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3

Although it doesn't specifically contain the line you paraphrased, her poem titled "Life While-You-Wait", from 1976, describes the sentiment expressed in it, i.e. that life isn't scripted and can't be planned, and you have to take it as it comes and improvise. Perhaps this is the poem you're referring to? Here are a few excerpts, in a translation ...


7

The Poem is 'Rags' by Edmund Vance Cooke, and the verse you partially recall is And if there's no heaven for love like that, For such four-legged fealty—well! If I have any choice, I tell you flat, I'll take my chance in hell. It's actually a pretty gruesome tale, Rags saves the narrators life twice on the Front and is brought back to the UK with the ...


6

This was already identified by Quassnoi here! The poem is ‘The Water Zoo’ by “Evoe” (a pseudonym for E. V. Knox), published in Punch, 9th April 1924. The fragments your father remembered were well-recalled! Here’s how they correspond to the original lines: “Today I saw 10,000 fish observing me with solemn eyes. In the aquarium.” To-day I have seen all I ...


2

The book to which you are referring is entitled "The Lark and the Laurel", by Barbara Willard. It is the first in a series of five books about England in the time beginning in 1485. The main character's name is Cecily Jolland. Due to the fact that her father has to flee England because of Henry Tudor's accession to the throne she is put in ...


3

It's "The Apostate", by Jack London. The story starts with Johnny being woken by his mother to go to work in a factory as he does every day to earn money for them and his younger siblings. Towards the end of the story: He had long known his mother's ambition for the younger boy, but the thought of it no longer rankled. Nothing mattered any more. ...


3

I found it! It's a book called Confessions of an Economic Hit Man by John Perkins. The book is not as much about the biography or any specific historic event, instead, it describes several cases when America used its powers to gain access to natural resources. Including Panama, Saudi Arabia, and other countries. The author worked for a private company, he ...


4

Probably this is The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years by the Kyrgyz author Chingiz Aitmatov. Quoting from one of the Goodreads reviews: The novel begins with Yedigei learning about the death of his longtime friend, Kazangap. All of Kazangap's crucial relatives have been forewarned of his impending death, and it is decided to set off to bury him the next ...


6

Epicycle by P. J. Plauger. It was published in Analog, November 1973. The first mention in the story is: "No, seriously," I hurried on. "If you were to ask a mathematician to test it he might say: 'Let me see, now. One is prime, three is prime, five is prime, seven is prime. Nine? Nine's not prime. Clearly the theorem is false.' "But a ...


2

There are many versions of this joke. I think I first saw it in Stephen Siklos's university entrance exam preparation text Advanced Problems in Mathematics: Preparing for University: Mathematicians should feel as insulted as engineers by the following joke. A mathematician, a physicist and an engineer enter a mathematics contest, the first task of which is ...


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