19

She was inspired by a combination of the classic myth of Theseus (in which Athens similarly sends a selection of young men and women to Crete as a 'tribute', the difference being that none of them survive), reality TV shows (many of which involve people being humiliated, albeit not murdered, for the entertainment of the masses), and her second-hand ...


16

You've misunderstood a few minor aspects and one whopping big major aspect of the ending and moral of the Hunger Games series. I'll get the most important point out of the way first. The 76th Hunger Games with Capitol children almost certainly never happened. To understand this, we have to consider what Katniss's motivation was for supporting Coin's plan. ...


14

Regarding authorial intent after the fact, a number of complaints from readers boil down to "If the author wanted to include that bit, it should have been included in the books to begin with." These are stricter textualists, who proclaim that canon is only what's on the pages of the novels, period. So they object to the idea that JK Rowling can say that 20 ...


11

Warning: major spoilers follow. Coin ~ money There are a few ways in which the District 13 leader could be symbolised by the idea of money. Power. Money can be used to buy power, or as a representation of power, and one of the most important things about this character is that she seeks power. Lack of personality. Money has no use value; it's faceless (...


8

We don't know for sure because the books are filtered through Katniss's first person POV and she doesn't know about the conspiracy until later. We do know that Beetee is a tech genius who is shown to be capable of hacking into Capitol television programs to broadcast rebel propaganda. It isn't unreasonable to assume that such a person would also be capable ...


8

He didn't know about it way back during the Victory Tour, only later on. The quote you're thinking of is from the final chapter of Catching Fire: “Neither you nor Peeta were told. We couldn't risk it,” says Plutarch. “I was even worried you might mention my indiscretion with the watch during the Games.” He pulls out his pocket watch and runs his thumb ...


7

When trying to determine authorial intent, it is reasonable to use any source from that author, as long as it is not contradicted by a more direct source. The only problem with using movies in which the author had input is that you don't know how much is from the author and not others, and how much of it was changed for the sake of the adaptation, e.g., to ...


6

This death is probably the single most significant event in the entire series, with the possible exception of "I volunteer as tribute!" in book one. It completely changes every single aspect of the ending of the story, as well as significantly changing the history of Panem. First, let's look at just those changes: The death of Coin. This is the most obvious ...


5

I tend to think of the word trinket as suggesting not only small size and low value, but a small-minded owner, one who obsesses over possessions and ascribes them more value than they really have: the sort of person to whom the phrase "little things please little minds" is ideally suited. The term trinket itself is slightly derogatory - it refers to a thing ...


3

Ruthlessness for sure. Ruthlessness can appear sadistic, but with sadism, the intent is to cause suffering for the purpose of pleasure/satisfaction. With ruthlessness, the goal is to achieve an outcome. A sadist can be ruthless in how they approach their sadism, but not all ruthlessness is sadistic in intent. I found nothing in the books to indicate that ...


3

It is generally a bad idea to assume that the movie is the same as the book. Even when the author is a stickler for control, and manages to get his or her own way, things must be adapted for the screen. Frequently characters are omitted or sidestepped. My favorite example is Ayn Rand's 'The Fountainhead,' where she was both author and screenwriter. She ...


2

Warning: contains unmarked spoilers for the entirety of Mockingjay. Let's consider Gale's role in the plot of Mockingjay, analysing his character in depth. Gale equated with District 13 Gale is a wholehearted supporter of District 13 and the rebellion: he's a soldier serving Coin, and more than willing to kill for his cause. In this he contrasts with the ...


2

I quite like Rand al'Thor's comprehensive answer and will only add that the simple answer may be: The senselessness of war Not in terms of what might incite the sub-optimal condition of war, which, in some cases, can be justified, but that many events and many deaths can be regarded as senseless (i.e. having no good reason.) The reason I focus on ...


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