15

Yeah, you've basically got it. They're syllabic stress indicators. Comics are pretty text-light for how information-dense they need to be. So, tricks like this are used to highlight tonal shifts where they might not otherwise be immediately obvious. There's even a TVTropes page about this. Especially when trying to convey emphasis, even in such a high ...


11

Because he doesn't. Or maybe he does, just a little bit, because Gaiman sort of looks like a whole bunch of other dudes (and dudettes) who influenced Morpheus' looks. Well, at least his face hasn't been explicitly stated to be based on Gaiman's. Reading through canon (that is, word of gods - people who actually worked on The Sandman) sources, I couldn't ...


9

It was a decision by the letterer, Todd Klein. As he explains in The Sandman Companion, it was supposed to reflect her fluent, shifting nature: Delirium was a different challenge. "Her lettering constantly changes in size, shape, and slant, wobbling in out, to indicate that she's always on the verge of madness," Klein says. "Her balloons also contain a ...


9

Quite conveniently, Neil Gaiman answered this in his interview with Hy Bender for The Sandman Companion. In chapter 4, which is devoted to Doll's House, Hy asks Neil whether he was inspired by anything in particular for this story: HB: The first story proper, "Tales in the Sand", reads like a true African fairy tale. Given its authentic feel, I was ...


9

There is no indication in various sources found online that Gaiman was influenced by Heinrich Heine. In short, these are the authors Gaiman said he was influenced by: Michail Bulgakov, Master and Margarita I loved it when I read it, yes;1 Mary Shelley He wrote an essay titled Mary Shelley: My Hero J. R. R. Tolkien (duh) I came to the conclusion ...


7

You have seen that the viewers' perception of Endless is based on individual expectations. For instance, Dream appears as a black short-haired man to Nada, while he usually looks like a pale white messy haired man (not like Neil Gaiman at all) But that's not all. The Endless are different from all the other entities in the sense they are truly endless. ...


6

The three women is a recurring motif in stories and mythology. The fates, the graces, the furies in Greek mythology, the norns in Norse mythology, Shakespeare's weird sisters, etc. In The Sandman, Gaiman recurrently hints that the three-in-one are both the fates and the furies. Perhaps the three - the mother, the maiden, the crone, also stands for some ...


6

It seems it is because many people believe that Dream is Neil's alter ego, probably because at least in some panels Morpheus DOES look like Gaiman: Empire's "50 greatest comic characters" states that Over the run, Dream's appearance has been based on David Bowie, Bauhaus' Peter Murphy, The Cure's Robert Smith and author Neil Gaiman. Gaiman himself ...


6

Her Wikia page says this about the colors of the speech bubbles: Todd Klein, the series' letterer, draws her speech as a scrawl, against a multi-colored background, sometimes the background color will match the mood she is in (red for anger, blue and green for calm, etc.). They don't, as far as I can tell, have a citation for this claim. It appears to be ...


6

Take my word for it or not, but I'm the writer of the article "Mytho-Auto-Bio: Neil Gaiman's Sandman, the Romantics, and Shakespeare's The Tempest." The study focuses the reasons why Gaiman intended to finish Sandman with "The Tempest" by representing Shakespeare completing his bargain with Morpheus in writing The Tempest, which is supposedly Shakespeare's ...


6

Cain is most probably right in blaming Abel for "sanitising". When was "that time"? When The Dreaming was first established, Dream was its only inhabitant for millions of years - at least according to Neil Gaiman: I always assumed the Sandman spent millions of years in a version of The Dreaming completely on his own; and I think he quite enjoys the ...


5

I think @Shokhet is probably correct in that it's likely a form of teasing/light antagonism, but, on further reflection, it probably goes deeper than that. It is an older, less known name for Ishtar. Names have power, and Morpheus is showing some by reminding her he knows her entire history. (The Endless are older than the gods, and likely more powerful.)...


5

The Dreaming is supposed to be a reflection of the real world... or maybe vice versa? In any case, The Dreaming (and Dream), in a sense, define the real world - by defining the things that are not real. Click for full resolution According to Destiny, Morpheus' realm is a "metaphor" or an "allusion" of the real world; it's then easy to interpret dreams ...


5

The Three Witches appear multiple times in the Sandman series, often showing a penchant for trickery and subtle jokes. Here, they are giving Dream a hard time about their names, comparing several Triple Goddesses and throwing in some pop culture references for fun. This implies that they consider themselves to embody aspects of the Triple Goddess, across ...


5

I think it's important to remember in this case that The Sandman was originally published in monthly issues; they were connected by overarching stories, but weren't collected in volumes. Thus I replace the question "Does part four of Doll's House add to the narrative of the volume?" with the question "Why was the story 'Men of Good Fortune' collected in The ...


4

What @Emrakul said, but also because Todd Klein did the lettering. Letterers don't get much notice or respect, but Klein is something of a rockstar in his field. I believe Will Eisner was the first important letterer (although he was also, obviously, an author and artist, and hugely significant if the award named for him is any indication.) With Sandman, ...


4

As already linked, Neil Gaiman—the guy who created the series and created its backstory—is of the opinion that these guys are complete rubbish. Your rebuttal, as far as I can make out, is essentially "nuh-uh". I mean, there's a lot of intellectual firepower and counterexamples to support your denial. In which case, This question already has ...


3

There's not much evidence I could find, but it would be one hell of a coincidence The number 75 is pretty specific. For two comics to stop on that number would be some coincidence, especially because it is quite a small amount of issues. The only thing I could find which may indicate something was from the following interview: Interviewer: How far do ...


3

In the Sandman universe: Hell involved real souls. The Dreaming is purely phantasmic. Lucifer has two rivals for rule of Hell (Azazel & Beelzebub). Forgive me if details are sparse, as It's been years since I last read the series, and I may be conflating the content with the Constantine stories that involve Lucifer, particularly Garth Ennis' run in the ...


3

Dream explains the story of the helmet and the Gates of Horn and Ivory on The Sandman: Overture #3. What is now the Helm of Dream was once the skull of a god. Said god, along with another one, once came to the Dreaming and proclaimed themselves its masters. They took Dream by surprise and imprisoned him. Long story short, with the help of Desire and ...


2

Dream and Desire are the most humanized of the Endless, especially in that they commit so heavily to a specific identity that pervades any and all given manifestation of themselves. All of the Endless do this to an extent, more or less consciously, but Dream and Desire take it a lot further than the others. I don't dispute Ralph Crown's interpretation of ...


2

While discussing this question in chat, Gallifreyan mentioned that he had wondered about the significance of Hob Gadling, arguably the protagonist of "Men of Good Fortune." We both mentioned our pet theories (Gallifreyan's: as a foil to Morpheus; mine: to show how Dream's relationship with humanity changes over time), and that got me thinking about how I ...


2

Hearts are certainly important, and were planted throughout the series intentionally: If you leaf through the series, you'll find either an image of a heart or the word heart in virtually evert issue. Hearts are a major part of what Sandman is about. Neil Gaiman in The Sandman Companion, part two, chapter 4: "The Doll's House"; emphasis respected. ...


2

Well, you already sourced everything so this seems kind of needless, but I'm still under 125 rep... so sure: Per this blog post, Mr Gaiman had ideas about how the characters' voices sounded and Mr Klein was responsible for translating that into lettering. For Delirium: The most unusual was the style used for Delirium. Our idea [sic] was to make it seem ...


2

You're overthinking it. As the 'great mother goddess', Ishtar is literally the 'many-named', the 'thousand-named', the 'myriad-named' and—while you can guess at why the character Morpheus goaded her into suicide by calling her by her lesser names—the author Gaiman is just taking the occasion to point out her other names and former importance, ...


2

The reason for her insistence on the name Ishtar could be quite simple. Belili is the name applied by the Canaanites (1) who were Hebrew, and had their own God. Astarte is the Hellenised form (2), as in Greek. They too had their own Gods. Ishtar is the original Mesopotamian version (3,4) and was associated with far more than just sex. This could suggest ...


2

TL;DR: Both are mentioned in other works ("Murder Mysteries" and Lucifer, respectively) as angels who were somewhat disillusioned with Heaven and followed Lucifer in his rebellion. Spoilers! Raguel's story is described in "Murder Mysteries"1, a short story by Neil Gaiman, collected in Smoke and Mirrors, which also has been adapted into a comic by the ...


2

...why Night and Time? Of all possible entities (or of all possible names), why those two? ... What can we learn about the Endless from their parentage? What symbolism, if any, does it carry? Mr Gaiman likes Greek myth... Night (Gr. Νύξ; Lat. Nox) is the mother of Sleep/Dream both in Hesiod (Theogony, 213) and—albeit implicitly—in Homer (Iliad, ...


1

Gaiman is speaking in relative terms. Burgess may have some ability, but compared to whom? Crowley, in real life, was a charlatan. In his eyes, someone who could call up a stiff breeze on a summer day would seem like a true mage. For all we know, reports of the "feats" of these wizards are the result of the drugs they often took rather than true magick. The ...


1

A simple answer is that souls want to come in to the Dreaming, while they want to get out of Hell. There's a layer of security involved. Also, when Lucifer says Hell practically runs itself, he's referring to a hierarchy of employees who've had millennia to maximize their productivity and learn their mission statement. They all report to him, and in most ...


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