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6

There are some examples. Early Pushkin was heavily influenced by Andre Chénier and tried to master his style through translation (here and elsewhere computer translation with my editing): The first translation from Chénier was made by Pushkin in 1823. This is a translation of the first twenty-five verses of Chénier's idyll "L'aveugle", and ...


4

The use of multiple perspectives has been a feature of the English novel from its earliest days. Samuel Richardson's Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740), often considered the first novel in English, itself uses multiple narrators. The first part of the story is told mostly in a series of letters from Pamela to her parents. However, four of those 32 letters are ...


3

As already discussed elsewhere on this site, Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-1542) and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1516-1547) introduced the sonnet into English literature. While doing so, they also introduced a few changes, which are probably due to the lower number of rhyming words in English, a tendency towards pointed arguments, as exemplified earlier in ...


3

From the context of reading the whole quote, the author is trying to describe the diversity of the crowd. As such, to my reading the four clauses separated by commas are each self-contained. I read it like this: There were people from optimistic (cheery) through to pessimistic (sceptical) All ages of men were there He saw all sorts of people from ...


3

The adjective group "cheery and skeptical" refers back to the journalists. I assume the reason for putting it after "journalists" instead of before it has to do with rhythm. Compare the rhythm with Wallace's version with the alternative: Wallace: There was a sprinkling of journalists, | cheery and sceptical, | young men and old men, | ...


3

Wodehouse wrote in a letter to William Townend dated 6 March 1932, (...) It's not all jam writing in the first person. The reader can know nothing except what Bertie tells him, and Bertie can know only a limited amount himself. This letter is quoted in P.G. Wodehouse in His Own Words, edited by Barry Day (Abrams, 2012). One of Wodehouse's early novels was ...


3

I asked @thestorygraph on Twittter: What exactly are the criteria for the tag/mood "reflective" on @thestorygraph? Or should I ask @nodunayo and @RobFrelow ? (Nadia Odunayo and Rob Frelow are co-founders of The Storygraph.) This was the answer: There is no set criteria for it! Typically a book that is thought-provoking, deliberative, references ...


3

As you note in the question, it makes no sense for “L—y” to represent an editorial redaction, because Lucy’s name appears hundreds of times elsewhere in the novel. So the only interpretation that makes sense to me is that Paul wrote the name like this on the fly-leaf of the book. Can we imagine a reason for him to write “L—y” rather than “Lucy”? I think we ...


3

There are two things I think the choice of first-person adds to the poem: novelty, and a sense of movement. The novelty factor comes from the point of view being, well, novel. Bodies of water can't talk, and they aren't usual narrators, so a reader will likely find a poem written from a brook's perspective novel and interesting. For example: I chatter, ...


2

There doesn't seem to be any evidence that Shaw was inspired by Shakespeare specifically in writing this line. Shaw on Shakespeare Shaw's opinion of Shakespeare, in general, is somewhat complicated. He's well known for being openly critical of the immense prestige given to Shakespeare in the field of English literature, and has written as negatively about ...


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