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22

It started in the 1600s, and was a gradual process not a sudden one. By the Edwardian era, it was no surprise to the audience to see an actress on stage. Up until the 1600s, women had very few rights, and there was no chance of a woman appearing on stage. Theater was popular during the early 1600s and in other places in Europe woman first appeared on stage ...


12

This is an excellent site discussing five-act structure in Shakespeare, containing a diagram and numerous examples. Essentially, the five-act structure can be broken down as: Prologue Conflict Rising Action and Climax Falling Action Denouement Exposition of the five-act structure is associated with Freytag, who was concerned with Classical Drama and ...


5

After some more research, I found the answer to my question. According to The Growth Of English Drama by Arnold Wynne (p. 176), [George Peele's play] Sir Clyomon and Sir Clamydes merits a passing notice if only because it contains the earliest known example of a girl disguised as a page, the Princess Neronis waiting upon her lover in that office. Since ...


3

To my knowledge, the only Elizabethan or Jacobean play that is a sequel to a Shakespeare play is The Woman's Prize, or the Tamer Tamed by John Fletcher, a play that was first performed in 1609 – 1610. The play is a mock sequel to Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew. In The Taming of the Shrew, Petrucio "tames" Katharina. In Fletcher's "sequel", Petruchio ...


1

If you look at Morrison's "Bread and Butter to Boiling Oil: From Wilde's Afternoon Tea to the Beauty Queen of Leenane," New Hibernia Review, Volume 14, Number 3, Autumn 2010, you will see that McDonagh could have taken the idea of insane battles over the most trivial of foodstuffs from the famous scene in The Importance of Being Earnest (Wilde 1895). In this,...


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