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44

James Joyce preferred dashes to quotation marks for aesthetic reasons. He even went so far as to call quotation marks "perverted commas". He remarks on his dislike of quotation marks at various places in his correspondences: I think the fewer the quotation marks the better.... The ‘ ’ are to be used only in the case of a quotation in full dress, I think, ...


14

It's called "quotation dashes," or "theater style," or "the continental manner." The latter term is because it's used (among several other styles, like < > ) by many languages common in continental Europe, but it's common enough in English that you'll find it in the writings of authors as diverse as William Faulkner, Philip K. Dick, and Cormac McCarthy. ...


10

Omission is an extremely important part of style. Often what is said is actually less important than what is left unsaid, sometimes referred to as the subtext. Hence the critical importance of the oft-repeated advice to "read between the lines." One particularly brilliant use of this stylistic device occurs in F. Scott's Fitzgerald description of Gatsby ...


6

There are some examples. Early Pushkin was heavily influenced by Andre Chénier and tried to master his style through translation (here and elsewhere computer translation with my editing): The first translation from Chénier was made by Pushkin in 1823. This is a translation of the first twenty-five verses of Chénier's idyll "L'aveugle", and ...


5

Originally, what follows was a section of the question. However, at the suggestion of Gallifreyan, I've migrated it to this answer. It's quite long, and it includes works by others as well as a little original analysis of mine that I've done for the case of Easy Rider. Summary of the research conducted so far 'Book titles and their articles' by Leszek ...


5

In Gestes et Opinions du Docteur Faustroll, 'Pataphysicien (transl. Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, Pataphysician), written by Alfred Jarry (of Ubu Roi fame) in 1898 but published in 1911, contains as last chapter (before the Speculations) a chapter called 'De la Surface de Dieu' (transl. On the Surface of God) which contains formulas and a supposed ...


5

When it was published, Cryptonomicon was often compared to Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow, which is also set during WWII and (to a much lesser extent than Cryptonomicon) the present day, has a technology-centered plot (to the extent it has a plot at all), and explores themes of the relationships between individuals, society, and technology. Calculus and ...


5

Examining them independently first of all: The first-person narrative Is defined by the use of personal pronouns, 'I' and 'my' it creates the effect of seeing and experiencing the events of a text through the character's or narrator's eyes, like in your example with I see. Furthermore, it evokes a distinctly personal angle from the text. Is a subjective ...


4

Brooks Landon has already provided the explanation in the final paragraph that you've quoted: just as the thinking of Hemingway’s old waiter is infinitely more tired and less active than the thinking of Faulkner’s boy, the sentence each writer constructs is intended to hit us in very different ways for very different reasons. Start cutting out words ...


4

The passage appears to use the rhetorical device of aporia: the narrator asks a question expressing a certain doubt ("But can one really call it a life?") and then proceeds to give two possible answers. However, neither of these answers really resolves the question; instead, they read like an elaboration of the doubt expressed by the question. If ...


4

The use of multiple perspectives has been a feature of the English novel from its earliest days. Samuel Richardson's Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740), often considered the first novel in English, itself uses multiple narrators. The first part of the story is told mostly in a series of letters from Pamela to her parents. However, four of those 32 letters are ...


4

Wallace's answer is definitive, so this answer is merely in way of commentary on the issue. Hidden information is not only a stylistic choice, but a strategic choice Viewed from the standpoint of information theory, meaning is created by an author's choices. In some cases author's want to "spell things out" in an unambiguous way, but great literature ...


4

In this answer, I'm going to address only the speculation from the last paragraph of the post: Perhaps, the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation, and unheard-of 100 years ago This is far from the case: in fact, by the early 20th century the limited third-person point of view was well along the road to taking over English fiction. So in ...


4

@DukeZhou correctly referred me to Eliot's Four Quartets. After reading it thoroughly, I think that the passage quoted on the question refers to the following lines of the last part of the third quartet - The Dry Salvages: For most of us, there is only the unattended Moment, the moment in and out of time, The distraction fit, lost in a shaft of sunlight, ...


4

The consensus of scholars is that Poe assembled Arthur Gordon Pym in a series of stages under financial and deadline pressure, that his conception of the novel changed at each stage, and that the published text represents an unfinished and unpolished draft that Poe lacked the time or inclination to revise into a coherent whole. Neither the chronicle of the ...


