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4

You definitely missed something. The narrator, Bilbo, other hobbits, Gandalf and the dwarfs all have different opinions of Bilbo's propensity to burglary. The Hobbit starts out as a children's tale which evolves into a larger fantasy novel. This shows in the structure of the novel, and reflects the history of the work. In a 1955 letter to W.H. Auden, Tolkien ...


2

As I was reading the book to my kids they said that Bilbo is like a kid but then grows up. From a D&D perspective, you can think of Bilbo as being a level 1 rogue/thief. He starts off with little to no skill, nearly succeeding but eventually failing the saving throw when sneaking up on the trolls, wakes Gandalf up at the Orcs front door but gets caught, ...


12

How dare you suggest Gandalf chose the wrong man or the wrong house. That's right. Let us have no more argument. Gandalf has chosen Mr. Baggins and that ought to be enough for you. If Gandalf says he is a Burglar, a Burglar he is, or will be when the time comes. Actual text: "(...) I assure you there is a mark on this door-the usual one in the trade, ...


14

Good Master Thorin, I fear you have been misinformed by the wizard Gandalf. The wizard has prepared a plan for recapturing the dragon's horde without a hero, or even a great warrior (heroes are not to be found and warriors are all waring in distant lands). Gandalf promised you a burglar but gives you this timid gentlehobbit. But Gandalf says that Bilbo ...


20

I've always interpreted that as 'being stealthy', not as 'being good at stealing'. Hobbits are nimble creatures (they're even described as being able to seemingly disappear without a trace), especially compared to dwarves which are much louder. There is little or no magic about them, except the ordinary everyday sort which helps them to disappear quietly ...


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