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35

It is a punning reference to the phrase ‘trip the light fantastic’, which means (per The Phrase Finder) To dance, especially in an imaginative or 'fantastic' manner. The phrase seems to arise from the works of Milton, in Comus he wrote, as you have already seen, Come, knit hands, and beat the ground, In a light fantastic round. And in L’Allegro Come, ...


33

In-universe the "light fantastic" is an actual, factual thing. There was no real need for the torches. The Octavo filled the room with a dull, sullen light, which wasn’t strictly light at all but the opposite of light; darkness isn’t the opposite of light, it is simply its absence, and what was radiating from the book was the light that lies on ...


10

As Aurorar0001 says, Watership Down is a real place name in Hampshire, England. The following comments are meant to shed some light on the origin of this place name. The second part, Down, is a noun and here has a meaning similar to 'hill'. To quote the Merriam-Webster dictionary, a down is "an undulating usually treeless upland with sparse soil — ...


8

The light that Pratchett refers to is Octarine. This is defined in the Discworld books as the eighth colour of the spectrum and the colour of magic. "The Colour Of Magic" itself being a title of another book in the series. This is fantastic because its existence is part of the Discworld fantasy universe. Pratchett is very fond of such puns and ...


5

One of the central themes of the story is how the protagonist's daughter closely resembles his wife at a similar age. He begins the story by describing his relationship with his wife, all the way from the beginning to now, particularly dwelling on the sexual parts. This segues naturally into discussing his daughter, whose teenage self he introduces into the ...


4

Well, the answer is a lot less scandalous than I thought. Apparently, the reason why the title is different in the U.S. is that another book called The Seven Husband of Evelyn Hugo was being released right around the same time, and publishers wanted the book to not be confused with the very similar title of The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle. As Stuart ...


4

I'm wondering if the claim you heard was a conflation of a few things. I could find two sources online stating that the title of Why Didn't They Ask Evans was something Christie overheard. The first is this IMDB review from 2013, which claims: The title of the book actually came from a conversation Ms. Christie overheard coming out of a movie theater, and ...


3

It's 'The Light(noun) Fantastic(adjective)' That's how it is used both in Milton: On the light (noun) fantastic (adjective) toe (verb) and how this construction is generally rendered in English. Examples: The Brothers (noun) Grimm (adjective) The Brothers (noun) Karamazov (adjective) In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean (noun) blue (adjective) A Tale (noun)...


3

In an edition published in 1909, Israel Gollancz simply notes in a gloss to Mamillius's words in Act II, scene 1, "A sad tale's best for winter", hence the title of the play. - I[srael] G[ollancz] Many other editors say essentially the same thing. In addition, Israel Gollancz writes in the preface to the same edition, incongruities and ...


3

The subject of Vega’s poem is the disastrous expedition of Francis Drake against the Spanish colony of Panamá in Central America, where he met his death of dysentery in 1596. ‘Drake’ of course means ‘dragon’, and Vega combined this with ‘tea’, meaning ‘fire-torch’ in Spanish, to produce an image of the English sailor as a fire-breathing dragon: Como el ...


2

One example is Icelandic sagas. Two of the most famous such are Egil's Saga and Njal's Saga, bearing personal names. Others, such as Laxdæla saga have place names in their titles. The examples of the Iliad and Odyssey from another cultural tradition show the same mix: place name and personal name, respectively, in this case. In classical Greek literature ...


1

This is quintessential Tolstoy the man, Tolstoy the philosopher. The point is not to judge or second-guess God's actions. He has His own ways, and we can only be sure that He knows everything. The argument is the same as one of those put forth today against death penalty: wrongful convictions do happen, even in the face of 'hard evidence', and when (if!) ...


1

Winter afforded plenty of time to sit around and tell each other stories, since there was a lot less work and the weather was inclement. The popular tales were often unrealistic fairy tales or similar stories. It's alerting the audience to expect such a story.


1

The title is obviously also a homage to, or play on, Rabbit Redux by Updike. The word redux has been more commonly used since its publication. Wiktionary says this: The word may have re-entered popular usage in the United States with the 1971 publication of the novel Rabbit Redux by John Updike,[1][2] although it had previously been used in medicine,...


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