27

As someone who rather likes the totally non-canonical idea of gay Edmund, there is really no textual evidence to support this idea and you are right to point out that it is extremely unlikely that Lewis intended the character to be gay. There's not even much of what most people would consider obvious gay subtext. We don't see Edmund longingly describe the ...


20

Note: This does not in ANY WAY represent my own religious views. It's possible that C.S. Lewis meant for the Dwarfs to represent the Jews. At the end of The Last Battle, the Dwarfs refused to be 'taken in' by Aslan. It's possible that C.S. Lewis meant for this to represent the Jews refusing to believe in Jesus. The Jews didn't believe in Jesus. They don't ...


17

The Magician's Nephew is set a generation before The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, specifically 1900 (see Wikipedia). The latter book is set during World War II. Thus, in the time frame of The Magician's Nephew, nuclear weapons had not yet been discovered. Thus, at the time the book is set, the nuclear weapon is still a hypothetical future invention, ...


14

Susan probably made it back to Narnia, because her experience with faith reflects that of Lewis himself. In 1960, C. S. Lewis wrote back to a reader and said that Susan is not in Aslan's country. Not because I have no hope of Susan ever getting to Aslans's country, but because I have a feeling that the story of her journey would be longer and more like a ...


14

Oddly enough, Rowling has cited The Chronicles of Narnia as an inspiration for her King's Cross entryway to the world of magic, but not the part you're thinking of! I found myself thinking about the wardrobe route to Narnia when Harry is told he has to hurl himself at a barrier in Kings Cross Station - it dissolves and he's on platform Nine and Three-...


11

First we need to understand what the "Deep Magic" is/represents, before moving to the "Deeper Magic." We know from chapter 13 of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe that the Deep Magic is written in several places (on the Stone Table, on the Scepter of the Emperor-beyond-the-Sea, etc.). We also know from that chapter that it defines what Justice requires....


11

I believe Lewis meant readers to assume the Scrubb family were adherents of scientism. There's only a small amount of evidence for this in Dawn Treader itself, but it makes sense in light of his expressed views on scientism in his other work. This interpretation also lends itself to a straightforward reading of Dawn Treader as the journey of an atheist to ...


9

Not really private islands, and they don't really retire either. When a star is old enough and has lost enough power, it can go to one of the islands on the Eastern Ocean. While there, it recovers its strength and becomes young again by eating "fire-berries". "When I set for the last time, decrepit and old beyond all that you can reckon, I was carried ...


9

While we can't rule out an influence from Lewis, he was not Gaiman's primary motivation. Gaiman has named different influences for Stardust. Stardust has a much closer parallel to the 1926 book Lud-In-The-Mist by Hope Mirrlees. Gaiman has praised the book, including it in a list of his all-time favourite novels. In this newspaper feature, he makes clear ...


9

Wordy, but fun to write. From context, "smoking-room stories" means something like off-color stories, dirty stories, steamy stories. One dictionary entry for the adjectival form of "smoking-room" glosses it as "Marked by indecency; obscene: smoking-room humor." If you google "smoking-room humor" you will get many relevant hits, of varying degrees of ...


8

If you google "algy met a bear" you will get thousands of hits on the traditional "Algy met a bear, the bear met Algy. The bear was bulgy, the bulge was Algy". If you look up pre-1940 bulgy bear in Google books you get hits, such as this one in Everybody's Magazine with some version of a bear meeting Benjy, with predictable results. Not that our Narnian ...


8

It looks like he was influenced by traditional English fairy stories and in particular a writer by the name of Lucy Clifford A star still falls, a boy still promises to bring it to his true love, there are still wicked witches and ghosts and lords (although the lords have now become princes.) They even gave the story an unabashedly happy ending, which is ...


8

To cite an answer on Christinanity SE that sticks to C. S. Lewis' expressed views on the matter, avoiding theological debates: Lewis does not see any need to settle on a particular theory of the atonement, considering it to be something beyond human understanding. In a letter written to a "Mr. Young" (otherwise unidentified) dated 31 ...


8

The main point of the arm-ring is that it's a piece of treasure Eustace is trying to hoard for himself. He puts it on because he's selfish and grasping, like a dragon. That's why he turns into a dragon, not any curse attached to the ring in particular. Sleeping on a dragon’s hoard with greedy, dragonish thoughts in his heart, he had become a dragon ...


