10

Wordy, but fun to write. From context, "smoking-room stories" means something like off-color stories, dirty stories, steamy stories. One dictionary entry for the adjectival form of "smoking-room" glosses it as "Marked by indecency; obscene: smoking-room humor." If you google "smoking-room humor" you will get many relevant hits, of varying degrees of ...


6

The answer goes back to Genesis 3:15 - And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel.” - Genesis 3:15 (NIV) In this case God is speaking to the serpent in the Garden of Eden; the "he" is speaking of Eve's descendants (any and all of them) and hence including, in ...


4

I have read this book a few times (one of my faves), and although you make a compelling point, I mildly disagree with your premise that "they never actually contributed anything to the struggle". Admittedly, they were not heroic front-lines combatants against Belbury as were Merlin, the bear, and to some extent Jane. But they were behind-the-curtain ...


3

In his letters, J.R.R. Tolkien says that Williams was an influence on it. (He lamented it; he thought the influence had ruined it.) Williams' influence actually only appeared with his death: That Hideous Strength, the end of the trilogy, which (good though it is in itself) I think spoiled it. -- Tolkien's Letters, Letter 257


2

"Tudor" suggests, in Lewis's history of England as shown in this novel, a representative of Logres as opposed to Britain. The fantastical theory of English history which is described in That Hideous Strength, and which perhaps in some part reflects Lewis's own views on the history and culture of this country, is described most clearly in Chapter 17,...


2

In answering this question, I cannot do better than to quote the analysis of David Lake: I will now prove that ‘Jules’ must be taken as Wells, and no-one else. There are at least nine points of contact, including a genuine semi-quotation from a book by Wells placed in Jules’s mouth. I will first demonstrate the similarities, and only later point out how ...


2

It may have been that the macrobes needed the N.I.C.E. people to believe it was all about "science", and not that an evil spirit was haunting the place. The illusion of science (and the required/attending scientist) was a useful one, and the macrobes were happy to play along with that charade so as to get better cooperation and not scare off their pawns.


2

The macrobes used a human head as an instrument of physical communication with their human pawns. We know that they can communicate with humans without the head, but that tends to scare the daylights out of their pawns, so the head is a useful charade. With the original head destroyed or out of commission, the macros needed another--mostly for their own ...


1

I believe that the reason MacPhee is in the story is because the author wanted a counterweight to all the magic and fantasy stuff. MacPhee is a cynic and a skeptic and a realist. He is there as a proxy for all the cynical and skeptical readers. Lewis wanted the cynical point of view to be nearly omnipresent in the story, and yet always have Ransom's sagely ...


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