8

Stevenson's admission of the earlier stories and authors he'd plagiarised borrowed ideas from comes in My First Book - his little-known preface to Treasure Island, first published in McClure's Magazine in September 1894. First Stevenson acknowledges very readily some minor ideas and motifs taken from other writers: It is not to be wondered at, for stolen ...


8

TL;DR: The opening chapters of Treasure Island make it clear that the "Admiral Benbow" must be within a few miles of Lynmouth in Devon. Stevenson wrote a detailed account of the writing of Treasure Island. Although this does not mention the "Admiral Benbow" or its location, it does include the passage: … how troublesome the moon is! I have come to grief ...


7

William Ernest Henley. Per Andrzej Diniejko, in William Ernest Henley: A Biographical Sketch: Robert Louis Stevenson modelled the most famous pirate in literature — Treasure Island's Long John Silver with his wooden leg — on his crippled friend Henley. Doris Alexander, in Creating Literature Out of Life, devotes a chapter to Stevenson's creative process ...


5

Billy Bones (first mate) Confirmed from his own mouth: "I was first mate, I was, old Flint's first mate, and I'm the on'y one as knows the place. He gave it me at Savannah, when he lay a-dying, like as if I was to now, you see." -- Chapter 3, "The Black Spot" Long John Silver (quartermaster) Confirmed from his own mouth: "No, not I,” said ...


5

As far as I can tell, it does seem that you've uncovered an inconsistency or mis-writing on Stevenson's part. Let's analyse the whole journey carefully, using a map of Treasure Island for reference: At the start of Chapter 24, Jim wakes up in the coracle at the southern end of the west coast of the island: I awoke and found myself tossing at the south-west ...


2

Allardyce, he was the skeletor compass. And Darby McGraw.


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