8

No. Such constructions were the norm in Old English and there's no reason to assume French influence was necessary for them to be available to Chaucer's Middle English versification. Middle English, the flavor of English used by Chaucer, has deep continuities with Old English, the version of the language that Beowulf is written in. Old English is a highly ...


4

The description of the Pardoner's hair forms part of his overall depiction as effeminate. There are strong hints that he is homosexual or possibly even a eunuch. The poet suggests that he and the Summoner are lovers. Chaucer has already said of the Summoner: And hot he was and lecherous as a sparrow.       (l. 626) The Pardoner is then introduced as the ...


3

According to the following, it was not deliberate. Procol Harum's lyricist Keith Reid wrote the words to this song... The lyric, "As the miller told his tale" sounds like a reference to "The Miller's Tale," from Chaucer's English novel The Canterbury Tales... Reid, however, disproves this theory. He told us: "I'd never read The ...


3

The lyrics are on record as not being philosophically meaningful. However, I would presume that all would think like me, that indeed, "as the miller told his tale" was a direct reference to the Miller's Tale in The Canterbury Tales. But apparently I'd be wrong. The lyricist probably did it deliberately to make the song sound literary and highbrow. ...


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