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1

From Verbose's answer: "In Blake's contemporary context, they're obviously the mills of the Industrial Revolution" Hardly. In 1804 there were no mill towns and very few mills in towns: the image conjured up in the popular imagination by the expression "Dark Satanic Mills", of tens of factories belching out smoke and turning the sky dark, ...


0

I haven’t read the volume but I believe the poem can be understood in and of itself. Nietzsche’s great quote that to appreciate an artwork is to feel we understand why the artist made those choices (or something akin to that) is my yardstick here for feeling confidence in my interpretation. The question of if the poem has a double meaning or symbolises ...


2

Habitats and soils of Belarus It's true that the land of Belarus is "spread widely with forests and marshes" and a lot of the soil is sandy. The book Belarus and Moldova: country studies (1995) by Helen Fedor (link goes to a 300-page PDF) includes a chapter "Physical Environment" in the Belarus part (by Jan Zaprudnik and Helen Fedor) ...


4

Plagiarism means unlawful theft of intellectual property in the context of writing. Modernism is heavily characterised by what is commonly referred to as allusiveness. When an author uses another author’s words for their artistic effect, this is often called “citation” (it means quotation rather than the academic sense of providing sources for ideas). T. S. ...


31

Examples of allusions in the poem In The Poems of T. S. Eliot Volume I edited by Christopher Ricks (Faber & Faber, 2015), Ricks has several notes for the lines "In the room the women come and go / Talking of Michelangelo." First, he points out that the lines "Dans la pièce les femmes vont et viennent / En parlant des maîtres de Sienne"...


7

The poem mentions several brands of typewriters, some of whose names are actually jumbled up by the typewriter: OLIMPYA: the German brand Olympia[-Werke]; ARUSTOCART: probably a reference to the Royal Aristocrat typewriter by the Royal Typewriter Company; RAMINTONG: Remington Typewriter Company [1]; LOLITEVVI and ALLIWETTIS: Olivetti; UNDERWORDS: Underwood ...


16

Facit was a brand of typewriters made by the company of the same name in Åtvidaberg, Sweden. The poem says so in the second stanza: Mine is a Swetish Maid Called FACIT Others are OLIMPYA or ARUSTOCART RAMINTONG or LOLITEVVI “Swetish Maid” = “Swedish-made”. The other references are to Olympia-Werke, the “Empire Aristocrat” brand of British Typewriters, ...


7

This newer parody version appears to have an anonymous author. I found the full poem here and here, so at least you can read it in full: "You are old, Father William," the young man said, "And your nose has a look of surprise; Your eyes have turned round to the back of your head, And you live upon cucumber pies." "I know it, I know ...


3

There are many discussions and analyses of "The Patriot" online. The tenor of these is that a patriot or a political leader who was acclaimed for great deeds talks about his downfall and how the common people misunderstand him; eventually, God will repay him. The patriot is seen as unequivocally positive and the common people as fickle and ...


5

These lines need to be interpreted in the context of the complete stanza: Thus I entered, and thus I go!       In triumphs, people have dropped down dead. "Paid by the world, what dost thou owe       Me?"—God might question; now instead, 'Tis God shall repay: I am safer so. There is an enjambment between the third and fourth lines of the stanza: ...


2

Many erroneously assume that Blake-light tragedy is a reference William Blake, who was indeed an enormous influence on Ginsberg and whom Ginsberg does make allusions to elsewhere in other works. However, it is actually a reference to an obscure incident which occurred in Denver, CO where Blake Street is found. Kerouac, Ginsberg, and Cassady spent time in ...


3

In the Russian literary tradition the chalk cross on the door is strongly associated with the story of St. Bartholomew's night massacre of Huguenots. Their doors were allegedly marked with chalk crosses. Cf Pasternak's Метель (the Blizzard): Все в крестиках двери, как в Варфоломееву Ночь all doors are in crosses, just like in St Bartholomew's night и по ...


5

A straightforward explanation is that Browning is referring to literal clay-eating (geophagy) among the natives of the New World (“men of the west”), for example, as reported by Alexander von Humboldt: The Otomacs [of Uruana in Brazil] swallow a prodigious quantity of earth. We found heaps of balls in their huts, piled up in pyramids three or four feet high....


2

‘To Autumn’ was first published in Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of St Agnes and Other Poems (London: Taylor and Hessey, 1820) where it starts on page 137 and you can see for yourself that the first stanza of the poem ends with a full stop. The book was published in July 1820, a couple of months before Keats departed for Italy, so it seems likely that he had the ...


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