New answers tagged

3

This 22-line poem is constructed in iambic tetrameter with rhyming couplets. Anyone who has studied Shakespeare will know the structure of his iambic pentameter and its biological association with a heartbeat. Poe’s use of iambic tetrameter is similar in nature and fitting structure for a poem that is, arguably, about life. With negatively charged diction ...


1

I have a copy of that article! Koppett wrote it for The Sporting News, and my download dates the article from 8/27/1998, although it could have been a reprint from 1979. In the article Koppett refers to a session of the Court of Historic Appeals in San Francisco on July 12 of 1979(?), aimed at determining the authorship and timing of the original poem. ...


-1

As a young man, Poe felt more than "isolated and different from everyone else." It was as if he felt "vision impaired" or "sensory impaired" and was unable to "pick up" things that were obvious to ordinary people. (This sometimes happens to very bright people whose intelllectual standards are so high that they miss out on what everyone else "knows." As one ...


0

Robert Frost is talking to himself in this poem. We can tell, because he says the owner will not mind "me" stopping here, not "us." So it's just he and the horse there, and he's not talking to the horse, because he talks about the horse. He therefore has no need to explain who he's thinking about. He knows who he's talking about. The poem is just a record ...


1

In Early Modern English, "prime" could mean "early years, prime of life, fullness of youth", but also "perfection, fullness" and "spring, springtime" (see Shakespeare's Words). "Tarry" could mean "stay for, wait for" (among other meanings; see Shakespeare's Words). Based on this, interpreting the last stanza as "Get married while you are in the prime of ...


0

Although I understand your read, I think it's incorrect. The seeming ambiguity is in the line "to the ancients spoke." If the remainder of the poem was what the tree said, I would expect a colon after "spoke," and the rest of the poem to be in quotes. Instead, I believe the narrator is human. She is contrasting the experience of the ancients, who demanded a ...


1

"Prime" does not refer to virginity. After an admittedly brief search, I could not find any examples of such usage. Clearly, what Herrick is referring to is the prime of life, specifically and biologically, the most fecund period of life, when organisms are most sexually active. His poem is an example of a genre which might be called Carpe Diem seduction ...


1

You are right that there is double meaning in the line For having lost but once your prime, The double meaning works because “once” means not only “at some point or period in the past” but also “at one time only” (OED). In a discussion of virginity, a reference to losing something “but once” has a clear implication, and “prime” has the meaning “the ...


2

It is impossible for us to say how come you have a different version—we’d have to know how you learned the poem, which you didn’t tell us, and you likely don’t remember. But we can investigate the general problem of corruption of texts. Fallibility of memory People are capable of prodigous feats of memorization: the actor playing the lead in Hamlet, for ...


2

The question supposes a particular theory about literature: namely, that the role of the text is to describe a fictional world, and the task of the reader is to determine facts about that world. According to this theory, it is unsatisfactory for Frost to tell us that he thinks he knows whose woods these are, but not to tell us who he thinks that is: by ...


4

It's a metaphor to emphasize the difference between the movable heads of flowers and their static leaves and stems. First, note how the poem is at pains to point out that the leaves stay still: The rambler vine climbed up the cottage post, the leaves in the night still where the day had placed them, "still where the day had placed them" here ...


2

Thomas’s biographer Byron Rogers speculated that the bitter contempt exhibited in some the poems was provoked by the loneliness and alienation of the poet. After studying at university in Bangor and being ordained as an Anglican priest, Thomas took up the living of the remote parish of Manafon in Powys. Whatever romantic notions the young man had about life ...


5

‘The Tyger’ contains a series of rhetorical questions, which we understand to be about the nature of the creator of the Tyger. The first questions are given in conventional English syntax: What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? But ...


0

Be honest of your feelings, don’t disguise or be distrustful even in loneliness nor horrible experience love is evergreen an will always be around.


3

Your example is only part of the sentence spoken by the narrator and lacks the context and the first verse: The context is when at sea, the narrator has seen a creature so horrible that the sight of it leaves those who see it disturbed for ever. In the first verse the narrator asks the rhetorical question “Do people help each other?” He does not answer ...


Top 50 recent answers are included