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23

It started in the 1600s, and was a gradual process not a sudden one. By the Edwardian era, it was no surprise to the audience to see an actress on stage. Up until the 1600s, women had very few rights, and there was no chance of a woman appearing on stage. Theater was popular during the early 1600s and in other places in Europe woman first appeared on stage ...


13

This is an excellent site discussing five-act structure in Shakespeare, containing a diagram and numerous examples. Essentially, the five-act structure can be broken down as: Prologue Conflict Rising Action and Climax Falling Action Denouement Exposition of the five-act structure is associated with Freytag, who was concerned with Classical Drama and ...


12

The book the element of the musical that consists of plot, characters, and spoken dialogue. The book writer is the person who develops the plot, characters, and dialogue for the stage. These can be original, or an adaptation of an older work (movie, novel, non-musical play, etc.), or based on a historical situation. It is the book writer's responsibility to ...


6

It refers to the script, as in Wiktionary definition 6 or Merriam-Webster definition 6: The script of a musical or opera. Looking at the Wikipedia page for the Bonnie and Clyde musical: Bonnie & Clyde is a musical with music by Frank Wildhorn, lyrics by Don Black and a book by Ivan Menchell. So Ivan Menchell wrote the script to the Bonnie and Clyde ...


6

After some more research, I found the answer to my question. According to The Growth Of English Drama by Arnold Wynne (p. 176), [George Peele's play] Sir Clyomon and Sir Clamydes merits a passing notice if only because it contains the earliest known example of a girl disguised as a page, the Princess Neronis waiting upon her lover in that office. Since ...


5

The bareness of the stage in The Globe and other theatre venues used by the Lord Chamberlain's Men and the King's Men should not be taken to imply that there weren't any other elements of stagecraft. G. Blakemore Evans points out that the actors depended on relatively lavish costuming, most of it bought second- or third-hand (...), and a probably fairly ...


4

To my knowledge, the only Elizabethan or Jacobean play that is a sequel to a Shakespeare play is The Woman's Prize, or the Tamer Tamed by John Fletcher, a play that was first performed in 1609 – 1610. The play is a mock sequel to Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew. In The Taming of the Shrew, Petrucio "tames" Katharina. In Fletcher's "sequel", Petruchio ...


3

Below are a few references in English: S. Zhao (2012): "Kafka, Hamlet and the Modern Psyche's Ecology", Foreign Literature Studies, 34(1):152-159. From the abstract: "Shakespeare's Hamlet has special appeal to Franz Kafka, and the two have a deep spiritual relationship. The paper tries to use the relevant records in Kafka's diaries, letters and literary ...


2

You might be thinking of this: Trailer For Every Oscar-Winning Movie Ever - With BriTANick (2010) It's not a play or a piece for theatre, but a spoof film trailer. But the theme of the dialogue is so exactly what you describe that I'm posting it as an answer anyway. For example: B: Friendly concern that something may be missing from your life. A: ...


2

This paper by Andrew J. Power gives a fairly comprehensive use of trapdoors in the Shakespearean era. It's worth noting that the trap would be used any time there is a need for a depression in the stage, so it was almost certainly used for, e.g., the graveyard scene in Hamlet V.i which was big enough to hold the two actors playing the gravediggers.


1

The reason why the concept is usually attributed to Denis Diderot is the following passage in his Discours sur la poésie dramatique, which contains the following sentences: Soit donc que vous compoſiez, ſoit que vous jouïez, ne penſez non plus au ſpectateur que s'il n'exiſtoit pas. Imaginez ſur le bord du théâtre un grand mur qui vous ſépare du Parterre. ...


1

If you look at Morrison's "Bread and Butter to Boiling Oil: From Wilde's Afternoon Tea to the Beauty Queen of Leenane," New Hibernia Review, Volume 14, Number 3, Autumn 2010, you will see that McDonagh could have taken the idea of insane battles over the most trivial of foodstuffs from the famous scene in The Importance of Being Earnest (Wilde 1895). In this,...


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