11

This is an interesting question. I don't have a definitive answer, but here is some pertinent information. In the foreword to the book, the fictional (and pathologically self-important) Kinbote suggests reading the notes first, then the poem (with the help of the notes), and then the notes again: Other notes, arranged in a running commentary, will ...


8

Nabokov sometimes used translations into English as an opportunity to touch up his work, but sometimes he didn't. Below are a few case studies. Maybe the best example of Nabokov making changes is Laughter in the Dark, the author's rewrite of Winifred Roy's 1935 translation of the Russian Kamera Obskura. Colapinto has a piece in the New Yorker called How ...


7

Apart from the quote by Silenus, I can remember two more germanophobic passages. The first one is about Fyodor's student (and it mentions humor): Он был самодоволен, рассудителен, туп и по-немецки невежественен, т.е. относился ко всему, чего не знал, скептически. Твердо считая, что смешная сторона вещей давным-давно разработана там, где ей и полагается ...


7

Here is a passage from The Gift which depicts two Germans as brutish and indifferent to human suffering. Yasha's death had its most painful effect on his father.... Meanwhile nothing stopped with Yasha's death and many interesting things were happening: in Russia one observed the spread of abortions and the revival of summer houses; in England there were ...


7

Quote source In his translation of the short piece "Father's Butterflies" by his father, Vladimir Nabokov, Dmitri Nabokov has a neat little reference to "the terrible turtles who direct learned journals." As the quote says, the piece "Father's Butteflies" should have the quote. In the link Peter Shor kindly provided, which is ...


6

Apparently Nabokov did know of Mann's works. As documented in his Strong Opinions (which I found here and there via a Google search for "nabokov mann"), he held no high opinion of Mann: Ever since the days when such formidable mediocrities as Galsworthy, Dreiser, Tagore, Maxim Gorky, Romain Rolland and Thomas Mann were being accepted as geniuses, I have ...


3

In poetry, alliteration requires stressed syllables that begin with the same consonant sound. Nabokov's novel Lolita is written in prose, so we don't need to analyse the metre to determine which syllables are stressed; we only need to know each word's main stress. In Nabokov's first two sentences, we can find two groups of alliterations: based on the "...


3

Unfortunately, I think it will be difficult to find it. John Colapinto writes in his article for "The New Yorker": The obvious solution would be to buy or borrow a copy of Roy's translation and compare it to Nabokov's, but that’s almost impossible to do. “Camera Obscura” sold only a handful of copies upon its release, and the London warehouse containing ...


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