7

"The echoes of your rocks" is an indirect object, and "my carols wild" is a direct object. That's the only way I can make sense of this sentence. The words "a happy child" are a descriptive comment on the pronoun "I". So we could rewrite these phrases as follows, for clearer meaning: (original) I taught, a happy child, [t]he echoes of your rocks my ...


7

TL;DR: Line numbers in the margin of manuscript A indicate that the missing page 9r in manuscript B had 24 lines, of which 17 can be restored from manuscript A, meaning that 7 are missing. Manuscript history Stephen Gill writes (p. 743): Home at Grasmere Earliest composition 1800. Not published in W[ordsworth]’s lifetime, other than ll. 959–1048, which ...


5

Betty Foy's son, the "idiot boy", is not a boy in the conventional sense ("a young male"). Betty Foy uses the term probably in the second sense provided by Wiktionary: (diminutive) A male child: a son of any age Note that Wiktionary also provides a third sense: (affectionate, diminutive) A male of any age, particularly one rather younger than the ...


4

After line 25, the poem turns dark and troubled, as                                             the huge cliff Rose up between me and the stars, and still, With measured motion, like a living thing Strode after me. Before that, you notice the careful way the writer creates a sense of unease within a moment that should be pure pleasure. But instead,...


4

this poem depicts the innocent nature of a child who just does not want to understand that her siblings have passed away of natural causes and continuously reiterating her determined claim that they are still seven children. That's a nice description of how the speaker (not Wordsworth) perceives the child. Like the speaker, you describe her response as ...


4

Neither. Coleridge is referring to his own reservations about some of Wordsworth's poems. The context makes this clear: A friend whose talents I hold in the highest respect, but whose judgment and strong sound sense I have had almost continued occasion to revere, making the usual complaints to me concerning both the style and subjects of Mr. Wordsworth's ...


3

The match can’t be a friction match as these were not invented until 1826, long after the publication of ‘The Female Vagrant’ in the first edition of Lyrical Ballads, 1798. Instead, the blue flame indicates that it is a sulphur match. Before sulphur matches, the way to light an oil lamp (if you didn’t have a fire already burning) was to use flint and steel ...


3

That would be my understanding, yes. Either because of wind the match is burning weakly or because a flame is coloured according to what is burning, so there might have been 19th century matches that were dipped in a chemical which produced blueish flame.


2

TL;DR: The speaker does not actually want to be a pagan. In this sonnet, the octave describes the spiritual inadequacy of modern life, and the sestet describes a more attractive but still untenable alternative. The question that is implied by the poem is thus: since we have lost our spiritual relationship with Nature, and since we cannot go back to paganism, ...


1

One possibility is the line "Little we see in Nature that is ours" from Wordsworth's sonnet "The world is too much with us". The poem reads as follows: The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;— Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! This Sea ...


1

Suckled here means 'raised', or 'brought up '. Outworn means old-fashioned or outdated. So it means 'I'd rather be a Pagan brought up in an outdated religion'. So might I means "then (or thus) might I". But 'So' also has a sense of 'if'. "I had been happy if the general camp,/Pioneers and all, had tasted her sweet body./So I had nothing known."[Othello ...


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