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The comparison here turns on "half-primitive vigor" vs. "racial senescence." A people early in their history (by which is generally meant their appearance in historical records -- a concept more applicable to civilizations, though not strong even there, but unfortunately commonly applied to races in 1932) are bursting with life and can-...


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Windows and doors are often used as symbols, representing transition, or access to something, especially without fully immersing in it. Consider: when one door closes, another opens I shut the door on that possibility the eyes are the window to the soul for a brief window anything seemed possible The passage seems to me to say that being surrounded by ...


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I'm suprsed that the question was migrated. The use of "half + adjective" is common enough: "He was half-dead with exhaustion". "She was half-aware of a conversation taking place in the adjoining room". "I was half-convinced by the ridiculous argument." etc. The meaning of "half" is not literal but more "...


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It is practice in modern-day beekeeping to have part of your hive separated by a gap that is large enough for the worker bees to get through but too small for the queen (a queen excluder). This ensures that the queen only lays eggs in part of the hive (the brood box), and you can freely harvest the rest for honey. This was invented by the Rev. Lorenzo ...


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The first International Horse Show was held at Olympia in Jone 1907, and until halted by the First World War established itself as one of the social events of the annual calendar. ‘In those great and far-off days almost everyone was horse-minded so it was hardly surprising that great success became the under-taking,’ wrote Geoffrey DS Bennett in Horse & ...


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It transpires that part of the confusion with this sentence arises from a difference in the text between the first UK publication in the Strand magazine of September 1917 and the later collected stories as published in book form. The Strand edition says (my emphasis) 'you are joining up with your old service' The story takes place on the 2nd of July 1914, ...


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(Couldn't fit this into a comment….) I think that, in this story, the cat primarily serves the function of atmosphere (that of having something else in the room rather than just Egbert and Lady Anne); otherwise the (already very short) story would be even shorter, and boring. I don't think any deeper symbolism needs to be looked for: while, as far as "...


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The Sanskrit word for mountain is parvat. Pārvati is a patronymic meaning "the daughter of the mountains". Such patronymics are very common in Indian mythology. For example, Sītā, the daughter of king Janaka, is often called Jānakī. Similarly, one of the Vedic sun deities is Savitṛ, and his daughter is Sāvitrī. In "The Cabuliwallah", ...


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It’s clear from the context that the “tips” were on the underside of the boots: In the shady hollows, the soft loam bore prints of many feet, and among them we could distinguish one with an iron toe-tip, but it was nearly obliterated by another studded with hob-nails. […] And here we both halted abruptly, for in the damp ground were the clear imprints of a ...


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The point that Thorndyke is making is that in order for a fingerprint to show that a particular person committed the crime, two things need to be established: The print was left by that person. Only the criminal could have left the print. But often the only evidence presented is: The print matches that person’s finger. (3) goes some way towards ...


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