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No. Introduction To begin with, the question Has Odysseus been unfaithful to his wife? would not make sense to the people of ancient Greece. Such a question presupposes that the Greeks had a concept of marital love and fidelity similar to ours, which they didn't. As Stephanie Coontz has pointed out, the idea of marriage as a partnership based on romantic ...


20

TL;DR: Homer’s Ithaca is somewhere in the Ionian islands but his descriptions are hard to reconcile, so pending a really convincing archaeological find it is impossible to be sure how the descriptions relate to reality. Why do we think there might be a real ‘Ithaca’? An important first question, one that is often neglected, do we have any reason to expect ...


17

On the answer Much of the structure of this answer is based on the very clear history of #The Odyssey# and #The Illiad# written by Nicolas Bertrand in a 2009 Article (PDF). The primary sources discussed are the following, and I will try to reference them more closely in successive edits, but this is a process that takes time, as I relied on translations to ...


5

I'm going to attempt an answer with the caveats that the materialists often find my etymological ideas on names to be poetic as opposed to scientific, and that I'd want to know what Graves thought but don't have access to his Greek Myths at the moment. Gallifreyan posted an excellent link to a scholar who pondered this question. My take on the essay is ...


4

Single or Multiple Manuscrips? The editor, Demetrius Chalkokondyles (Demetrius Damilas was the printer), consulted multiple manuscripts. This is how I've found it: Chalkokondyles's editio princeps of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey has two prefaces: One, in Latin, which was written by Bernardus Nerlius, and second, in Greek, which was written by the editor ...


4

Fate is controlled by the Fates, whom no god can contradict. According to Walter Otto's The Homeric Gods (Walter F. Otto, The Homeric Gods: The Spiritual Significance of Greek Religion. 1929. Translated by Moses Hadas, Thames and Hudson, 1979), the Fates are a holdover from a primordial religious belief preceding the Olympians, including Chronos, Gaia, the ...


3

This is a complex subject, and worthy of a thesis, but I'll attempt to briefly address it. The Sarpedon incident is interesting in that Zeus only contemplates altering fate. One could say that his ultimate decision to let Sarpedon die is a confirmation of the inviolability of fate. In the same way, the gods, most notably Poseidon, may argue about ...


3

The whole crew dies, except Odysseus. He started off to the Trojan war with a whole fleet of ships. Odysseus won the victory. Then he landed on the Achaeans land, allies of Troy. He lost 72 men there. Then he came to the island of the Lotus eaters. Where three of his men were 'drunk' from eating the flower and wanted to stay, but Odysseus tied them to his ...


2

Euripides dramatised Athena’s change of heart near the start of The Trojan Women: Poseidon: Do you bring fresh tidings from some god, from Zeus, or from some lesser power? Athena: From none of these; but on behalf of Troy, whose soil we tread, I have come to seek your mighty aid, to make it one with mine. Poseidon: What! have you laid your former hate ...


1

According to Wikipedia, in a pastiche of plot summaries scraped from here and there, The city was razed and the temples were destroyed. and News of Troy's fall quickly reached the Achaean kingdoms through a system of fire relays. ... But though the message was brought fast and with ease, the heroes were not to return this way. The Gods were very angry ...


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