10

It's an allusion to Shakespeare's The Tempest, Act I, scene ii. Ariel sings to Ferdinand, in order to deceive him into thinking his father has been drowned in a shipwreck. ARIEL sings Full fathom five thy father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade But doth suffer a sea-change ...


9

Looking at Swami Krishnananda's book on The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad (emphasis mine): This instruction, which was communicated to the Devas, Manushyās and Asuras – gods, men and demons – by the single letter Da repeated three times, meaning Dāmyata, Datta, Dayadhvam – be self-controlled, be charitable and be compassionate, is applicable to all ...


8

TL;DR: No. Summary Eliot said that the source of the title, theme and imagery of ‘The Waste Land’ was the medieval legend of the Fisher King: Not only the title, but the plan and a good deal of the incidental symbolism of the poem were suggested by Miss Jessie L. Weston’s book on the Grail legend: From Ritual to Romance. T. S. Eliot (1922), Notes ...


7

T.S. Elliot is trying to communicate a very subtle point, in something of a reverse order, and there are a couple possible interpretations of this. Much of The Waste Land is a tirade on selfishness, portraying the harm it does to oneself. The key line here is actually the last one: Thinking of the key, each confirms a prison. The prison could be one of the ...


7

To say anything definitive about The Waste Land is challenging; indeed, this work seems to evade interpretation with each new line and stanza. With many interpretations carry with them some merit, I contend that the line "heap of broken images" is meant to evoke something broader about modernist art: this line is a metatextual reference to the poem itself ...


6

There is an immediate and direct connection between the two. Toward the conclusion of Heart of Darkness the narrator, Marlow, describes Kurtz as "hollow to the core" (p72). By this, he means that Kutz is lacking in moral fibre and has been seduced into a facsimile of worship by the dark heart of Africa. This is much the same state as the "quiet and ...


4

This is my first attempt at writing an answer, so I hope I have done it right in terms of links of attribution and format. If I have not, I hope someone will tell me, so I can benefit from clarification. Beyond that, I’ll simply give it a whirl! Perhaps this is too simplistic and pedestrian of an interpretation, but maybe we can make a case for simplicity. ...


4

From this source: (emphasis mine) Adopting a prophetic tone of archaic allusion for much of the poem, Eliot asks, “What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow/Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man,/You cannot say, or guess, for you know only/A heap of broken images…” (ll. 19-22). Being a devout albeit unconventional Catholic, Eliot uses ...


4

To add to muru's excellent answer, taking on the "why" part of the question, this final part of Eliot's poem presents us with a world in ruins, not as much in substance as in spirit. The prevailing intention I think, is to depict spiritual emptiness: with the invocation of the biblical crucifixion with no resurrection, the depiction of the Grail with towers ...


4

Catherine Milner, Arts Correspondent of the Telegraph, wrote in 2002: According to Dr Faber, a retired physicist who is now 74 and lives in Cambridge, Eliot was "a very generous godfather and the subject of great envy by my siblings". "He was quite a chameleon in many ways; he would be grave or funny as he so desired and could write anything - adopt any ...


3

1. What plagiarism? The sources of the accusation of plagiarism are the two following articles: Evans, Robert: “5 Great Men Who Built Their Careers on Plagiarism”, Cracked.com, 29.03.2009. Bailey, Jonathan: “Famous Plagiarists: Could it Happen Today?”, PlagiarismToday, 31.05.2009. I did not find any accusation of plagiarism in the 17 reviews, contemporary ...


3

In the essay ‘Hamlet and His Problems’, collected in The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism (1920), Eliot describes Hamlet as an artistic failure because Hamlet’s emotions and actions cannot be fully explained as responses to the events of the play: Hamlet (the man) is dominated by an emotion which is inexpressible, because it is in excess of the ...


3

@DukeZhou correctly referred me to Eliot's Four Quartets. After reading it thoroughly, I think that the passage quoted on the question refers to the following lines of the last part of the third quartet - The Dry Salvages: For most of us, there is only the unattended Moment, the moment in and out of time, The distraction fit, lost in a shaft ...


3

By Eliot's later work, this is almost certainly referring to Four Quartets, Eliot's most post-modern poem. See: T. S. Eliot bibliography > Poetry If you've read a lot of Eliot, there is a great deal of evolution between Prufrock (1917) and the Quartets (1940-43). Rather than attempting a breakdown of the differences between the Wasteland (1921) and the ...


3

While what a poet is trying to tell the reader will usually be a matter of dispute, B. C. Southam shines some light on these lines in A Student's Guide to the Selected Poems of T.S. Eliot, pp. 217-8: ll. 95-8: a parody, combining a line from the children's song 'Here we go round the mulberry bush' - 'This is the way we clap our hands' - with a ...


3

Here is a quote from Xenophon, something said by the pilot's mate on a perfectly ordered Phoenician trading ship: “There is no time left, you know,” he added, “when God makes a tempest in the great deep, to set about searching for what you want, or to be giving out anything which is not snug and shipshape in its place. God threatens and chastises ...


2

I'm no expert on this poem, but having read its first chapter (the first four stanzas, "The Burial of the Dead") several times, poring over individual words and sentences, I came up with a couple of possible interpretations of the "heap of broken images" based on context from elsewhere. Tarot cards The third stanza is all about one "Madame Sosostris, ...


2

The line has a different context in the two sections of the poem. In the first, it is primarily about death, the physical changes of the body and the cold blankness of the eyes. The second section is describing a woman laden with jewellery and the narrator thinks again of the "pearls that were his eyes" as he gazes at the jewels surrounding her. As the ...


2

It is "wind" as in moving air; you can hear Eliot himself reading the Quartets here, with the line in question at minute 45:38.


2

As Gareth Rees pointed out, the Copyright Act of 1911 was the copyright law that was in force when T. S. Eliot published "The Waste Land". Below is how this act defines "copyright" (emphasis mine): For the purposes of this Act, "copyright" means the sole right to produce or reproduce the work or any substantial part thereof in any material form whatsoever,...


2

The second part (“A Game of Chess”) of The Waste Land is a sequence of episodes in different styles, all concerned with seduction. (The title alludes to Thomas Middleton’s play A Game at Chess in which the game of chess is used as an extended metaphor for seduction.) The extract in the question belongs to the second of these episodes, which begins:     “...


1

Some extra material building on Spagirl’s answer. Eliot’s godson Tom Faber was the son of Geoffrey Faber, the co-founder of the publishers Faber and Faber for whom Eliot worked as an editor. Tom’s widow Elizabeth put up Eliot’s letters to her husband for auction in 2005. This collection of typed letters includes the first known appearance of “Jellicle” and “...


1

The relevant essay is "Hamlet and His Problems", written in 1919 and first published in the collection The Sacred Wood: : Essays on Poetry and Criticism in 1920. It has been reprinted in other collections, for example, Selected Prose, edited by John Hayward (Penguin Books, 1953). In this collection the essay was simply entitled "Hamlet" and followed by a "...


1

After some reflection, the simple answer may be that the Dog is the friend that is also foe This assessment is based on the capitalization of Dog, and mythological conception of Sirius, the "dog star" that appears in time of harvest (a boon to mankind) but is also believed to bring madness, disease and death [Iliad 22.1]. This reference from Homer is ...


1

First, I'd like to step back from this stanza a bit and look at an earlier one: What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man, You cannot say, or guess, for you know only A heap of broken images, where the sun beats, And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief, And the dry stone no sound ...


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