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Does the term myopia have a special meaning in the context of literature?

Myopia is in its most direct meaning a healthcare condition: relating to, or exhibiting myopia : NEARSIGHTED

Myopia or myopic should refer to: lacking in foresight or discernment : narrow in perspective and without concern for broader implications.

Quotes from merriam-webster

Like most who mutilate Chopin, he was musically myopic, fawning over each note instead of seeking the longer shape of a phrase, its arc and context, where the real beauty lay. — Andrew Corsello


Higher learning can offer individuals and societies a depth and breadth of vision absent from the inevitably myopic present. — Drew Gilpin Faust


When he ran again in 2013, this time without a primary opponent, his campaign had an almost myopic focus on a subject dear to Republicans: job creation. — Andy Kroll

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    Myopia has a figurative meaning, per the OED, of 'Lack of imagination, foresight, or intellectual insight.' Would that cover the usages you are finding? – Spagirl Apr 29 at 13:21
  • Thinking more like the meaning: Things are a mess, nothing works, Things are blended together. – MOLAP Apr 29 at 20:00
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    can you add example sentences and their context into the question? It’s really difficult to understand what the usage is without that. – Spagirl Apr 29 at 21:34
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    I am sorry, but without your citing examples in your question of the word in use, where it is referencing literature specifically, it is unlikely that anyone is going to be able to help much.. – Spagirl Apr 30 at 9:24
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    I’m sorry, I’ve done my best here and I still don’t really know what your question is. Good luck with it though. – Spagirl Apr 30 at 22:52
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All of the examples you give seem to be using the term "myopic" to mean focusing on something small, or very specific, while ignoring the larger view.

Like most who mutilate Chopin, he was musically myopic, fawning over each note instead of seeking the longer shape of a phrase, its arc and context, where the real beauty lay.

In this context, we're talking about someone, presumably a musician. The paragraph is saying that he, this musician, "mutilates" Chopin (a famous composer). The musician focuses - myopically - on each individual note, where the real beauty is in how they all work together. He's nearsightedly peering at the notes instead of seeing the song.

Higher learning can offer individuals and societies a depth and breadth of vision absent from the inevitably myopic present.

In this example, we're again using myopic in a sense of not seeing the bigger picture. The "inevitably myopic present" is that we focus on the here and now. The present is inherently not the past or future. We inevitably focus on the present, not the past or future.

When he ran again in 2013, this time without a primary opponent, his campaign had an almost myopic focus on a subject dear to Republicans: job creation.

This one's is talking about the focus of the candidate's campaign - job creation. This person running for office is basing his campaign around one thing. He's focused on this one thing, so much so that it is basically the only thing that he's working with.


So, to answer the initial question: No, it doesn't have a "special meaning" in literary context. It's a word; treat it as one. If you come across a word in a work of literature, the interpretation and nuances of that will change drastically based on the context and surrounding text. It has to be analyzed along with all the other words.
Don't be myopically focused on analyzing this one word at the expense of the others.

  • A "special meaning" in literary context could maybe be a special way of structuring a story by an author, giving the characters in a story such characteristics, so that the whole book ends up becoming a myopia. Could that be a use case? – MOLAP May 1 at 9:57

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