Hot answers tagged

3

All of the examples you give seem to be using the term "myopic" to mean focusing on something small, or very specific, while ignoring the larger view. Like most who mutilate Chopin, he was musically myopic, fawning over each note instead of seeking the longer shape of a phrase, its arc and context, where the real beauty lay. In this context, we're ...


2

The comment differentiates language and literature and suggests they have opposite futures. the future of the English language is grand Language is a broad category that includes verbal and written communication of many forms. If the language is connected to the dominant world power, as English is, then the comment suggests that the society promises to ...


2

He may be making the case that hermeneutics is qualitatively different from medieval scholasticism. Scholasticism is mostly deductive, chasing out implications or inconsistencies in received texts, but with a known result in mind, to validate existing dogma, whether that of canon law or of Greek philosophy. Even Abelard at his most radical, in Sic et Non, ...


1

In terms of "what is the literary canon," to paraphrase noted science-fiction author Samuel Delany (from his About Writing) the most practical marker of inclusion in the "canon" is when a work remains part of the living discourse, because of ongoing creation of an active body of derivative (adapted, parodied, modernized, retold) and secondary (critical, ...


1

I say they are both. The books do tell a story but with multiple endings based on the readers choices and the result of dice rolls. The choices you make tell the story and the battles that you have also are part of the narrative.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible