5

Epicycle by P. J. Plauger. It was published in Analog, November 1973. The first mention in the story is: "No, seriously," I hurried on. "If you were to ask a mathematician to test it he might say: 'Let me see, now. One is prime, three is prime, five is prime, seven is prime. Nine? Nine's not prime. Clearly the theorem is false.' "But a ...


4

This is "The Night at the Hotel" by Siegfried Lenz ‘Then,’ Schwamm said, ‘he goes on to his school. But when he returns home, he acts bewildered and in a daze, and sometimes even breaks out in tears. He can’t do his homework, he doesn’t want to play or talk to anyone. This has been going on for months, day after day. The boy is simply making ...


4

I am using as a reference for this answer Beauty and the Beast Tales from Around the World by Heidi Anne Heiner, which is 830 pages long -- so, yes, there are a few variants. The thing is that Beauty and the Beast itself is a literary re-telling of a very old tale. It is considered a unique subtype of that tale (with a fair number of variants) because of ...


3

Probably this is The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years by the Kyrgyz author Chingiz Aitmatov. Quoting from one of the Goodreads reviews: The novel begins with Yedigei learning about the death of his longtime friend, Kazangap. All of Kazangap's crucial relatives have been forewarned of his impending death, and it is decided to set off to bury him the next ...


3

This looks like "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by Leo Tolstoy: He (Ivan Ilyich) was so interested in it all that he often did things himself, rearranging the furniture, or rehanging the curtains. Once when mounting a step-ladder to show the upholsterer, who did not understand, how he wanted the hangings draped, he mad a false step and slipped, but ...


3

I found it myself, it was "The Bigger They Come" by A. A. Fair (the pen name of Erle Stanley Gardner). It's the first book in his series about Donald Lam and Bertha Cool. Yes, she’s assigning a detective to work on the case — no — no, not herself... No, she doesn’t go out by herself. She’s — she’s hardly—’ Bertha Cool said, ‘Don’t be bashful. Tell ...


3

It’s called "Enjoying the Chase" by Kirsty Moseley. Hope this helps!


3

I found it! It's a book called Confessions of an Economic Hit Man by John Perkins. The book is not as much about the biography or any specific historic event, instead, it describes several cases when America used its powers to gain access to natural resources. Including Panama, Saudi Arabia, and other countries. The author worked for a private company, he ...


2

This is from "At the Water Zoo" by E. V. Knox: Because of his peculiar gland, He may not hope to salamand His life's ambition forced to throttle, He still remains an axolotl


1

A good samaritan on Reddit shared with me a link to the story by none other than HH Munro (Saki). It is a short story titled "The Background". Signor Pincini was, perhaps, the most brilliant master of tattoo craft that Italy had ever known, but his circumstances were decidedly impoverished, and for the sum of six hundred francs he gladly undertook ...


1

The closest match I can find in Myths and Legends from Korea: An Annotated Compendium of Ancient and Modern Materials by James H. Grayson (Routledge, 2001) is Tale 100: "The Origin of Eclipses" (pages 253-255). This story describes a Dark Land neither sunlight nor moonlight. Dogs were raised in that land that were known as "Fire Dogs" (...


1

This happens twice in the Sherlock Holmes canon, openly inspired by Poe's Dupin. The opening passage of "The Adventure of the Dancing Men", from the collection The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1905), is as follows: Holmes had been seated for some hours in silence with his long, thin back curved over a chemical vessel in which he was brewing a ...


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