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Ulysses is the Latin form of the Greek Odysseus, stemming from the Sicilian or alternate Latin form Ulixes. The first instance of these forms in literature that I can find is in the Odusia by Livius Andronicus. This is an early translation of the Odyssey (third century BC). The only parts of it that survive are 46 lines from 17 books of the Odyssey, but ...


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I am not a linguist, but I think it's worth mentioning that the Odysseus→Ulysses transformation is a special case of something called the "Sabine L": some words that had "d" sounds in Old Latin (or in Greek) became "l" in later (classical) Latin. Examples include: lacrima in Latin from Old Latin dacrima, from Greek dakry from PIE *dakru- from which both ...


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The original source of the quote seems to be Virgil in a Cultural Tradition: Essays to Celebrate the Bimillenium, edited by Richard Andrew Cardwell and Janet Hamilton. Google books shows that this book contains the quote Yeats divagated into Virgil's territory only when, in 1915, he wrote Per Amica Silentia Lunae, going for that title to Aeneid 2, 255, A ...


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As I said in my comment above, Latin and English poetry are very different.  They both have multiple layers of depth and meaning, but in very different ways.  Firstly, meter in Latin is not based on stress but on long and short syllables.  This isn't even a thing in English, so a translation in meter is impossible.  Even translating it into an English meter ...


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