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3

In the phrase "reet fain", "fain" can hardly be an adverb. It makes more sense to read "reet" as an adverb and "fain" as an adjective. According to Wiktionary, reet exists as an adverb, at least in Tyneside (in North-East England): (Tyneside) right (Since W. H. D. Rouse was born in India, went to school in London and ...


2

This is what it's explained in a note to the BUR version of the Decameron (Italian original), edited by Amedeo Quondam, Maurizio Fiorilla and Giancarlo Alfano: Malpertugio: antico quartiere (contrada: qui per la prima volta con questo significato urbano) di Napoli, attiguo al porto, così chiamato per un varco aperto nelle mura della città verso la Rua ...


6

Malpertugio is not only a realistic name but a real name. A footnote in Wayne A. Rebhorn's translation (W. W. Norton, 2016; page 58) explains that, Malpertugio (…) refers to a gap in the city's walls. It was a commercial area of Naples near the port and the arsenal in which many merchants, including those from Sicily, located their business. (…) Needless to ...


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