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The public saw the plays were fiction, perhaps even a warning against witchcraft, and the magic in them is divorced of religious overtones. It is noteworthy that the two Shakespeare plays which deal most overtly with magic, Macbeth and The Tempest were both written during the reign of King James I. James was an enthusiastic believer in the dangers of ...


9

Shakespeare wrote his works in a variety of English known as Early Modern English. At that time, English spelling had not yet been standardised and plays were not highly regarded as a form of literature. As a consequence, the early printed versions of Shakespeare's plays contain a lot of deviations from present-day English, for a number of reasons: ...


7

Whodunit? tl;dr Edward Dowden (1875). Equating Prospero with Shakespeare, and vice-versa The specific equation of Prospero's breaking his staff with Shakespeare's renouncing his art is part of a much larger pattern of identification of Prospero with Shakespeare. In an Oxford University podcast, Emma Smith shows that this pattern goes as far back as the ...


7

The oldest postcolonial reading of The Tempest that I am aware of was published by Octave Mannoni (1899-1989; the French Wikipedia article about Mannoni is a bit longer). Mannoni was a Frenchman who is a bit hard to classify, since he studied philosophy, worked as a teacher in Martinique (which is still part of France's overseas territories), La Réunion and ...


6

"An Attempt to Ascertain the Order in which the Plays Attributed to Shakespeare Were Written" can be found on pages 269 - 346 of the first volume of The Plays of William Shakespeare in Ten Volumes. The chronology itself can be found on pages 274-275. It start with Titus Andronicus (1589) and ends with the following plays and years: A Yorkshire Tragedy (1608;...


6

There is no consensus on who is right. The punctuation placement, the spelling - editors disagree on all of these points. First, I should give a note on why the punctuation would change. At the time Shakespeare's plays were published in the First Folio, punctuation had not been standardized as a system for marking syntax. An introductory guide to ...


5

The bareness of the stage in The Globe and other theatre venues used by the Lord Chamberlain's Men and the King's Men should not be taken to imply that there weren't any other elements of stagecraft. G. Blakemore Evans points out that the actors depended on relatively lavish costuming, most of it bought second- or third-hand (...), and a probably fairly ...


3

I think, just as you said, the book's very title is a reference to Caliban, suggesting that he should be central to the story. I agree. Caliban in the context of colonialism represents the undesired member of that society - much the same as prisoners in today's society. In the Tempest, Caliban is taught English and his feedback to it, in the quote: When ...


2

TL;DR: The Tempest does not respect Aristotle’s unity of action, but to discover this you need to read Aristotle, and even literary critics sometimes neglect primary sources. Aristotle The unity of action comes from the Poetics of Aristotle: After these definitions we must next discuss the proper arrangement of the incidents since this is the first and most ...


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