the Sun." Namely, all human lives are circular and repetitive - "from the cradle to the grave" and everything in between. Therefore, the ...


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