8

We don't know very much about the life of Thomas Malory, but it is clear that Le Morte Darthur draws on French sources. For example, in "Capitulum tercium" (in the version printed by Caxton, which is available at the University of Michigan), Malory writes (emphasis mine), Soo in the grettest chirch of london whether it were Powlis or not the Frensshe ...


3

The edition I own of Le Morte d'Arthur is the Penguin Classics version in two volumes: Image source: AbeBooks I'd highly recommend it for someone who's accustomed to reading English literature with old-fashioned turns of phrase (from Shakespeare to the various 19th-century authors or even Tolkien) but not necessarily with archaic, obsolete, or inconsistent ...


2

There are two versions of Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur: the text as printed by Caxton in 1485, from which I believe the Penguin edition is derived, and the "Winchester Manuscript" text, not printed until 1947. Apparently this was the text as it left Malory's hand; Caxton used it in preparing his version. My copy of the latter, in the Oxford Standard ...


2

I would go for either of the following editions: Le Morte d'Arthur. Ed. John Rhys (1906). (Everyman's Library 45 & 46.) London: Dent; London: J. M. Dent; New York: E. P. Dutton. You can find libraries that have it through WorldCat. Le Morte Darthur: Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table,. Ed. A. W. Pollard (...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible