17

I could only find 7 words from Lewis Carroll's works in my copy of the Oxford Dictionary: Burbled — to bubble or gurgle (or a combination!) And burbled as it came! Chortled — a muffled laugh/snort combination He chortled in his joy. Galumphing — galloping in a triumphant manner He went galumphing back. Gimble — to grimace Did gyre and gimble ...


14

Actually, most of the new words appears to have based on existing words to some extent: either taking a noun and turning into a verb or vice versa (one example of this would be "to dawn"), or shortening a word or adding a new beginning ending ("irregulous"), or joining two words together ("eyeball"): all these would be rather easily understood. More ...


11

Strictly speaking, it is not possible to determine whether Shakespeare invented the words that had not been recorded before they appeared in his works. It is possible that at least some of these words circulated in spoken language before Shakespeare picked them up. Of course, I am not claiming that Shakespeare invented none of the words that were first ...


7

There are two questions here: the origin of the idea of the ‘halfling’, and the origin of the word ‘hobbit’. The former seems to be adequately explained by European folklore, which describes dwarfs, elves, fairies, goblins, brownies, kobolds, leprechauns, and other kinds of small magical people. So I will concentrate on the latter. Tolkien described the ...


6

Most of these aren't saying "whore". The one that does is "Hohore", which according to this page is actually "ho whore"; "ho" here is the exclamation. Also, note the r in "hore". The Oxford English Dictionary's earliest attestation for "hoe" (for any spelling without r) meaning "whore" is from the 1964 book Deep down in Jungle: Main who', best girlfriend....


4

Catherine Milner, Arts Correspondent of the Telegraph, wrote in 2002: According to Dr Faber, a retired physicist who is now 74 and lives in Cambridge, Eliot was "a very generous godfather and the subject of great envy by my siblings". "He was quite a chameleon in many ways; he would be grave or funny as he so desired and could write anything - adopt any ...


3

One possible term is mot juste, which means (in English), the exactly right word or phrasing. See Merrian-Webster. I believe it also means the same thing in French. We generally use the French phrase in English because there's no good equivalent English word.


1

Some extra material building on Spagirl’s answer. Eliot’s godson Tom Faber was the son of Geoffrey Faber, the co-founder of the publishers Faber and Faber for whom Eliot worked as an editor. Tom’s widow Elizabeth put up Eliot’s letters to her husband for auction in 2005. This collection of typed letters includes the first known appearance of “Jellicle” and “...


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