7

(Please note: I'm not a expert in Christian/Lewis in particular's theology; this is my impression primarily from the text of the book.) Peter, Edmund, Lucy and the rest don't know they're dead until the very end of The Last Battle. At the time the discussion of Susan occurs, everyone--including the reader--thinks they simply were pulled through another ...


7

The answer goes back to Genesis 3:15 - And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel.” - Genesis 3:15 (NIV) In this case God is speaking to the serpent in the Garden of Eden; the "he" is speaking of Eve's descendants (any and all of them) and hence including, in ...


7

Although Aslan was more of an immediate presence to Narnia than the Emperor, he and his father worked in perfect unity. The Emperor was often referred to as "Aslan's great Father, the Emperor-over-the-sea" and other such titles. He was greatly respected by his son and all who honoured the Lion. [Wikipedia] I do feel not the the charge of deism can ...


5

It was part of their 'resetting' back to life in our world. Here's the dialogue from when the Pevensies discover the lamp-post again after spending years or decades ruling Narnia: “I know not how it is, but this lamp on the post worketh upon me strangely. It runs in my mind that I have seen the like before; as it were in a dream, or in the dream of a ...


5

We can't be sure. The simple reason for this is, as you noted in your question, that the term itself was first used in 1970 and translated into English in 1978, meaning that Lewis certainly didn't use the modern meaning of the concept. However, that's not to say he didn't reference one of its predecessors. One such predecessor is that mentioned in Ernst ...


5

A few thoughts here: First, it's actually a little more subtle than to say that Narnia is a strict allegory. C. S. Lewis's intent (and some people, such as @Hamlet, would argue that that's not really the same thing as meaning - that's a different discussion though) was to write a "re-imagining" of the Christian story of sorts - for example, if a world like ...


5

TL; DR - Two statistical/computer analyses take both sides, so we still don't know. However, given the advances in computing between 2009 and now, and the methods used, I would personally lean towards favoring the second paper that feels The Dark Tower was written by Lewis. There are really only two actual academic instances that I can find discussing the ...


4

I don't have the book in front of me right now, but Aslan makes it clear in The Magician's Nephew that animals could go back to being "dumb" beasts. In fact, there are several examples of this in the series (such as the cat when he sees Tash in The Last Battle). Consider the following quote (from chapter 10): "Creatures, I give you yourselves," said the ...


4

It is worth noting in this conversation that Lewis had very level-headed opinions about homosexuality and did write directly about the subject outside of his children's fiction; in his private life, he was great friends with a gay man, also a devout Christian, who expressed his theory of homosexuality to Lewis and whose view Lewis seemed to accept as ...


4

Did they simply disappear? That seems like the only possible answer, yes. If you go to Narnia and spend an amount X of time there before returning to our world, then some amount Y of time will have passed here, where the relationship between X and Y is never made quite clear except that Y << X. This is because, for whatever reason, time passes more ...


4

I have read this book a few times (one of my faves), and although you make a compelling point, I mildly disagree with your premise that "they never actually contributed anything to the struggle". Admittedly, they were not heroic front-lines combatants against Belbury as were Merlin, the bear, and to some extent Jane. But they were behind-the-curtain ...


4

It comes from a letter to Mary Willis Shelburne, a lady who was (thought to be) dying. From this page about the Misquotable C. S. Lewis (emphasis mine): When you read the above words what do you think about? More than likely you think they are meant to be encouraging words for someone facing a unfamiliar situation, like finishing school, or beginning a ...


4

As well as its more literal meaning of a (direct or indirect) male descendant, the word "son" can also be used to mean "A man considered in relation to his native country or area" or "A man regarded as the product of a particular person, influence, or environment" (definitions 1.4 and 1.5 in the online Oxford Dictionary). Metaphorically, the word can be used ...


4

To quote The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (pg 183-184 in my edition): And Susan grew into a tall and gracious woman with black hair that fell almost to her feet and the kings of the countries beyond the sea began to send ambassadors asking for her hand in marriage [...] But as for Lucy, she was always gay and golden-haired, and all the princes in ...


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