5

I agree with the conclusion you've already posted: the lawyer upped the 5 years to 15 years because of impulsive pride. However, I think it's interesting to look at this in the wider context of the story, which is really all about pride and impulsiveness set against wisdom and patience. At the start of the story, both the banker and the lawyer are described ...


4

This looks like В море ("On the sea"): There is a newlyweds' cabin on the ship in the sea The sailors have made two holes in the cabin walls to spy on the newlyweds for their own amusement The cabin is occupied by a newlywed Protestant priest and his wife, the sailors (a father and his son) are spying on them. They witness the pastor (who is apparently in ...


4

Approximately 100,000,000 roubles. This is not a straightfoward conversion due to fluctuations in the value of the rouble after the collapse of communism. This historical currency converter runs up to 2015 and makes various calculations based on the comparison of the value of important goods and services. It has this to say about the conversion: 95000 ...


3

The sentences can be explained with the help of the fuller context: I speak to Lisa and Lisa speaks of parallel crying, the crying that comes alongside art but not precisely from it. Plot does not jerk the tears from you; some other force corresponds. This pleases me, as I have always preferred parallel lines to perpendicular ones. Perpendicular lines are ...


3

Chekhov's gun … is a dramatic principle that states that every element in a story must be necessary, and irrelevant elements should be removed. … "One must never place a loaded rifle on the stage if it isn't going to go off. It's wrong to make promises you don't mean to keep." … — Chekhov's gun - Wikipedia. Chekhov’s Gun, Chandler’s Gun, and ...


2

Simon Karlinksy notes in an edition of Checkhov's letters that the short story Gusev, published in December 1890, uses "the device of subtly intermingling the soldier's speech patterns and his stream of consciousness with the authorial voice" (page 183). J. A. Cuddon writes that the term "stream of consciousness" was coined by William ...


2

This short story is a hilarious caricature on the--oh so typical--characters. Both of them are pathetically "ignoble1, repulsive, and senseless", and being such, they of course blame the world on it. Exposing these traits is the centrepoint of much of Chekhov's output. So this "another old general" is the punch line, so to speak. Like ...


2

Drowning is out of question, for a few reasons. First, the word translated as water-barrel in Russian original is кадушка; a vessel holding perhaps four or five gallons at most. It physically impossible to drown in it. Second, the entire story is in past tense, except that Groholsky is staying with Bugrov to this day is in present. This surely means that ...


1

When you mention the "main character", I'm going to assume you are referring to Madame Ranyevskaya. (Checkov's plays tend to be ensemble pieces, and I'm not sure it's useful to designate a main character, but Madame R. may qualify as the central character in that everything revolves around her, and she is the symbol for the vestigial aristocracy that was at ...


1

The most likely reason is this is simply just because of pride. As you mentioned, the lawyer isn't receiving additional compensation, but I personally think that the lawyer got fired up in the heat of the argument. Being as reckless and young as he was, only 25, I'd say that his pride went before his common sense and he desperately wanted to prove that ...


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