Peter Elbert
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Analysis of "While I speak God's law, I will not crack its voice with whimpering."
Accepted answer
4 votes

There is no onomatopoeia (strictly) in this excerpt. Onomatopoeia in the most restrictive sense is a word which resembles or evokes a sound in a directly sonic way. For example, if the sound of a car ...

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Did T.S. Eliot really plagiarize in "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"?
4 votes

Plagiarism means unlawful theft of intellectual property in the context of writing. Modernism is heavily characterised by what is commonly referred to as allusiveness. When an author uses another ...

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Edmund Spenser's sonnet "My Love is like to ice, and I to fire"
3 votes

The first question: It doesn’t. It’s a weak reading of the poem. The author claims the adjectives shift and imply fire as positive and ice as negative. I don’t see there being any additional meaning ...

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What is meant by "descent of their last end"?
Accepted answer
1 votes

“The last end” or the final end, the end of everything, is a poetic way of referring to death, which gives the story closure, as it is what the title and key topic of the story are. One of Joyce’s ...

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Is there a name for the narrative technique of starting at the end and then going back to the beginning? (As in Lord Jim)
1 votes

A story which begins at the end and then skips to the beginning is a nonlinear narrative. Sometimes, the act of jumping back to a previous point in the story is called a flashback. If the story ...

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What does the poet's introduction in Dante's Inferno mean?
1 votes

The ghost of the poet Virgil is introducing himself, specifying that he is from the city of Mantua in the province of Lombardy, and that he was born under the reign of Julius Caesar (1). Anchises was ...

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Why is the separation between literary criticism and literary theory controversial?
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It is more common outside of highly academic, theoretical literary discourse to consider “criticism” as the discipline of reviewing and appraising literary works and theory as any attempt at ...

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Louise Glück's "Vespers"
0 votes

I haven’t read the volume but I believe the poem can be understood in and of itself. Nietzsche’s great quote that to appreciate an artwork is to feel we understand why the artist made those choices (...

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Can all forms of drama be categorised under the four types 'tragedy', 'comedy', 'tragicomedy' and 'melodrama'?
-1 votes

That's a deep question. We have to turn the analytical lens back on itself: what is a genre, anyway? Where does the assertion of one come from? On the most basic level, a genre seems to be a typology: ...

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If a first-person narrator addresses the reader, is it considered speech or thought?
-1 votes

There is no completely correct way to decide if a first-person narrator addressing a reader is speech or thought, at least not without further contextualising that communication. Does the text provide ...

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