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11

As Aurorar0001 says, Watership Down is a real place name in Hampshire, England. The following comments are meant to shed some light on the origin of this place name. The second part, Down, is a noun and here has a meaning similar to 'hill'. To quote the Merriam-Webster dictionary, a down is "an undulating usually treeless upland with sparse soil — ...


6

I'm wondering if the claim you heard was a conflation of a few things. I could find two sources online stating that the title of Why Didn't They Ask Evans was something Christie overheard. The first is this IMDB review from 2013, which claims: The title of the book actually came from a conversation Ms. Christie overheard coming out of a movie theater, and ...


4

Well, the answer is a lot less scandalous than I thought. Apparently, the reason why the title is different in the U.S. is that another book called The Seven Husband of Evelyn Hugo was being released right around the same time, and publishers wanted the book to not be confused with the very similar title of The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle. As Stuart ...


3

In an edition published in 1909, Israel Gollancz simply notes in a gloss to Mamillius's words in Act II, scene 1, "A sad tale's best for winter", hence the title of the play. - I[srael] G[ollancz] Many other editors say essentially the same thing. In addition, Israel Gollancz writes in the preface to the same edition, incongruities and ...


3

The subject of Vega’s poem is the disastrous expedition of Francis Drake against the Spanish colony of Panamá in Central America, where he met his death of dysentery in 1596. ‘Drake’ of course means ‘dragon’, and Vega combined this with ‘tea’, meaning ‘fire-torch’ in Spanish, to produce an image of the English sailor as a fire-breathing dragon: Como el ...


2

Boccaccio used the title Divine Comedy for the first time in a work that has variously been called Vita di Dante ("Life of Dante") or Trattatello in laude di Dante ("Short Treatise in Praise of Dante"). I quote below the relevant section from G. R. Carpenter's translation Boccaccio's Life of Dante (New York, The Grolier Club, 1900): ...


2

This entire answer is a spoiler; it's impossible to answer the question without it. (Even the question doesn't make sense without the spoiler.)


1

This is quintessential Tolstoy the man, Tolstoy the philosopher. The point is not to judge or second-guess God's actions. He has His own ways, and we can only be sure that He knows everything. The argument is the same as one of those put forth today against death penalty: wrongful convictions do happen, even in the face of 'hard evidence', and when (if!) ...


1

Winter afforded plenty of time to sit around and tell each other stories, since there was a lot less work and the weather was inclement. The popular tales were often unrealistic fairy tales or similar stories. It's alerting the audience to expect such a story.


1

The title is obviously also a homage to, or play on, Rabbit Redux by Updike. The word redux has been more commonly used since its publication. Wiktionary says this: The word may have re-entered popular usage in the United States with the 1971 publication of the novel Rabbit Redux by John Updike,[1][2] although it had previously been used in medicine,...


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