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7

The poem mentions several brands of typewriters, some of whose names are actually jumbled up by the typewriter: OLIMPYA: the German brand Olympia[-Werke]; ARUSTOCART: probably a reference to the Royal Aristocrat typewriter by the Royal Typewriter Company; RAMINTONG: Remington Typewriter Company [1]; LOLITEVVI and ALLIWETTIS: Olivetti; UNDERWORDS: Underwood ...


16

Facit was a brand of typewriters made by the company of the same name in Åtvidaberg, Sweden. The poem says so in the second stanza: Mine is a Swetish Maid Called FACIT Others are OLIMPYA or ARUSTOCART RAMINTONG or LOLITEVVI “Swetish Maid” = “Swedish-made”. The other references are to Olympia-Werke, the “Empire Aristocrat” brand of British Typewriters, ...


3

There are many discussions and analyses of "The Patriot" online. The tenor of these is that a patriot or a political leader who was acclaimed for great deeds talks about his downfall and how the common people misunderstand him; eventually, God will repay him. The patriot is seen as unequivocally positive and the common people as fickle and ...


5

These lines need to be interpreted in the context of the complete stanza: Thus I entered, and thus I go!       In triumphs, people have dropped down dead. "Paid by the world, what dost thou owe       Me?"—God might question; now instead, 'Tis God shall repay: I am safer so. There is an enjambment between the third and fourth lines of the stanza: ...


2

Many erroneously assume that Blake-light tragedy is a reference William Blake, who was indeed an enormous influence on Ginsberg and whom Ginsberg does make allusions to elsewhere in other works. However, it is actually a reference to an obscure incident which occurred in Denver, CO where Blake Street is found. Kerouac, Ginsberg, and Cassady spent time in ...


3

The speaker in this passage is calling attention to similarities in slang usage between “queers” (gay men) and “con men” (confidence tricksters). He gives four examples of phrases which have slang meanings to both groups. “‘raise’, letting someone know you are in the same line” “Line” here is “one’s vocation or calling” (OED) so that in context “to be in ...


5

A straightforward explanation is that Browning is referring to literal clay-eating (geophagy) among the natives of the New World (“men of the west”), for example, as reported by Alexander von Humboldt: The Otomacs [of Uruana in Brazil] swallow a prodigious quantity of earth. We found heaps of balls in their huts, piled up in pyramids three or four feet high....


2

It is indeed a joke. She's saying that at a cotillion (in case, you're not familiar, a dance which is meant to formally introduces men and women in a socially acceptable manner) held at Mrs. Van Osburgh's conservatory, it is hot, and there are a lot of ugly women in it. Thus, in comparison, the train isn't so bad. There is an added implication that his ...


2

Your quote should be reduced to Mencken does not take himself seriously, and he is always dismayed when his readers overdo the business. "One horse laugh," he says, "is worth ten thousand syllogisms," and he proceeds to provide many move horse-laughs than examples of neat, careful, judicious, and thorough thinking. I repeat that this is ...


0

It translates to nothing and then nothing and nothing and then nothing. In his depressed mood, he feels that everything is nothing. This is the diagnosis that leads to his parody prayer.


0

What does this passage mean? It is more or less literally the Lord's prayer, Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from ...


1

Jay L. Halio notes in his New Cambridge Shakespeare edition of King Lear (Cambridge University Press, 1994) that the meaning of "the most precious square of sense" is uncertain and that various interpretations have been proposed. He provides an example from The Riverside Shakespeare: Riverside glosses 'square of sense' as figurative for 'the human ...


3

In addition to the examples from Othello and A Midsummer Night's Dream cited in the question, there is at least one other example of this usage of "seem" in Shakespeare's plays. In The Merchant of Venice, Act 2, scene 4, La(u)ncelot Gobbo also uses it: An it shall please you to break up this, it shall seem to signify. Lancelot Gobbo's role is a ...


5

Benedicke’s speech is written in imitation of his accent, see ‘breat’ for ‘breath’ and in the passage after that quoted in the question ‘I tinke you play the knave wid me’. I think this allows us some latitude with the pronunciation of ‘cacke’. I propose not ‘cack’ but ‘cachou’. Per the OED a cachou is: A sweetmeat, generally in the form of a pill, made of ...


6

The usual interpretation of this line is that “seem” is used in the sense: seem, v. 9b. To think fit. Obsolete. Oxford English Dictionary. See for example the Bantam edition, edited by David Bevington, p. 55, or the Everyman edition, edited by John F, Andrews, p. 118. Among the OED’s citations for this sense is: Subtle. Beneath your threshold, bury me a ...


2

‘Colours and cap’ refers to the racing ‘silks’ worn by the jockeys to aid identification during the race. The colours are registered to the horse-owners, in the UK the register is kept by the British Horseracing Authority. Source The length of straight track, from the final bend to the finish line is called the ‘Home Straight’. So their homeward journey ...


