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9

TL;DR: Joyce criticized dramatic flaws in Hamlet, but never condemned the play as a “failure”. Summary Richard Ellman’s biography of Joyce makes it clear that Joyce thought Henrik Ibsen a better dramatist than Shakespeare, and in 1908 he criticized the dramatic aspects of Hamlet in a conversation with his brother Stanislaus. However this has to be balanced ...


8

You are correct to point out that Joyce's use of the stream of consciousness technique developed over his career. While there are only inklings of it in his early work, there is quite a bit of it in Ulysses. Ulysses, however, is not the apogee of the stream of consciousness technique in Joyce. That spot is reserved for Finnegans Wake, a work in which Joyce ...


6

Most of these aren't saying "whore". The one that does is "Hohore", which according to this page is actually "ho whore"; "ho" here is the exclamation. Also, note the r in "hore". The Oxford English Dictionary's earliest attestation for "hoe" (for any spelling without r) meaning "whore" is from the 1964 book Deep down in Jungle: Main who', best girlfriend....


6

According to the Gilbert schema for understanding Ulysses, created by Joyce for his friend Stuart Gilbert, the technique that is used in the "Cyclops chapter" (a designation that also comes from the schema) is "gigantism". This normally means the overgrowth of the entire body or certain parts of it, which seems an apt likeness for the kind of long lists the ...


5

Because the statement "A key theme of the novel is Bloom's relative social isolation" is false. Answering this in the negative, when no evidence to the positive has been presented whatsoever, is bound to be difficult. Rationally, I should not proceed until such evidence has been provided. But here goes. Short Argument - "Reductio ad Absurdum via Occam's ...


4

To add to andejons' answer regarding the Gilbert schema's technique of "gigantism", I'd suggest Joyce may also have been referencing, parodying or even honouring the 16th century Gargantua and Pantagruel by François Rabelais. It's the story, told over five books, of two giants, and is replete with numerous lists and catalogues, some of which go on for ...


4

To understand this, once needs to know a little Irish history. Essentially Ireland has been an island riven by violence almost continually for over a thousand years. First it was the Vikings, raiding, pillaging and settling. Then it was the Normans followed by the Tudors who, through the reformation, then lead a bloody, divisive series of religious wars ...


3

This question has been well discussed. See for example Kenner Chapter 13. Here is my take. All the quotes are from the penultimate chapter. That is the ending Bloom desires. Bloom gets the son he lost. Bloom desires Stephen to move in and rent Rudy's room. In Bloom's mind, Stephen can get singing lessons from Molly, tutor Molly in Italian, etc. Bloom ...


2

When I put ulysses bloom circumcised into Google, the top result was this Jstor page for the academic article Erwin R. Steinberg, "James Joyce and the Critics Notwithstanding, Leopold Bloom Is Not Jewish", Journal of Modern Literature 9(1) (1981), pp. 27-49. This article says: At birth, Bloom was not circumcised, for, in the Nausicaa episode, after he ...


2

To respond to what I think is the core of your question, yes, it is possible to translate the style of old forms of literature while still being quite readable for a present day audience. However, there are a number of reasons why this is problematic and why Joyce would never have done so. Firstly, the passages here mimic a translated style, in doing so ...


2

Parody of long lists in the original Odyssey or in epic poetry in general? The Odyssey grinds to a halt when the travelers arrive in Hades and see all the most beautiful women in history, both real and fictional. The Iliad has several catalogues. The most famous is the Catalogue of Ships in Book 2, some 250 lines just listing all the Greek commanders ...


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