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Terry Eagleton's book Literary Theory: An Introduction (second edition, 1996) offers the following explanation (emphasis added): The literary work continually enriches and transforms mere dictionary meaning, generating new significances by the clash and condensation of its various 'levels'. And since any two words whatsoever may be juxtaposed on the basis ...


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For Michel Foucault, discourse does not simply mean "verbal exchange"; in and through his work it has come to mean (quoted from Wiktionary), An institutionalized way of thinking, a social boundary defining what can be said about a specific topic (...) For example, in Madness and Civilization (Folie et déraison, 1961) he described how the Age of ...


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Harold Bloom certainly criticised New Historicism. In his book The Western Canon, he said: Whatever the convictions of our current New Historicists, for whom Shakespeare is only a signifier for the social energies of the English Renaissance, Shakespeare for hundreds of millions who are not white Europeans is a signifier for their own pathos, their own sense ...


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