3

The Minniemashie House is based on the Palmer House Hotel in Sauk Center, Minnesota. The young Sinclair Lewis worked two summers as a desk clerk at the Palmer House. He later used it as the model for the "Minniemashie House" in his 1920 novel Main Street, set in a town modeled in turn on Sauk Centre. Searching for images of the interior of that ...


3

Graffiti is often opaque in meaning, it is okay to accept an author’s description of it as purely scene setting. It may not be necessary to know what was in the mind of the person who wrote it. We might each have our own interpretation. My own assumption is that a person called ‘Darren Lourd’ was indulging in some escapism and flirting with the idea that he ...


2

As has been previously noted on this tag, this particular author frequently uses unique phrases which have no set meaning in English. This means that it is pretty much up to the reader to take what they can from it. Often these phrasings seem to be as much about lending something to the mood of the passage rather than delivering essential information. What I ...


1

While agreeing with @Greybeard that this cannot be a reference to the woman’s relative openness of outlook, I’d suggest it means more than merely thin. A person can be thin but not ‘narrow’ if they have a robust skeletal frame. Taking ’narrow’ in conjunction with the ‘greyhound of a woman’ phrase, it conjures an image of a person who is not only thin, but ...


0

As the narrator has only seen the wife, she cannot know whether she is narrow-minded. It must therefore mean small in breadth or width in proportion to length; lacking breadth, i.e. she had thin features.


14

The phrase "do the same" refers to what Mrs. Joe is doing with her cleanliness: making it more uncomfortable, although it should be theoretically better, than dirt. This is the same as how "some people" make their religion more uncomfortable than ungodliness. I saw a quote recently which would be apt here; I don't remember the exact words,...


2

Wiktionary identifies ‘porbida’ as one word in the Cebuano language. Pinning down that language is itself something of a goose-chase. A user on Quora, Ray Hart, who says they are in the Philippines explains: Visayan is the language group. There are dozens of languages in that group some of them are close enough to be mutually understandable, others are not. ...


3

While I can’t find any verification of this beast being colloquially named a ‘tiger’, it certainly fits its livery: This insect is Metamasius hemipterus (West Indian cane weevil), a pest of sugar cane fields. With tiger-like colouring, six legs and a long snout, it must be a strong candidate for this ‘tiger’. The description that July gives of her birth is ...


2

In addition to the OED entry for salt, there is this entry for ‘pepper and salt’ With reference to the pungency or biting quality of pepper: intensity (of feeling), spirit, vigour; ‘spice’. To illustrate the usage the definition includes this quote from the 1887 New Orleans Lantern But let me commence my assault on the offending ones and give them pepper ...


0

During the Nazi period, the Germans ran gas chambers and ‘ovens’, not the Japanese. Frank was not brainwashed into believing the Nazis were not that bad, but reflects here on the fact that he had a too negative impression of those Japanese. Yes, they were allied with the Germans, but in this alternate world have become protectors of certain human rights. He ...


1

The criticism in Ezekiel isn’t of fashionable clothing. Looking at a more modern translation we get: Woe to the women who sew magic bands on the wrist of every hand and who make veils for the heads of people of every size in order to ensnare lives. So ‘reasons precisely opposite to those put forward by the sewers of magic bands’ would be… I’ll confess I ...


1

Following along to muru's and Kevin Ryan's excellent answers, "sniper material" may be an allusion to the Cold Sniper (warning, TV Tropes entry) stereotype as a loner with a lack of emotion or compassion. To quote the U.S. Army Training Manual on Sniper Training: "(1) Emotional balance. The sniper must be able to calmly and deliberately kill ...


11

Yes, essentially this is a minor wordplay and double meaning. A "dumb brute" is a phrase that was commonly used to denote an animal, not necessarily even a savagely violent animal. I say "was" because I associate this phrase with a time in English writing when words like "brute" and "savage" carried less negative ...


5

A simpler interpretation is that that "dumb or talking" is merely contrasting "unable to speak" and "speaking". While you could extend that to discuss "human or beast", I think it's easier to read it as "talking or not".


0

First, the afternoon/evening contrast doesn't have any substantive meaning (the key to understanding the phrase doesn't have anything to do with something occurring in the afternoon vs. something occurring in the evening): the phrase could just as easily have been, "To be clever one day argues that one is dining nowhere the next." As for an ...


4

The "mark" here is an antiquated term for "target". So, here, "keep up to the mark" means to stay on task or "on target", as we would say today, towards meeting one's goal (the target). Here, of course, the goal was revising the book. From etymology online (etymonline.com/search?q=mark): "The Middle English sense ...


3

The idea that these are the “only two classes that really can’t help taking life seriously” is (like everything else Reginald says) utter nonsense, but is there a joke or satirical point behind it? I have a theory, which is Reginald is implying that these two classes of people are similar in another way. When Reginald was published in 1904, the head of the ...


6

That speech is a response to Pip's "good night". ‘Goo-good night, sir,’ I faltered. ‘Much of that!’ said he, glancing about him over the cold wet flat. ‘I wish I was a frog. Or a eel!’ Here I believe "Much of that!" is short for "[Not] much [chance] of that!" (although this is not a common contraction, so I may be mistaken). ...


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