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The term "white wizard" is used in the context of the white magic / black magic distinction. Black magic is malevolent, used for harmful or evil purposes; white magic is benevolent, used for good and selfless ones. The site Wicca Living explains: If people believed they were the victim of a curse, they would seek out a “white witch,” also known in ...


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There are a couple of other occurrences in Hardy of “Turk” as an imprecation or mild oath. ‘Come to that, is it? Turk! won't thy mother be in a taking! Well, she's ready, I don't doubt?’ Thomas Hardy (1872). Under the Greenwood Tree; a Rural Painting of the Dutch School, volume II, p. 19. London: Tinsley Brothers. ‘Well, why shouldn't the man hang up her ...


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What makes Sammy think: "Poor kids, I began to feel sorry for them, they couldn't help it" has nothing to do with his own reaction. It isn't only Sammy and McMahon that were entranced by the situation. Everyone in the store was too, male or female: The sheep [other customers] pushing their carts down the aisle […] were pretty hilarious. You could ...


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I’m not sure that the use of ‘gruel’ sustains deep scrutiny into the history of the dish or the term. Although many sources state that it was a ‘thinner’ porridge, which leads to a general, ‘Oliver Twist’ influenced perception that gruel is always penitential in character, in fact it could be a very rich dish, such as this example with dried fruit, egg ...


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This would seem to fit the bill: A Corner of the Veil by Laurence Cossé Paris. May 24 1999, 8.32pm: Father Bertrand Beaulieu of the venerable Society of Casuists, holds in his trembling hands six handwritten pages that prove the existence of God. Instantly, the secular and spiritual powers move to suppress the news, certain that it signifies their own ...


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I found this question while reading the same story, but I was puzzled at what "go for lost" meant instead. Anyway, I think I might be able to help you. For context, I'm from the Philippines and my native language is Filipino. The phrase "Kung mapatay 'di madedeadball." is in colloquial Filipino. Here's the breakdown: Kung = if; mapatay = ...


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