10

It was mainly due to the Victorian interpretations of several events and actions in the novel and subsequent comments from contemporary critics. Firstly, Tess committed murder when she killed Alec. Although the reader of course sympathises with Tess after all Alec did to her, it was still murder, and therefore immoral, in the eyes of Victorian law and hence ...


6

The twist of Liza-Lu and Angel together at the end of Tess of the d'Urbervilles is odd, like you say, and does seem somewhat unnecessary. However, there are some points which can explain why Hardy added it. Firstly, it contributed some sort of resolvement to the ending. Tess is given the death penalty for her murder of Alec. We see this almost through Liza-...


6

In addition to the excellent reasoning of the existing answer, I would like to add one detail. Although not much more can be gleaned from the edition that is in circulation today, the 1891 first edition of Tess of the d'Urbervilles contained some details that were later removed. During the episode at the Chase, Alec actually forcibly drugs her in a very ...


5

At least by implication, yes. Twice, in conversation with Tess, Alec refers to himself as a "sham" d'Urberville: “If you are a genuine d’Urberville I ought not to tell you either, I suppose. As for me, I’m a sham one, so it doesn’t matter. It is rather dismal. It is that this sound of a non-existent coach can only be heard by one of d’Urberville ...


4

This epigraph is best dealt with by being broken down into two parts, but there are vague links between Hardy and Shakespeare's works tied together in this particular quote. (Also, it relates to the overarching themes and events in Tess of the d’Urbervilles, so this answer will link it to such rather than specific quotations from the texts to avoid this ...


1

What would the novel's ending have been like if there was no Liza-Lu? I think she is unnecessarily thrust upon the readers' sympathy. Without Liza-Lu marrying Angel the story would be more elevating and intense. What I can read under the surface is that Tess never got rid of the idea that she is impure, and, therefore, unfit for Angel. Hence, before she ...


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