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1

For the record, here’s the context of the sentence from Butler that was quoted in Wikipedia. Butler does not give any further identification of the “French critics” who retorted to Hazlitt. I’ve restored the full quotation from Hazlitt, which was heavily redacted by Butler, whose elisions I have indicated by brackets. For no better reasons foreign criticism ...


-1

The three synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke) fit the conditions listed in the question. They are works of fiction (more about this below) based on another work of fiction, in that at least one of them used at least one of the other gospels as a source, even though there exist various conflicting theories exist about which one is older. However, Mark ...


5

This is what Vittore Branca explains in the Einaudi version of the Decameron (Italian original) about the antecedents of this novella: Neppure di questa novella si possono indicare antecedenti precisi e significativi. Sono state a volta a volta citate la leggenda di sant’Eustachio e un racconto delle Mille e una notte ed uno ebraico del Midrasch che ne ...


5

It had such consideration from the 19th century, with the advent of Romanticism, to the 20th century. Note that El Poema de Mío Cid wasn't even printed before 1779, as you can read in the book La filologia romanza by Pietro G. Beltrami (in Italian): Solo nel tardo Settecento e nell'Ottocento sono tornati nel circolo della cultura testi fondamentali della ...


5

TL;DR: The criminal butler was not a cliché of detective stories, but of silent films! Below I’ve listed ten silent films with criminal butlers, and another six where an apparently guilty butler is a significant suspect. I found these by searching the AFI catalog and IMDb for mysteries with “butler” in the synopsis. Silent films with criminal butlers Year ...


0

The earliest reference I am aware of is Shakespeare's Macbeth, written in or around 1606. Near the end of Act 3, scene 4, we find the following dialogue (emphasis mine), MACBETH: How say'st thou, that Macduff denies his person At our great bidding? LADY MACBETH: Did you send to him, sir? MACBETH: I hear it by the way; but I will send: There's not a one of ...


5

As others have already pointed out in the comments, Jane Austen's novel Northanger Abbey, published posthumously in 1818, a parody of Gothic fiction that was popular in the 1790s. It also contains a number of allusions to other works, as Wikipedia tells us: Several Gothic novels and authors are mentioned in the book, including Fanny Burney and The Monk. ...


3

The poem was found in a sixteenth-century register compiled by notary Brandan de Caxario, preserved in the Notarial Archives in Valletta. One of the functions of a legal notary is to maintain a register of legal deeds and contracts which can be consulted if the parties’ copies are lost or the parties disagree. On September 22, 1966, Dr (later Professor) ...


4

Tl;DR: The English press censorship regime in the Tudor and Stuart periods was not based on a list of banned works, and so the question has no definite answer. In this answer I’m following Cyndia Susan Clegg (2001), Press Censorship in Jacobean England (Cambridge University Press). The Elizabethan censorship regime was instituted by the Injunctions of 1559 ...


0

In The Scarlet Pimpernel (1905) Revolutionary France is described as a "tyranny" and agents of the committee of Public Safety are shown as having near dictatorial powers. Napoleonic France is shown as dictatorial and tyrannical in C. S. Forrester's "Hornblower" series, particularly in Flying Colors (1938). In neither case is the term &...


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