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0

They didn't have to, with the possible exception of Frodo, who needed it to have any hope of healing the various wounds, physical and psychological that he received from the Ring and other sources (the Nazgul blade, Shelob's venom). Being allowed to go to Aman, as mortals, was a reward not an obligation. Bilbo was old and on the verge of death already when ...


4

Saruman's links to the Shire start long before his arrival there. In "The Two Towers," chapter "Floatsam and Jetsam", when Aragon, Gimli, and Legolas meet Merry and Pippin in Orthanc: Gimli took some and rubbed in in his palms and sniffed it. 'It feels good, and it smells good,' he said. 'It is good!" said Merry. 'My dear Gimli, it ...


7

Merry was responding to Frodo, so immediately before your quote, there is: 'Yes, this is Mordor,' said Frodo. 'Just one of its works. Saruman was doing its work all the time, even when he thought he was working for himself. And the same with those that Saruman tricked, like Lotho.' The chapter discusses Lotho, who made the money to buy up property by ...


4

There are two Swedish translation of Lord of the Rings. One by Åke Ohlmarks, of which Tolkien was very critical, and a much more recent translation by Erik Andersson which is much better regarded. A post on Global-lingo.com gives the following information: In the Swedish translation (by Åke Ohlmarks’ 1959-1961) he is called Bilbo Bagger (bagge = male sheep)....


9

I have just read The Lord of the Rings to my kids (yes, the whole thing! took a while...) We live in the UK, and they are 7 and 9 respectively. When I read that particular passage, they both sniggered (and the youngest hid his face under his blanket to muffle the noise. He very much identifies with Pippin...) Aragorn is joking. The mood of that particular ...


30

I agree with the content of the answers of Gareth Rees and hobbs, however, aside from the content of what he said, I think it's also important to address Aragorn's tone here. In particular: He's joking. Aragorn's 'harsh' tone to Pippin here is firmly tongue-in-cheek. His statement is a humorous way of expressing his appreciation for Pippin's service to him, ...


5

I entirely agree with the answers already given, but possibly there is another - probably minor - additional point here. During the time of the Fellowship, Pippin has a few times shown poor judgement, for example at the well in Moria ("Fool of a Took!") and when he picked up the Palantir and was seen by Sauron. Possibly by telling Pippin that he ...


23

While I agree almost entirely with Gareth Rees' answer, I think it can be made simpler with a bit of cultural context. Aragorn is a king. He's in a position to command, and while he's not the king of all Middle Earth, he has claimed the throne of Arnor as his birthright, which includes the part of Eriador that the Hobbits call the Shire. Pippin is a high ...


74

TL;DR: In this scene Aragorn confirms to Pippin that their relationship remains one of liege-lord and vassal within the feudal system of Gondor and Arnor. This confers high status and honour upon Pippin, as well as obligation: in fact, these are two sides of the same relationship. The north-kingdom When Aragorn says that his “realm lies also in the north” he ...


3

“Gondor” standing for “Minas Tirith” is a synecdoche, a figure of speech in which a part of something stands for the whole, or (as in this case) the whole of something stands for a part. The reason for choosing “Gondor” over “Minas Tirith” is that the former fits the rhythm and the latter does not. The speech consists of five lines of alliterative verse: ...


4

Théoden is the king of the Mark of Rohan. An old kingdom ally of Gondor. The warning beacons were part of an agreement of mutual aid between kingdoms. Rohan is not part of Gondor. Thus, the Rohirrim go to help the country of Gondor, not just the city of Minas Tirith (which yes, is an important part of helping Gondor, specially since the previous capital was ...


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