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There is a common, though possibly dated idiom 'like a streak of lightning' which shares precisely the meaning of 'like a streak', and exists in subtle variations 'like a blue streak of lightning', like a greased streak of lightning' or 'like a streak of greased lightning'. Indeed the Oxford Dictionary of Idioms gives the idiom as: like a streak (of ...


4

"Like a streak" is an idiom, as @verbose says in the comments. Quoting the Collins Dictionary: US     Informal     at high speed; swiftly As the dictionary indicates, this is an American turn of phrase. It simply means "at a high speed". So "I was out of the room like a streak" means "I left the room quickly", which ...


4

Both "shade" and "spot" mean "a little bit" here Note: you appear to have quoted the passage slightly incorrectly here. This Goodreads preview has the opening lines as: I was a shade perturbed. Nothing to signify, really, but still just a spot concerned This sentence is using colliquial meanings of "shade" and "...


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