3

The best-known type of poetry that plays with text alignment is concrete poetry. The term was coined in the 1950s (Meid: 468) and should not be confused with visual poetry (Knörrich: 121). The Swiss poet Eugen Gomrigner was probably the first to write some sort of theory of concrete poetry, although he used the term "Konstellation" (in 1953, and in his 1954 ...


3

John Hollander describes poems of this type as pattern poems or shaped verse in his book Types of Shape. Here's a useful quote from the backcover of the book: This book is a collection of pattern poems - poems whose printed format presents a picture of some familiar object that is also the subject of the text. Patterned poems, also called shaped verse,...


3

It is perfectly possible to analyse a scientific text such as a journal article from a literary point of view. This implies looking at aspects such as word choice, the description of the research method, authorial presence and other stylistic aspects. When one compares scientific articles from the seventeenth century from articles from today, it is obvious ...


3

By Eliot's later work, this is almost certainly referring to Four Quartets, Eliot's most post-modern poem. See: T. S. Eliot bibliography > Poetry If you've read a lot of Eliot, there is a great deal of evolution between Prufrock (1917) and the Quartets (1940-43). Rather than attempting a breakdown of the differences between the Wasteland (1921) and the ...


3

The Dynasts is written in the form of a play, but it is immensely long (“three parts, nineteen acts, and one hundred and thirty scenes”) and is written without any consideration for the practicalities involved in staging: Hardy’s own Preface says that it is “intended simply for mental performance, and not for the stage”. For example, part one, act first, ...


3

Wodehouse wrote in a letter to William Townend dated 6 March 1932, (...) It's not all jam writing in the first person. The reader can know nothing except what Bertie tells him, and Bertie can know only a limited amount himself. This letter is quoted in P.G. Wodehouse in His Own Words, edited by Barry Day (Abrams, 2012). One of Wodehouse's early novels was ...


3

In his letters, J.R.R. Tolkien says that Williams was an influence on it. (He lamented it; he thought the influence had ruined it.) Williams' influence actually only appeared with his death: That Hideous Strength, the end of the trilogy, which (good though it is in itself) I think spoiled it. -- Tolkien's Letters, Letter 257


3

I think the first translation you mention is more accurate. Still, omitting comma in first line and adding in last would be more accurate, and here is why: In original it's Ja tarsjusz syn tarsjusza, wnuk tarsjusza i prawnuk, [...] Ja tarsjusz wiem, jak bardzo trzeba być tarsjuszem. In the first row it's not "Ja jestem tarsjusz", or "Ja ...


3

Restating the claim in the question, writers like Joseph Conrad should have structured their books like decks of PowerPoint slides, which would have made them more readable, and clearer. The first point to make, though it may seem a little cheap, is that you haven’t tried it: your questions here have all been written in standardly presented prose ...


3

To answer the question implied by your "I feel": The sentence in question His constant practice of padding out a sentence with useless epithets, till it became as stiff as the bust of an exquisite; his antithetical forms of expression, constantly employed even where there is no opposition in the ideas expressed; his big words wasted on little things; his ...


3

The adjective group "cheery and skeptical" refers back to the journalists. I assume the reason for putting it after "journalists" instead of before it has to do with rhythm. Compare the rhythm with Wallace's version with the alternative: Wallace: There was a sprinkling of journalists, | cheery and sceptical, | young men and old men, | ...


3

From the context of reading the whole quote, the author is trying to describe the diversity of the crowd. As such, to my reading the four clauses separated by commas are each self-contained. I read it like this: There were people from optimistic (cheery) through to pessimistic (sceptical) All ages of men were there He saw all sorts of people from ...


3

As already discussed elsewhere on this site, Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-1542) and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1516-1547) introduced the sonnet into English literature. While doing so, they also introduced a few changes, which are probably due to the lower number of rhyming words in English, a tendency towards pointed arguments, as exemplified earlier in ...


3

There are two things I think the choice of first-person adds to the poem: novelty, and a sense of movement. The novelty factor comes from the point of view being, well, novel. Bodies of water can't talk, and they aren't usual narrators, so a reader will likely find a poem written from a brook's perspective novel and interesting. For example: I chatter, ...


3

As you note in the question, it makes no sense for “L—y” to represent an editorial redaction, because Lucy’s name appears hundreds of times elsewhere in the novel. So the only interpretation that makes sense to me is that Paul wrote the name like this on the fly-leaf of the book. Can we imagine a reason for him to write “L—y” rather than “Lucy”? I think we ...


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