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3

@dvoyd from tumblr here. 'Quote' source (it's more of poetry than a quote) is myself. It's freelance poetry that I have written and posted on tumblr for 5+ years now. If the quote ends with 'm.a.w' (those are my initials, yes) and it shows up in my writing tag on tumblr (here) then it's my work.


2

The source is Joseph Conrad's Notes on Life and Letters. The full text of this work, published in 1921 a few years before Conrad's death, is available on Project Gutenberg and also at Online-Literature.com; the relevant section is entitled "Anatole France—1904", the 5th section of "Letters", the first half of the book. I quote the full ...


3

I've found something almost exactly identical to the quote you're looking for, but it's much newer than the US Founding Fathers; it comes from Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, Chapter II: Not so much like drops of water, though water, it is true, can wear holes in the hardest granite; rather, drops of liquid sealing-wax, drops that adhere, incrust, ...


2

It comes from Lady Dorothy Nevill's book Under Five Reigns. This book was edited by her son Ralph Nevill and first published in 1910. The "Introductory Note" establishes the purpose of the book: "further notes and letters connected with the social life of the Victorian and Edwardian eras". The full text is freely available from the ...


2

War of the words: HG Wells coin also features false quote The new coin is inscribed: ‘Good books are warehouses of ideas’ – but digging reveals the quote to be both wrong and expressing a different sentiment Source : The Guardian It looks like the Royal mint might have messed up somewhat in choosing an applicable quote ! Author Eleanor Fitzsimons solved ...


19

TL;DR: It’s a typographical error: for “ideas” read “ideals”! “Ideals!” said my uncle; “certainly Ideals. Of course one must have ideals, else life would be bare materialism. Bare fact alone, naked necessity, is impossible barren rock for a soul to root upon. Life, indeed, is an unfurnished house, an empty glass in a thirsty land good and necessary for ...


2

The good news is that googling that line gets a thousand hits. The bad news is that they are almost all quotations posted without credit, as if written by the poster, that so many people seem to enjoy throwing around at each other. Excluding tumblr and pinterest sites, there are fewer than a hundred hits. Unfortunately all the ones I checked seem to be just ...


2

The earliest occurrence of this quotation that I can find is from 2004: “The secret to humor is surprise” —Aristotle The Bathroom Readers’ Institute, ed. (2004). Uncle John’s Colossal Collection of Quotable Quotes, p. 22. Oregon: Bathroom Readers’ Press. Suffice it to say that the “Bathroom Readers’ Institute” is not a scholarly or reliable source, and ...


3

The most likely sources of that Aristotle quote (if it is one) would be the Poetics and the Rhetoric. Searching the Poetics for "humo[r]", "secret" and "surprise" (individually) in the translations by Samuel Henry Butcher (1922) and Ingram Bywater (1898) turns up nothing that looks relevant. Then again, since The Name of the ...


5

tl;dr Bhagavad Geeta 2:47 Source of Sandip's allusion The passage Sandip alludes to is indeed from the Bhagavad Geeta. The exact source is Chapter 2, verse 47: कर्मण्येवाधिकारस्ते मा फलेषु कदाचन । मा कर्मफलहेतुर्भूर्मा ते सङ्गोऽस्त्वकर्मणि ॥ iTrans: karmaNyevaadhikaaraste ma phaleShu kadaachana maa karmaphalaheturbhuurmaa te sa~Ngo.ostavakarmaNi ...


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