14

The other answers have explained the meaning of the line—that Macbeth shall be king, as he was promised by the witches—but there is more to say about the choice of wording. The difficulty here arises because Lady Macbeth is expressing herself evasively. Why doesn’t she come straight out and say, “thou shalt be king as thou art promised”? The reason is that ...


7

What Lady Macbeth means with "what thou art promised" is the kingdom that Macbeth was supposedly "promised" in the witches' prophecy. All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Glamis! All hail, Macbeth, hail to thee, thane of Cawdor! All hail, Macbeth, thou shalt be king hereafter! So he is Thane of Glamis, became Thane of Cawdor and the remaining ...


5

Stanley Wells' edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream (The New Penguin Shakespeare, 1967, 1995) has the following gloss for "Tartar": The Oriental bow was of special power. The image may have come to Shakespeare by way of Golding's translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses, X.686-7, 'she / Did fly as swift as arrow from a Turkey bow'. R. A. Foakes' edition of A ...


4

Enrique Suárez Figaredo, in his edition to El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de La Mancha, uses the contents of the entry "átomo" in the Tesoro de la lengua castellana o española by Sebastián de Covarrubias to interpret it as specks of dust: n. 52 átomos del sol: motas de polvo. Lo explica el Tesoro: Comúnmente llámamos átomos aquellas moticas que ...


4

It's possibility 4. These are dialog, and they are undoubtedly meant to convey a pronunciation of have without the /h/. You could also spell this pronunciation: if we'd've raised the blinds we'd've seen daylight. Note that there are other mistakes in this dialog. The second 'd in the second sentence is also incorrect grammar (of a form that is quite common ...


4

ShakespearesWords.com provides two definitions for "sir": man, person, individual gentleman, lord, gallant, master The first definition can be ignored, since it is not a form of address. The article Address forms on ShakespearesWords.com also adds the following explanation: respectful title for a priest, clerk, or other professional; often mock ...


3

It's "deliberate" bad grammar to portray uneducated people who are not part of the elite. So their using "would of" in place of "would have" is part of the "characterization" of such people. At some level, they don't really belong in a novel with people like Nick, Daisy, Jordan, or even Gatsby. Except that they were "hangers on," Myrtle as the mistress of ...


3

The words "Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be / What thou art promised" can be explained as follows: You are Thane of Glamis (Macbeth's title at the beginning of the play), You are Thane of Cawdor (a title conferred on Macbeth after the original Thane of Cawdor defected to the invading Norwegians; see Act I, scene 2), You shall be (or become) what ...


3

There are five occurrences of "vasty" in Shakespeare's plays: 1 Henry IV, III.1.50: "I can call spirits from the vasty deep" Henry V, Prologue: "Can this cockpit hold / The vasty fields of France?" Henry V, II.2.123: "He might return to vasty Tartar back" Henry V, II.4.105: "the poor souls for whom this hungry war / Opens his vasty jaws" The Merry Wives of ...


2

The context for this phrase is: Like a huge Python, winding round and round The rugged trunk, indented deep with scars, Up to its very summit near the stars, A creeper climbs, in whose embraces bound No other tree could live. But gallantly The giant wears the scarf, and flowers are hung In crimson clusters all the boughs among, A ‘creeper’ is A plant that ...


1

This is a much more interesting question than the o/p perhaps understood. There is legitimate scholarly opinion to the effect that Shakespeare did not include any Witches in his play. The modern notion of 'witches' is a misunderstanding; or perhaps may be classed rather as an exaggeration. The text which modern academics ascribe to Shakespeare speaks of '...


1

A partial answer - a few commentators on Shakespeare's works point out that by the Tartar's bow he meant the Cupid's bow as depicted on a number of popular paintings, sculptures. The same commentators claim that a bow of that particular shape, now called a recurve bow, was known (at Shakespeare's times) as Tartar's (as opposed to an English bow that was ...


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