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30 votes
Accepted

Contrasting depictions of Asians in Tintin

Hergé apparently met an art student called Chang Chong-Chen, the same name he gives to the man who saved Tintin in Blue Lotus. Mark Tweedale at Multiversitycomics.com writes: Why the change? Well, ...
Spagirl's user avatar
  • 19.1k
26 votes
Accepted

Censorship of African-American characters in "Tintin in America"

The first efforts to market Tintin to an American readership happened in the early 1960s, in the ill-fated "Golden Press debacle", when, among other things, the American publisher Golden ...
Clara Diaz Sanchez's user avatar
14 votes
Accepted

Why the smiling devils in Hergé's 'The Broken Ear'?

I am not aware that Hergé commented on this scene specifically, but its incongruity has been widely noted. In Tintin: The Complete Companion, Michael Farr notes that: as The Broken Ear nears its ...
Clara Diaz Sanchez's user avatar
14 votes

Why the smiling devils in Hergé's 'The Broken Ear'?

The last we saw of Ramón and Alonso is that they drowned each other under the mistaken belief that they were still fighting Tintin. So the panel with the devils should be understood as symbolic or ...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
  • 57.8k
4 votes

Which Tintin books were redrawn by Hergé?

Below is a list of the 24 official Tintin albums with notes on revisions they underwent, where applicable: Tintin au pays des Soviets / Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (1930): this album was never ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 44.8k

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