6

Most of these aren't saying "whore". The one that does is "Hohore", which according to this page is actually "ho whore"; "ho" here is the exclamation. Also, note the r in "hore". The Oxford English Dictionary's earliest attestation for "hoe" (for any spelling without r) meaning "whore" is from the 1964 book Deep down in Jungle: Main who', best girlfriend....


6

So from the context, here's my understanding: A common trend that's observed from a lot of A Happy Death is the treatment of women as mere objects, rather than as human beings. This is portrayed quite well in the beginning of that paragraph: The natural stupidity which glowed in her eyes emphasized her remote, impassive expression. The remark, "hello, ...


4

ShakespearesWords.com provides two definitions for "sir": man, person, individual gentleman, lord, gallant, master The first definition can be ignored, since it is not a form of address. The article Address forms on ShakespearesWords.com also adds the following explanation: respectful title for a priest, clerk, or other professional; often mock ...


3

For myself, as an English speaker with only a smattering of Russian from a foreign exchange trip, I did a lot of checking the glossary in the back at first (obviously, I got an edition which included said glossary), but eventually started just trying to figure it out from context, which worked well enough. As regards Burgess's motivation, it was a ...


3

The Oxford English Dictionary says: heave of the sea: the force exerted by the swell of the sea in quickening, retarding, or altering a vessel’s course. So the ship was heaved by the sea and this caused the woman to fall, perhaps when she was walking along the gangplank to or from the jetty. What have the moon and the sun to do with it? These celestial ...


3

The word "villain" is derived from the 14th-century word "villein" which means: a free common villager or village peasant of any of the feudal classes lower in rank than the thane. Merriam Webster dictionary So originally, it would certainly have carried the connotation of low birth. I found this question on English Language & Usage about the ...


2

Stanley Wells' edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream (The New Penguin Shakespeare, 1967, 1995) has the following gloss for "Tartar": The Oriental bow was of special power. The image may have come to Shakespeare by way of Golding's translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses, X.686-7, 'she / Did fly as swift as arrow from a Turkey bow'. R. A. Foakes' edition of A ...


1

A partial answer - a few commentators on Shakespeare's works point out that by the Tartar's bow he meant the Cupid's bow as depicted on a number of popular paintings, sculptures. The same commentators claim that a bow of that particular shape was known (at Shakespeare's times) as Tartar's (as opposed to an English bow that was straight, less curved). See ...


1

Wharton is correct if you locate the “first acts” and the “dramatic climax” in the same places as she does. The question interprets “first acts of the tragedy” as “first in the text”, that is, those at the beginning of chapter I, in the ‘present’ of the novel. But Wharton means “first in historical sequence”, that is, the earliest actions in the flashback, ...


1

In his 1943 article, “The Round World and the Winning of the Peace,” English geographer Halford Mackinder described Britain as a 'moated aerodrome' in the 'Midland Ocean' (ie the North Atlantic and surrounding countries, ie the US, Canada, France, and the UK). It's been suggested already that the Ingsoc slogan in 1984 ('Who controls the past controls the ...


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